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    Further maths isn't required by Bristol.

    I got in with Maths, Music and English Language (AAB)... so there you go. Kinda puts a dampener on everything, dunnit

    :p:
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    Maths, Further Maths

    And some more maths if you're interested.
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    (Original post by tommm)
    Oh, and if I recall correctly there was someone on this forum who wanted to do computer science at university but hadn't done maths, so he took a year out so that he could do A-level maths so he could get some offers from good universities.
    That was possibly me...
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    (Original post by EvenStevens)
    That was possibly me...
    I thought that too. Mega famous, Steve.
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    (Original post by Introspectre)
    Hey, I had an offer from Bristol for AAB and I don't do Further Maths. I was also offered deferred entry with ABB...
    Sorry, I should have made it clear that those were the 'standard entry requirement' with each of those unis for the 08 cycle... obviously, if you are really clever or they really want to have you, even places like Oxbridge would give out offers like EEE and other places could give out offers that is lower then the standard entry requirment... hope this makes things clearer....
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    (Original post by trance addict)
    Theres so many girl comp scis on this forum, i'm sure something must be wrong with TSR :p:

    (i'm such a sexist :ninja:)
    :hmmm:

    I would say maths, although i didn't do maths or physics and I'm doing fine.

    I would also recommend some sort of buisness studies as some of our modules have been related to that, also learning how to design things is really useful (like when doing interfaces for programmes you have made) so media related a levels are good as well.

    In saying this, I'm doing comp sci with Media & Photography A2 and a ICT Vocational AS :rolleyes:

    Obviously my course is slightly more designey than basic straight forward comp sci, but i did loads of comp sci modules in the first and second year, and very rarely needed any form of maths knowledge other than binary etc.
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    Networks and Web Development is nowhere near Computer Science; especially in maths content.
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    I would have thought maths and computing would be minimum for computer science.. but i would suggest you check out the universitys you wish to apply to they may be different of course.
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    (Original post by Don.k)
    I would have thought maths and computing would be minimum for computer science.. but i would suggest you check out the universitys you wish to apply to they may be different of course.
    I've not encountered any unis that specify Computing A-level. Actually, a lot of them prefer the applicants not to have it as they won't have any bad habits when it comes to programming languages and stuff.
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    most unis just want maths at a A or B by A2. And the other 2 subjects dont really matter, as long as you get what is required by them.

    By most unis i dont mean oxbridge or imperial.
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    What you need is A-level Maths. What you could do with is A-level Further Maths and/or Physics (I'm doing F. Maths but no Physics but bleh.) As far as Maths is concerned, do as many of the Decision Mathematics modules as you can (on OCR there are only two: D1 and D2). If the option is not given, don't worry about it too much, but doing D1 and D2 would be beneficial.
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    Maths, Further Maths, Physics, Computing
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    I studied Maths, Biology and Psychology, and now studying computer science.
    In my opinion, you need a technical subject, e.g. maths, physics, to help u think logically. this is vital in programming.
    If you interested in cybersecuity, u will need maths.
    Psychology has also been useful, especially in requirements engineering, usability evaluation and user experience design (research, analysis and bringing up solutions). Only those who do psychology will understand its benefits!
    Biology has not been useful, although it has gained me knowledge outside my field of study, which is beneficial and makes me different from everyone. However, it will e useful in bio tech, e.g. bio metrics, etc.

    Computing is a massive field; it depends what field your interested in:
    Software - Maths, Psychology
    Hardware / Networking - Physics
    Cybersecuirty -Maths, Physics, Psychology
    Business computing - Maths, Business/Economics/Finance, Psychology
    Bioinformatics - Maths/Physics, Biology
    Robotics - Maths, Physics

    ICT A-Level is not beneficial. Computer science A-Level is more beneficial.

