As.1997
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I wanted to gain some insight into what type of specialties in medicine in the UK are short of staff. Could you please advise and possibly refer to any possible websites I could read so I can gain a better understanding.
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Democracy
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(Original post by As.1997)
I wanted to gain some insight into what type of specialties in medicine in the UK are short of staff. Could you please advise and possibly refer to any possible websites I could read so I can gain a better understanding.
There's a shortage of doctors in general but the three specialties which are most often described as being particularly short are GP, psychiatry and A&E. A longer list is available here (page 3):

https://www.bma.org.uk/media/1667/bm...t-jan-2019.pdf
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As.1997
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(Original post by Democracy)
There's a shortage of doctors in general but the three specialties which are most often described as being particularly short are GP, psychiatry and A&E. A longer list is available here (page 3):

https://www.bma.org.uk/media/1667/bm...t-jan-2019.pdf
Thank you!
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(Original post by As.1997)
I wanted to gain some insight into what type of specialties in medicine in the UK are short of staff. Could you please advise and possibly refer to any possible websites I could read so I can gain a better understanding.
There's shortage in virtually every speciality, the BMA's list is not comprehensive. For example, the Royal College of Radiologists says the current vacancy rate for clinical oncologists is 10%, with that increasing to 19% if you factor in overtime hours currently being worked by burnt out staff. That is current - the forecast is for a massive surge in cancer treatment demand over the next decade, with treatments getting better and more complex and therefore higher workload!

https://www.rcr.ac.uk/system/files/p...y-findings.pdf

https://www.rcr.ac.uk/posts/new-rcr-...s-have-stalled


In addition, some deficiencies are being masked by the use of non-doctor staff in positions that used to be doctors (like specialist nurses, pharmacists, physician associates). That is true in virtually every speciality. It is sometimes a good thing, but often done out of desperation if we're honest and not an ideal thing at all.
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(Original post by nexttime)
There's shortage in virtually every speciality, the BMA's list is not comprehensive. For example, the Royal College of Radiologists says the current vacancy rate for clinical oncologists is 10%, with that increasing to 19% if you factor in overtime hours currently being worked by burnt out staff. That is current - the forecast is for a massive surge in cancer treatment demand over the next decade, with treatments getting better and more complex and therefore higher workload!

https://www.rcr.ac.uk/system/files/p...y-findings.pdf

https://www.rcr.ac.uk/posts/new-rcr-...s-have-stalled


In addition, some deficiencies are being masked by the use of non-doctor staff in positions that used to be doctors (like specialist nurses, pharmacists, physician associates). That is true in virtually every speciality. It is sometimes a good thing, but often done out of desperation if we're honest and not an ideal thing at all.
Amazing, thank you!

Can I ask what prompted you to look into oncology doctors? Is it an area of your interest or was it the first speciality that came to mind and looked up.
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(Original post by As.1997)
Amazing, thank you!

Can I ask what prompted you to look into oncology doctors? Is it an area of your interest or was it the first speciality that came to mind and looked up.
I noticed, mainly because when I was applying, the RCR released this saying they needed to recruit 138 per year. This would be good for me - more chance of getting in. The number of jobs they actually released that year... 35. I was pretty angry

Its a similar story for virtually all specialities though. I know neurology is incredibly short, for instance. And of course this is all pre-covid, both in terms of the huge backlog created and all the extra precautions slowing everything down massively with no respite in sight.
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As.1997
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(Original post by nexttime)
I noticed, mainly because when I was applying, the RCR released this saying they needed to recruit 138 per year. This would be good for me - more chance of getting in. The number of jobs they actually released that year... 35. I was pretty angry

Its a similar story for virtually all specialities though. I know neurology is incredibly short, for instance. And of course this is all pre-covid, both in terms of the huge backlog created and all the extra precautions slowing everything down massively with no respite in sight.
I am secretly quite happy there are empty vacancies ; )
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(Original post by nexttime)
... I know neurology is incredibly short, for instance...
It'll get worse when the specialty switches from Group 2 to Group 1... because in shortening the training years (from 5 to 4), they'd have to reduce the training numbers by 20% too. And not forgetting those people who chose neurology because of no gen med on-calls.

