Esmerussell
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#1
Hi i'm planning on applying for law at uni and am going to take English literature, history and Art and Design: 3D design as well as an EPQ. do you reckon these a levels will be alright considering 3d is considered 'soft'? im not exactly applying for oxbridge and LSE but i love the idea of somewhere like UEA or lancaster.
Thank you for any help
0
reply
emily.g34
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 weeks ago
#2
history and English are definitely good choices, regarding art I'm unsure I would imagine it would be fine for most uni however it would be a good plan to check on a few uni websites they should tell you if they have specific requirements
good luck
1
reply
tinos21
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#3
Report 3 weeks ago
#3
Think about what will make your life easiest when it comes it writing your personal statement next year - will you be able to explain how 3d has given you skills relevant to studying law?

Imo it definitely can be done - maybe consider looking at the legal implications of mass productions using 3d design in your epq or something like that (unless you already have a set idea) as that would unite the subjects nicely.

Be prepared to sell it, basically. If you want to do law then learning how to sell people stuff early on is probably not a bad idea.
0
reply
PetitePanda
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#4
Report 3 weeks ago
#4
Those A levels arent soft but I would worry about that 3D design A level so make sure to check the entry requirements if they accept that as art and design subjects are risky but they are fine to some extent - you just need to do some research.
0
reply
PetitePanda
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#5
Report 3 weeks ago
#5
(Original post by tinos21)
Think about what will make your life easiest when it comes it writing your personal statement next year - will you be able to explain how 3d has given you skills relevant to studying law?

Imo it definitely can be done - maybe consider looking at the legal implications of mass productions using 3d design in your epq or something like that (unless you already have a set idea) as that would unite the subjects nicely.

Be prepared to sell it, basically. If you want to do law then learning how to sell people stuff early on is probably not a bad idea.
OP doesn't need to mention 3D in their personal statement but other things they've done in their extra time. That would defo be interesting topic, especially with privacy law, but they don't need to do their epq or research it based on their A levels. Also, you cant overlap the topics you learn with your EPQ.
1
reply
tinos21
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#6
Report 3 weeks ago
#6
(Original post by PetitePanda)
OP doesn't need to mention 3D in their personal statement but other things they've done in their extra time. That would defo be interesting topic, especially with privacy law, but they don't need to do their epq or research it based on their A levels. Also, you cant overlap the topics you learn with your EPQ.
Of course you don't need to but universities often say they like to know why the applicant thinks those subjects are relevant. Naturally they also don't need to do an EPQ on that but it's a good way of uniting the subjects if they chose to. And I don't take 3D but I'm reasonably sure that they don't teach "3D and the law" as a module, which is what the 'topic' would be, so the OP has no reason to worry about that.
0
reply
harrysbar
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#7
Report 3 weeks ago
#7
Maybe our friendly Lancaster Student Ambassador can comment re the A level in 3D design or the University of East Anglia UG Student Rep
0
reply
PetitePanda
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#8
Report 3 weeks ago
#8
(Original post by tinos21)
Of course you don't need to but universities often say they like to know why the applicant thinks those subjects are relevant. Naturally they also don't need to do an EPQ on that but it's a good way of uniting the subjects if they chose to. And I don't take 3D but I'm reasonably sure that they don't teach "3D and the law" as a module, which is what the 'topic' would be, so the OP has no reason to worry about that.
Could I have a link to those resources from the universities? I do not disagree with you on this or anything but I'm just confused about why they want to know why the subject the applicant pick is relevant, especially for law. Ofc they won't have that as a module but the topic might go inside the area they might choose for Art and Design and it doesn't hurt asking their supervisor if it will overlap. For example, product design might cover packaging, which might relate to some legal issues on material or something, or design in the film could have copyright ideas - I do not have my own experience of it but this what I was trying to imply. I'm not sure what that specific A level entails personally nor the details of the A level but I also doubt OP will need to worry about that - it's something to keep in mind though.
0
reply
Quick-use
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#9
Report 3 weeks ago
#9
(Original post by tinos21)
Of course you don't need to but universities often say they like to know why the applicant thinks those subjects are relevant.
I'm 100% sure this isn't correct... It could be that you've misheard or misread something regarding this?
0
reply
tinos21
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#10
Report 3 weeks ago
#10
(Original post by PetitePanda)
Could I have a link to those resources from the universities? I do not disagree with you on this or anything but I'm just confused about why they want to know why the subject the applicant pick is relevant, especially for law. Ofc they won't have that as a module but the topic might go inside the area they might choose for Art and Design and it doesn't hurt asking their supervisor if it will overlap. For example, product design might cover packaging, which might relate to some legal issues on material or something, or design in the film could have copyright ideas - I do not have my own experience of it but this what I was trying to imply. I'm not sure what that specific A level entails personally nor the details of the A level but I also doubt OP will need to worry about that - it's something to keep in mind though.
(Original post by Quick-use)
I'm 100% sure this isn't correct... It could be that you've misheard or misread something regarding this?
I'm really confused by you two. Personal statements nearly always include something along the lines of "In Subject A I learned Skill B which is useful for university course C because...".
0
reply
PetitePanda
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#11
Report 3 weeks ago
#11
(Original post by tinos21)
I'm really confused by you two. Personal statements nearly always include something along the lines of "In Subject A I learned Skill B which is useful for university course C because...".
I'm just confused by "universities often say they like to know why the applicant thinks those subjects are relevant." I just wanted to know where you got this information from? I just dont know why subjects need to be mentioned as relevant to the course as universities know what the A level entails so if they cared about what subject, they would just state it like LSE's preferred subjects or in their entry requirements - I'm just confused by why would not need to be mentioned why it's relevant.

