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Law or History/Politics degree?! watch

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    Hi,

    A few weeks ago I was dead set on doing law at uni, however now after talking to lots of people it seems it might turn out to be a really boring/dry degree?! I've none lots of work experience with both soliciters and barristers, which I found interesting, but I think I liked it not because of the law but because it was in London!

    I now think perhaps a History or History and Politics degree would be more interesting and varied. Is anyone doing it? If so how are you finding it?

    Thanks for any help/comments!
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    I recommend Media Studies.
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    i was planning on doing alw but now i am dead set on History and Politics

    History and Politics FTW!!! then I am going to do a GDL and BVC. Maybe you should try that route:confused:
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    Personally, I would say History.
    It's a broader subject, generally, and if you do History, you can branch out in to Politics and/ or Law later on fairly easily, whereas if you start out in Politics or Law, it's harder to get back in to History.
    I think History is a fantastic base for most things you want to progress into, especially Politics or Law.
    I was considering Law but chose History for the above reasons
    My ex History teacher, actually... he was a History teacher for a good few years, and at 28 he's decided to branch out and go to Law School in London.
    So it shows it's possible.
    You could also do work experience in Law and/ or Politics during a History degree. If you don't like it, no harm done. If you do, you know that they're possibilities in either potential future degree progressions, job opportunities, etc.
    I think start broad, and narrow it down based on the interests you find yourself developing.
    And obviously all this depends on what you enjoy. Good luck! x
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    to say that a law degree stops you from getting anywhere - apart from being a doctor or something very specific - is absolute rubbish. a law degree is one of the most respected degrees there is and you can easily go into history or politics following law - just look at how many prime ministers used to be solicitors or barristers! as for law being a boring degree, i was worried about that when i started but it's actually really current and always changing. criminal law for example is really interesting and you should get to do advocacy which is like mock trials. i have friends who do HP, let me know if you still think law is the boring subject when you're knee deep in primary sources about the feudal system!!
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    Thanks for your help...I think the GDL sounds a good option but I'm still hovering around a Law degree!

    Does anyone have any advice for the HAT test?

    Thanks again for any help
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    meaning the History Aptitude Test for oxford applications
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    CV Helper
    Originally posted by malleablegrace
    Personally, I would say History.
    It's a broader subject, generally, and if you do History, you can branch out in to Politics and/ or Law later on fairly easily, whereas if you start out in Politics or Law, it's harder to get back in to History.
    .......

    You could also do work experience in Law and/ or Politics during a History degree. If you don't like it, no harm done. If you do, you know that they're possibilities in either potential future degree progressions, job opportunities, etc.
    I think start broad, and narrow it down based on the interests you find yourself developing.
    And obviously all this depends on what you enjoy. Good luck
    ! x
    Great advice ^^. I say History ftw, possibly joint honours with Politics. Do the work experience and internships that go with it and you can always do a Law conversion, whereas a 'History conversion' (if there is such a thing) may be hard to come by.
    Good luck
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    Yes I agree with Ghost Grey- you may be better off doing History/Politics then a Law conversion course as a) doing it the other way may be a bit weird b) if you for some reason decide that law isn't the career for you, then you won't have wasted 3/4 years doing a law degree, and can then specialise in something else.
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    History, Law, Politics. With either you cannot lose. I know lots of people who have gone into law with or without an LLB. If you can secure a 2.1 in a non llb you'll easily get into a conversion course etc.

    Neither degree will limit you unless you go for something specific. Looking at all the people I know on my course (I study Politics) for internships this year (BBC, CNN, IBM, Merril Lynch, ITN, DowJones, PR) and the graduate destinations (Masters: LSE, Oxford, UCL, SOAS, Berkeley, Grad: CNN, BBC, Civil Service, Think Tanks, Law conversion: at least 10). You won't be limiting yourself in any way. The same is very true for history.

    Pick the subject you'll enjoy for 3 years and have the best chance of getting a 2.1 in.
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    History and Politics, a winning combination.
 
 
 
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