(Original post by As.1997)
I am secretly quite happy there are empty vacancies ; )
Only at consultant levels, there's still a bottleneck at specialty training. For example as @nexttime said our specialty is incredibly short of cons, yet registrar training is still competitive at between 2.5 to 4 applicants to one place for the last 5-6 years; and last year the competition ratio for specialty training in Clinical Oncology it was 2.5 to 1 and for Med Oncology it was 3.68 to 1.
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(Original post by As.1997)
I am secretly quite happy there are empty vacancies ; )
Perhaps you misunderstand? The RCR said there should be 138 training jobs. They only released 35, so competition was a lot higher.
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(Original post by nexttime)
Perhaps you misunderstand? The RCR said there should be 138 training jobs. They only released 35, so competition was a lot higher.
Ah crickey, I did misunderstand
That doesn't look too appealing...
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It'll get worse when the specialty switches from Group 2 to Group 1... because in shortening the training years (from 5 to 4), they'd have to reduce the training numbers by 20% too. And not forgetting those people who chose neurology because of no gen med on-calls.



Only at consultant levels, there's still a bottleneck at specialty training. For example as @nexttime said our specialty is incredibly short of cons, yet registrar training is still competitive at between 2.5 to 4 applicants to one place for the last 5-6 years; and last year the competition ratio for specialty training in Clinical Oncology it was 2.5 to 1 and for Med Oncology it was 3.68 to 1.
"not forgetting those people who chose neurology because of no gen med on-calls." -- this is a bit beyond my knowledge so may require it to be said in layman's terms, please.
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(Original post by As.1997)
"not forgetting those people who chose neurology because of no gen med on-calls." -- this is a bit beyond my knowledge so may require it to be said in layman's terms, please.
Previously (as in upto and including 2020/21 starters) neurology specialty training is 5 years, and you only do on-calls for neurology hence you do 5 years' training of pure neurology after 2 years of core medical training (CMT).

From 2021/22 onwards, to training in neurology you have to 3 years of internal medical training (IMT taking over CMT) including 1 year of general medical on-calls during IMT. Then 4 years of neurology specialty training which must include 12 months of general medical on-calls. So that's 3 years of neurology compared to 5 years previously.

General medical on-call shifts (i.e. you cover all of medicine during this time) have a bad rep for being high intensity and long / unsocial working hours.
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(Original post by ecolier)
Previously (as in upto and including 2020/21 starters) neurology specialty training is 5 years, and you only do on-calls for neurology hence you do 5 years' training of pure neurology after 2 years of core medical training (CMT).

From 2021/22 onwards, to training in neurology you have to 3 years of internal medical training (IMT taking over CMT) including 1 year of general medical on-calls during IMT. Then 4 years of neurology specialty training which must include 12 months of general medical on-calls. So that's 3 years of neurology compared to 5 years previously.

General medical on-call shifts (i.e. you cover all of medicine during this time) have a bad rep for being high intensity and long / unsocial working hours.
I see why it's not very attractive. Thank you for elaborating. You've enticed my curiosity, are you a consultant in oncology, if you don't mind me asking.
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(Original post by As.1997)
I see why it's not very attractive. Thank you for elaborating. You've enticed my curiosity, are you a consultant in oncology, if you don't mind me asking.
No, I am working in neurology. I only jumped in because @nexttime mentioned us.

@nexttime is the one training in oncology.
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(Original post by ecolier)
No, I am working in neurology. I only jumped in because @nexttime mentioned us.

@nexttime is the one training in oncology.
That's really cool. I'm quite interested in a few specialties (max fax, oncology - haematological malignancy) and taking on research or perhaps lecturing alongside it. I think that's largely because I've spent considerable time working or gained experience in those specialties. Though not as a doctor but as a nurse assistant.
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