If it's in a personal statement, tbh I found mentioning A levels more waste of characters because I assume universities know what skills you gain in the A levels. Tbh, it depends on the person because it could be used effectively: for example, it could spark an interest in them learning more about a topic they learn in class; but for me, I plan not to mention my A levels because what I have done in my free time is more relevant to me and my reasons why I want to study the course: for example, for skills, I personally prefer to use my extracurriculars/ super curricular for the skills I gained but again, it's a preference.
0
reply
Quick-use
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#12
Report 3 weeks ago
#12
(Original post by tinos21)
I'm really confused by you two. Personal statements nearly always include something along the lines of "In Subject A I learned Skill B which is useful for university course C because...".
They don't necessarily... This is only the case when students don't have much meaningful content and need to fill space. Otherwise, no reason to justify your subjects on your PS.
0
reply
tinos21
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#13
Report 3 weeks ago
#13
(Original post by PetitePanda)
I'm just confused by "universities often say they like to know why the applicant thinks those subjects are relevant." I just wanted to know where you got this information from? I just dont know why subjects need to be mentioned as relevant to the course as universities know what the A level entails so if they cared about what subject, they would just state it like LSE's preferred subjects or in their entry requirements - I'm just confused by why would not need to be mentioned why it's relevant.

If it's in a personal statement, tbh I found mentioning A levels more waste of characters because I assume universities know what skills you gain in the A levels. Tbh, it depends on the person because it could be used effectively: for example, it could spark an interest in them learning more about a topic they learn in class; but for me, I plan not to mention my A levels because what I have done in my free time is more relevant to me and my reasons why I want to study the course: for example, for skills, I personally prefer to use my extracurriculars/ super curricular for the skills I gained but again, it's a preference.
From some random universities themselves:
From LSE:
Have you gained any skills from your other school subjects that complement your application to study your chosen subject? Have you had the opportunity to undertake work experience relevant to your application? If you did, how did this experience give you a wider understanding of the topics you will study at university?
http://www.lse.ac.uk/study-at-lse/Un...onal-Statement

From Manchester:
Academic achievements/subjects studied at level 3 (AS and A2 levels, BTECs etc.) – Write about your academic achievements. What academic skills and knowledge do you have that will prepare you to succeed in your chosen subject?
http://documents.manchester.ac.uk/di...px?DocID=49108

From Warwick
How are you qualified for the course?
This may be about your prior work experience or evidence of research or reading in the subject area. Your personal and academic skills, achievements and how they relate to the course are also good stories to tell.
https://warwick.ac.uk/study/postgrad...nal-statement/

