Would I have a chance to work at a magic circle law firm ?

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ejz17
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Say for example I am not capable of getting into a big London law firm like magic circle straight out of uni due to a poor academic background, would it be a possibility to work in a national or regional firm first and then move up to working in a big london firm?
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username1625799
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(Original post by ejz17)
Say for example I am not capable of getting into a big London law firm like magic circle straight out of uni due to a poor academic background, would it be a possibility to work in a national or regional firm first and then move up to working in a big london firm?
if you get enough experience it'd probably be a lateral move or a step down, so your salary would probably be lower. As long as you have a 2:1 I reckon you have a good chance of moving into a magic circle firm later on when you have good valuable experience
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TheMandalorian
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You shouldn’t go work for a regional law firm just because you couldn’t make it into a city firm. Regional firms know there are a lot of people who try to do this, which is why one question they always ask you is why you want to work for a regional firm and not a city law firm. If you can’t answer this question then forget about ever getting a job with a regional firm. Do your research first on how regional firms are different.

Your pay would be significantly lower and you won’t be closing million pound deals. The work you do in regional firms is low value compared to the magic circle firms. But if you are really interested in a niche law specialism then regional law firms are quite suitable for that.

Regional law firms is not for everyone. You can always still get a job in a city law firm as a paralegal and work your way up from there. Many city law firms offer their paralegals training contracts and some firms exclusively recruit trainees from their paralegals.
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999tigger
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It depends how bad, what experience, state opf the market, who with. It is possible if you believe the MC is the nirvana of the legal world.
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Johnny ~
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(Original post by ejz17)
Say for example I am not capable of getting into a big London law firm like magic circle straight out of uni due to a poor academic background, would it be a possibility to work in a national or regional firm first and then move up to working in a big london firm?
From the other thread - the combo of (the equivalent of) Cs at GCSE + DDM for BTEC + the university you'll end up going to will be highly atypical for MC firms. I don't know of anyone with that kind of profile at one of these firms. You can try to offset this by gaining (several years of) professional work experience in an office environment, but that would probably just make you a more competitive candidate for City firms in general, not specifically the MC firms.

It is entirely possible for someone to start regional and move up to an MC firm, though it really depends on the practice area and the regional firm you're training at.

Edit: I'm not entirely sure as to why you're aiming for big London firms right now when your academics are what they are and you don't have much/any insight into what they do. Use your time at university to find out more about the sector.
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ejz17
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(Original post by Johnny ~)
From the other thread - the combo of (the equivalent of) Cs at GCSE + DDM for BTEC + the university you'll end up going to will be highly atypical for MC firms. I don't know of anyone with that kind of profile at one of these firms. You can try to offset this by gaining (several years of) professional work experience in an office environment, but that would probably just make you a more competitive candidate for City firms in general, not specifically the MC firms.

It is entirely possible for someone to start regional and move up to an MC firm, though it really depends on the practice area and the regional firm you're training at.

Edit: I'm not entirely sure as to why you're aiming for big London firms right now when your academics are what they are and you don't have much/any insight into what they do. Use your time at university to find out more about the sector.
I would like to work in a city firm in London, it does not have to be a magic city firm but that is something that I aspire to.
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ejz17
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I dont specifically think I have to go to magic circle but I would like to work in a big law firm in London, Im not entirely sure what area of Law I would like to pursue just yet.
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Johnny ~
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(Original post by ejz17)
I would like to work in a city firm in London, it does not have to be a magic city firm but that is something that I aspire to.
You might want to find people from your university with a similar profile to you who went on to work at a commercial law firm in London. You can do this through Linkedin or (once you start your course) through your university's career service.
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jacketpotato
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If you did qualify into the regional office of a national firm or a good regional firm, it is very possible to move to London later on. Lots of people do this.

But I wouldn't assume that getting a TC at a good regional firm is any easier than getting a TC at a good London firm. The best national and regional firms are still very competitive and you will still need excellent academics.
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ejz17
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(Original post by jacketpotato)
If you did qualify into the regional office of a national firm or a good regional firm, it is very possible to move to London later on. Lots of people do this.

But I wouldn't assume that getting a TC at a good regional firm is any easier than getting a TC at a good London firm. The best national and regional firms are still very competitive and you will still need excellent academ
The grades i got for gcse are 5s and 4s and my predicted fir my extended diploma is DDM. If i were to get a first or a 2:1 in my Law LLB at uni of reading what level of law firm would be most realistic to go to ?
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lilguy100
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(Original post by ejz17)
The grades i got for gcse are 5s and 4s and my predicted fir my extended diploma is DDM. If i were to get a first or a 2:1 in my Law LLB at uni of reading what level of law firm would be most realistic to go to
You dont have A-levels and as far as im aware most MC and most silver circle firms require AAB-ABB to even apply, although possible to find some which i think it would be best to not look at such firms for now. im not a lawyer so take what I say with a pinch of salt.
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Johnny ~
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(Original post by lilguy100)
You dont have A-levels and as far as im aware most MC and most silver circle firms require AAB-ABB to even apply, although possible to find some which i think it would be best to not look at such firms for now. im not a lawyer so take what I say with a pinch of salt.
The A-level minimum requirements are for those who sat A-levels. This do not mean that only those who have sat A-levels are eligible to apply, as that would exclude every other qualification/diploma out there. It's why many firms are expressing their minimum requirements in terms of UCAS points (and even then they will still be happy to e.g. consider people with another country's high school diploma). I also know of people with less tradititional or academically rigorous qualifications (BTEC, Access to HE) who have still secured interviews and offers.
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lilguy100
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(Original post by Johnny ~)
The A-level minimum requirements are for those who sat A-levels. This do not mean that only those who have sat A-levels are eligible to apply, as that would exclude every other qualification/diploma out there. It's why many firms are expressing their minimum requirements in terms of UCAS points (and even then they will still be happy to e.g. consider people with another country's high school diploma). I also know of people with less tradititional or academically rigorous qualifications (BTEC, Access to HE) who have still secured interviews and offers.
Ah i see, well that is why i said to take what i say with a pinch of salt . although, am i correct in that OP would be quite disadvantaged by not taking A-levels in applying to MC and SC firms?
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