    I chose my A-Levels before knowing what I wanted to study, but I think you should choose
    Maths/Physics+Business/Economics/Finance+Psychology

    You must choose Maths/Physics and science-based courses, such as the ones named above.
    You may also find leaving "doors" open by choosing a less relevant course may keep you on the safe side if you want to change course. Also, choosing one irrelevant subject (e.g. biology, chemistry, politics) could gain you knowledge that is not related to your course, which makes you seem less geeky and more interesting! But it's completely up to you!
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    Maths
    Further Maths
    Physics
    Computing
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    (Original post by Harry-Potter)
    I studied Maths, Biology and Psychology, and now studying computer science.
    In my opinion, you need a technical subject, e.g. maths, physics, to help u think logically. this is vital in programming.
    If you interested in cybersecuity, u will need maths.
    Psychology has also been useful, especially in requirements engineering, usability evaluation and user experience design (research, analysis and bringing up solutions). Only those who do psychology will understand its benefits!
    Biology has not been useful, although it has gained me knowledge outside my field of study, which is beneficial and makes me different from everyone. However, it will e useful in bio tech, e.g. bio metrics, etc.

    Computing is a massive field; it depends what field your interested in:
    Software - Maths, Psychology
    Hardware / Networking - Physics
    Cybersecuirty -Maths, Physics, Psychology
    Business computing - Maths, Business/Economics/Finance, Psychology
    Bioinformatics - Maths/Physics, Biology
    Robotics - Maths, Physics

    ICT A-Level is not beneficial.
    Computer science A-Level is more beneficial.

    I chose my A-Levels before knowing what I wanted to study, but I think you should choose
    Maths/Physics+Business/Economics/Finance+Psychology

    You must choose Maths/Physics and science-based courses, such as the ones named above.
    You may also find leaving "doors" open by choosing a less relevant course may keep you on the safe side if you want to change course. Also, choosing one irrelevant subject (e.g. biology, chemistry, politics) could gain you knowledge that is not related to your course, which makes you seem less geeky and more interesting! But it's completely up to you!
    Agree with much of what you say above though I don't agree that you have to do all science based subjects at A level and I definitely don't agree with you stating "ICT A level is not beneficial". By saying that, some students will read that it is worthless or not helpful and I think you are wrong. I say that as a parent, as a teacher of ICT/maths and as a former programmer and senior analyst with several large organisations.

    There is always something in every A level that can come in useful at a later date and ICT is no exception. My son is just about to complete a computer science degree having done A levels in Maths, ICT, Geography and Economics/Business. Not your usual subjects for moving into computer science. It has not hindered him in the slightest. He had offers from every uni he applied to and has done a placement year. He already has an excellent software developer job lined up for when he finishes. His dissertation was a more in-depth study and report similar to what he had had to produce at A level ICT (the full development life cycle is relevant whether you are a doing an ICT based project or a technical programming task - you still have to write reports, analyse the problem, design, create and test the solution etc. etc) and that is the same in the workplace too.

    As a teacher we would always advise students of suitable subject combinations for certain degree intentions but having done ICT is not a disadvantage or a waste of time. And many uni's don't expect students to have done any computer science before arriving so assume they don't know much. Very few have it listed as a required subject. There are a lot of schools that don't offer it - we don't.

    I agree maths helps, particularly decision maths, but having good written skills is an advantage too and students can get this from subjects like ICT, business etc. It helps to have an understanding of how the real world works.

    I find what you have to say about psychology interesting though, and also agree that it does depend on what branch of computing you see yourself moving into.
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    For Oxbridge - A*A*A, Maths, Further Maths
    For other top unis - A*AA-ABB Maths, usually Further Maths
    Below - BBB-CCC Maybe Maths

    Just remember, Maths is the most important subject here
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    Agree with you - maths is the most important subject for computer science. I was just putting the point across that ICT is not worthless and it doesn't have to be all science subjects to get on in computer science.
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    Hi,
    Let me re-word what I should have said.
    ICT is useful but many universities say to do A-Level computer science, and do not accept ICT, unless you did Maths/Further Maths/Physics.
    Thanks
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    If you are gunning for Cambridge or imperial, maths and further maths are essential, they say further maths is preferred but if you dont do it you probably dont have a hope of getting an offer. Physics is also great to do but do Maths, further maths, physics + something else you like. If you arent willing to do further maths because you deem it to hard and too much maths, then you havent researched computing properly, the maths content in those courses is massive, you cover in 2 years what a first year undergraduate mathematician would, the only courses with higher maths contents apart from maths itself are physics and engineering.
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    I only managed B in maths GCSE after a lot of hard work so I don t think I can take maths at A levels . I however love computing and English language . Would it be good option to take computer sc with business at A levels ?
 
 
 

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