From Exeter:
What to include:
1. reasons for applying for a particular degree(s) and how this relates to current/previous studies and experiences such as extra curricular activities and interests (this is particularly important when they’re applying for a subject that they have not studied before).
2. reasons for the choice of subjects taken at A level or equivalent
3. what the student can offer - evidence of a willingness/desire to learn at a higher level and evidence that they understand what is required to study the course, eg if applying for psychology courses, show that they know how scientific the subject is
4. details of relevant activities and achievements. Any of the following might be appropriate to include but students should consider carefully and only include those which are relevant. Instead of merely listing these they should demonstrate skills and knowledge gained and note how they will apply this to their future studies.

https://www.exeter.ac.uk/media/unive..._Sept_2011.pdf

Some perhaps less reliable sources:
UCAS Personal Statement builder:
Do your current or previous studies relate to the course(s) that you have chosen? If so, how?
https://www.ucas.com/file/4261/download?token=u7I6M9Q5

From some random Cambridge PS tutor company:
6. How should I talk about my other A-level subjects?

Your subjects will be listed alongside your personal statement in your UCAS application, however talking about other subjects can provide further insight into your chosen course. For instance, if you are studying English Literature and you have taken Classics, you may want to talk about the translation of texts such as the Aeneid, and how is has provided you with the understanding of classical influence in English Literature. Your Personal Statement should be completely grounded in your subject, however if you can find an interesting and relevant way in which to weave another subject in, it can be an interesting way to stand out.

https://oxbridgeapplications.com/blo...nsand-answers/

Hopefully that's comprehensive enough. The skills gained during A levels and reasons behind choosing those subjects are valuable to hear about. It shows that the applicant has chosen their A levels carefully, and is perhaps also careful in their choice of university subject; it shows that they are aware of the skills they ned and have chosen subjects that will further those skills. All of this can be achieved without ever mentioned A levels of course, but it doesn't seem like a bad idea to me to include some details as to why you chose the A levels you have done and how they are proving useful in furthering you along the path to study whatever it is you want to study. It's similar at postgrad level: postgrad personal statements often want information as to how the Bachelor's (or equiv) has been relevant to you doing a postgrad.

At the end of the day, if your A levels are not relevant in some way to your course, then don't mention it. But if they are e.g. the way that both Eng Lit and History are to law, then make use of that. And if you can link a subject that has no obvious link, like 3D, then that just makes you stand out.
1
reply
username1625799
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#14
Report 3 weeks ago
#14
(Original post by Esmerussell)
Hi i'm planning on applying for law at uni and am going to take English literature, history and Art and Design: 3D design as well as an EPQ. do you reckon these a levels will be alright considering 3d is considered 'soft'? im not exactly applying for oxbridge and LSE but i love the idea of somewhere like UEA or lancaster.
Thank you for any help
do maths its a relatively easy a level to get an A if you're willing to be consistent and put the work in
0
reply
PetitePanda
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#15
Report 3 weeks ago
#15
(Original post by tinos21)
From some random universities themselves:
From LSE:
Have you gained any skills from your other school subjects that complement your application to study your chosen subject? Have you had the opportunity to undertake work experience relevant to your application? If you did, how did this experience give you a wider understanding of the topics you will study at university?
http://www.lse.ac.uk/study-at-lse/Un...onal-Statement

From Manchester:
Academic achievements/subjects studied at level 3 (AS and A2 levels, BTECs etc.) – Write about your academic achievements. What academic skills and knowledge do you have that will prepare you to succeed in your chosen subject?
http://documents.manchester.ac.uk/di...px?DocID=49108

From Warwick
How are you qualified for the course?
This may be about your prior work experience or evidence of research or reading in the subject area. Your personal and academic skills, achievements and how they relate to the course are also good stories to tell.
https://warwick.ac.uk/study/postgrad...nal-statement/

From Exeter:
What to include:
1. reasons for applying for a particular degree(s) and how this relates to current/previous studies and experiences such as extra curricular activities and interests (this is particularly important when they’re applying for a subject that they have not studied before).
2. reasons for the choice of subjects taken at A level or equivalent
3. what the student can offer - evidence of a willingness/desire to learn at a higher level and evidence that they understand what is required to study the course, eg if applying for psychology courses, show that they know how scientific the subject is
4. details of relevant activities and achievements. Any of the following might be appropriate to include but students should consider carefully and only include those which are relevant. Instead of merely listing these they should demonstrate skills and knowledge gained and note how they will apply this to their future studies.

https://www.exeter.ac.uk/media/unive..._Sept_2011.pdf

Some perhaps less reliable sources:
UCAS Personal Statement builder:
Do your current or previous studies relate to the course(s) that you have chosen? If so, how?
https://www.ucas.com/file/4261/download?token=u7I6M9Q5

From some random Cambridge PS tutor company:
6. How should I talk about my other A-level subjects?

