Grace Appleby
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So I am starting year 12 in September, and I'm taking Psychology, with History and Religious Studies. Can anyone tell me which topics you study in year 12, in Psychology, as I didn't take it at GCSE. I'm doing the AQA exam board. Thank you.
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nzy
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Do you know which exam board you're studying with?
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username5281360
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Look at the specifications it will tell you every topic you need to know and buy textbooks
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playboiaboodi
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(Original post by Grace Appleby)
So I am starting year 12 in September, and I'm taking Psychology, with History and Religious Studies. Can anyone tell me which topics you study in year 12, in Psychology, as I didn't take it at GCSE. I'm doing the AQA exam board. Thank you.
Im assuming you'll do AQA psych. So the content for year 12 will be social influence, memory, attachment, approaches in psychology (with a bit of biopsych) psychopathology and research methods!
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Lilllyyyy3
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(Original post by playboiaboodi)
Im assuming you'll do AQA psych. So the content for year 12 will be social influence, memory, attachment, approaches in psychology (with a bit of biopsych) psychopathology and research methods!
I’m struggling with research methods and I have an exam next week on it I haven’t even revised yet don’t know where to start!
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playboiaboodi
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(Original post by Lilllyyyy3)
I’m struggling with research methods and I have an exam next week on it I haven’t even revised yet don’t know where to start!
I would say research methods is the toughest one because it isn't content you just have to know, my recommendation is trying to memorize all the things that are applicable and that can be memorised
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kitkadd
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(Original post by Grace Appleby)
So I am starting year 12 in September, and I'm taking Psychology, with History and Religious Studies. Can anyone tell me which topics you study in year 12, in Psychology, as I didn't take it at GCSE. I'm doing the AQA exam board. Thank you.
https://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resourc...82-SP-2015.PDF
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username5161354
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It depends on your school, but usually you will study: memory, social psychology, psychopathology, and attachment. Schools normally also start second year stuff in the first year too, so this includes research methods, approaches, and biopsychology. Your second year subjects are dependent on what your school chooses. Hope this helps! X
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giella
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(Original post by Lilllyyyy3)
I’m struggling with research methods and I have an exam next week on it I haven’t even revised yet don’t know where to start!
Research methods is applied knowledge with some memorisation. You need to know your terms like DV/IV etc. For experimental design and statistical testing, you need to understand the criteria by which you would select one or the other (a decision tree, if you will) and ALL of that information is given to you in the question. There’s no guesswork, it’s just using your understanding to identify and label the information you’ve been given and applying it to the standardised decision making process that you will have learned ie are there two groups or one, is the information categorical or interval etc.
The scarier questions are, for some reason, things like designing a consent form for a participant to sign experiment, or something like ethics but again, these are very prescriptive. As long as you know what goes into these things in order to meet standards – all things you can learn out of a textbook – you can claim all the marks very easily. It’s just about applying your knowledge.
I like teaching research methods because it’s actually a great area to rack up the marks. People tend to overthink it but if you understand this, it actually makes the rest of your content make more sense as well. If you know the reasons why a researcher would use a case study rather than an independent groups design, for instance, you tend to be able to evaluate case studies in a more dynamic way. It should ideally become part of your Psychology vocabulary rather than something distinct from the content.
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Lilllyyyy3
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(Original post by playboiaboodi)
I would say research methods is the toughest one because it isn't content you just have to know, my recommendation is trying to memorize all the things that are applicable and that can be memorised
Tyy Which ones would u say would be essential to memorise?
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Lilllyyyy3
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(Original post by giella)
Research methods is applied knowledge with some memorisation. You need to know your terms like DV/IV etc. For experimental design and statistical testing, you need to understand the criteria by which you would select one or the other (a decision tree, if you will) and ALL of that information is given to you in the question. There’s no guesswork, it’s just using your understanding to identify and label the information you’ve been given and applying it to the standardised decision making process that you will have learned ie are there two groups or one, is the information categorical or interval etc.
The scarier questions are, for some reason, things like designing a consent form for a participant to sign experiment, or something like ethics but again, these are very prescriptive. As long as you know what goes into these things in order to meet standards – all things you can learn out of a textbook – you can claim all the marks very easily. It’s just about applying your knowledge.
I like teaching research methods because it’s actually a great area to rack up the marks. People tend to overthink it but if you understand this, it actually makes the rest of your content make more sense as well. If you know the reasons why a researcher would use a case study rather than an independent groups design, for instance, you tend to be able to evaluate case studies in a more dynamic way. It should ideally become part of your Psychology vocabulary rather than something distinct from the content.
Tysmm haha I have left it way too late but I’m going to try my hardest to memorise key things
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