Your subjects will be listed alongside your personal statement in your UCAS application, however talking about other subjects can provide further insight into your chosen course. For instance, if you are studying English Literature and you have taken Classics, you may want to talk about the translation of texts such as the Aeneid, and how is has provided you with the understanding of classical influence in English Literature. Your Personal Statement should be completely grounded in your subject, however if you can find an interesting and relevant way in which to weave another subject in, it can be an interesting way to stand out.

https://oxbridgeapplications.com/blo...nsand-answers/

Hopefully that's comprehensive enough. The skills gained during A levels and reasons behind choosing those subjects are valuable to hear about. It shows that the applicant has chosen their A levels carefully, and is perhaps also careful in their choice of university subject; it shows that they are aware of the skills they ned and have chosen subjects that will further those skills. All of this can be achieved without ever mentioned A levels of course, but it doesn't seem like a bad idea to me to include some details as to why you chose the A levels you have done and how they are proving useful in furthering you along the path to study whatever it is you want to study. It's similar at postgrad level: postgrad personal statements often want information as to how the Bachelor's (or equiv) has been relevant to you doing a postgrad.

At the end of the day, if your A levels are not relevant in some way to your course, then don't mention it. But if they are e.g. the way that both Eng Lit and History are to law, then make use of that. And if you can link a subject that has no obvious link, like 3D, then that just makes you stand out.
Thank you so much It's defo comprehensive - I really appreciate it as I want to give better advice from what I already know. Ohhh I understand what you are getting at and I defo agree. For your very last point, I understand what you are getting at but I find if you force the link together I think it wouldnt be good. However, your link with the EPQ would make sense and more personal, which I believe will stand out as well. I think making it very personal to your application will make it stand out, in my opinion. Anyways, thank you again
1
reply
Quick-use
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#16
Report 3 weeks ago
#16
(Original post by tinos21)
At the end of the day, if your A levels are not relevant in some way to your course, then don't mention it. But if they are e.g. the way that both Eng Lit and History are to law, then make use of that. And if you can link a subject that has no obvious link, like 3D, then that just makes you stand out.
I think this is what you could've said from the beginning. It seemed like you were arguing that A level subjects had to link to the chosen degree subject. In any case, thanks a lot for the great research and evidence! You final point (which I've quoted) was also very eloquently said; I'm sure it'll be of good use to future applicants. :rambo:
2
reply
Lancaster Student Ambassador
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#17
Report 3 weeks ago
#17
(Original post by Esmerussell)
Hi i'm planning on applying for law at uni and am going to take English literature, history and Art and Design: 3D design as well as an EPQ. do you reckon these a levels will be alright considering 3d is considered 'soft'? im not exactly applying for oxbridge and LSE but i love the idea of somewhere like UEA or lancaster.
Thank you for any help
Hi @Esmerussell,

It's great to hear that you are considering Lancaster!

Currently, on the Law website, it states the entry requirements are ABB for undergraduate Law, without requiring particular subjects. However, both English Literature Literature and History are both excellent, essay-based subjects which will provide you with a strong basis of argument and critical thinking.

If you are worried about taking Art and Design, I would recommend getting in contact with the department on this address ([email protected]) or chat to current Law students on UniBuddy to get an idea of what A-Levels they studied.

We also have an online Open Day today 10-2pm (11th July), where you are able to chat the departments individually. This might be a good way of getting in touch with the department quickly and more informally!

If you have any other questions, I'd be happy to help!

Maria
1st year English Literature, Creative Writing and Practice (placement year)
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What are you most likely to do if you don't get the grades you were expecting?

Go through Clearing (67)
40.36%
Take autumn exams (56)
33.73%
Look for a job (4)
2.41%
Consider an apprenticeship (5)
3.01%
Take a year out (24)
14.46%
Something else (let us know in the thread!) (10)
6.02%

Watched Threads

View All