kelpic
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I've heard someone say that they're 50% engineers - 50% doctors....or it might have been 70% engineers and 30% doctors....which one would be more accurate?

(I'm asking about the kind of biomedical engineers that deal with tissue eng, genetic eng, and medical biotechnology rather than the kind that deal with medical devices)
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stereotypeasian
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Lewis T K maybe you could give some insight to OP ?
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kelpic
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(Original post by stereotypeasian)
Lewis T K maybe you could give some insight to OP ?
Should I PM him or will he be notified that you've tagged him (or whatever it's called)?
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stereotypeasian
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(Original post by kelpic)
Should I PM him or will he be notified that you've tagged him (or whatever it's called)?
they should be notified that I just tagged them
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Lewis T K
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(Original post by stereotypeasian)
Lewis T K maybe you could give some insight to OP ?
Thanks for the tag. I guess the short answer is that we are 100% engineers. We do have a solid knowledge of pathophysiology and epidemiology of medical issues, but our primary focus is the engineering principles behind this. For an example we look at flow rate and turbulence in stenosis of heart values in order to come up with a concept for an artificial value. In regards to tissue and cell engineering, this is a more specialised form of biomedical engineering that does have a greater degree of biology knowledge needed. Many biomedical engineers tend to follow this career path as a postgrad either as an MRes or PhD. Once again though, the biomedical engineers primary focus would be the engineering side (in this case and example could be changing of specific microenvironment density with the use of nanoparticles to increase or decrease the adhesion rate of cells)
However that being said, many biomedical engineers, myself included, have moved more towards a medical and medical research career as our background is highly transferable, but I would not say we are the same as med students at all during or after undergrad as we do not do any OSCE exams and do a lot more computer programming and analysis than actual practical work.
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kelpic
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(Original post by Lewis T K)
Thanks for the tag. I guess the short answer is that we are 100% engineers. We do have a solid knowledge of pathophysiology and epidemiology of medical issues, but our primary focus is the engineering principles behind this. For an example we look at flow rate and turbulence in stenosis of heart values in order to come up with a concept for an artificial value. In regards to tissue and cell engineering, this is a more specialised form of biomedical engineering that does have a greater degree of biology knowledge needed. Many biomedical engineers tend to follow this career path as a postgrad either as an MRes or PhD. Once again though, the biomedical engineers primary focus would be the engineering side (in this case and example could be changing of specific microenvironment density with the use of nanoparticles to increase or decrease the adhesion rate of cells)
However that being said, many biomedical engineers, myself included, have moved more towards a medical and medical research career as our background is highly transferable, but I would not say we are the same as med students at all during or after undergrad as we do not do any OSCE exams and do a lot more computer programming and analysis than actual practical work.
Do they know much about diagnosing conditions? What about treating them?

And another question, do biomedical engs. know more about biochem, organic chem, and molecular biology than doctors? I've heard it said that biomeds know more about molecular/microscopic physiology while doctors know more about 'macroscopic' physiology. Is that the case?
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Lewis T K
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(Original post by kelpic)
Do they know much about diagnosing conditions? What about treating them?

And another question, do biomedical engs. know more about biochem, organic chem, and molecular biology than doctors? I've heard it said that biomeds know more about molecular/microscopic physiology while doctors know more about 'macroscopic' physiology. Is that the case?
We do not do any diagnosis, you need to be a doctor to do this. We do learn about diagnosing conditions but purely for our own knowledge and to aid in our own study. We do learn about certain treatments, but only when we are trying to find a new course of treatment involving engineering, this is getting quite big with TDD. I wouldn’t say we know more or less that clinicians in regards to biochem, I guess this depends a lot upon the specialty that we choose, such as a pathologist would most likely have a greater understanding of cellular changes than most biomedical engineers. Also when we look at macroscopic and microscopic alterations we will mostly look at the mathematic and physical changes along side physiological, such as free energy distribution and density variations in osteoporosis.
I don’t really think you can compare the two professions, we do have similar expertise and knowledge, but we apply it in quite different ways, I guess that’s why we are becoming more involved in multi disciplinary teams.
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kelpic
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(Original post by Lewis T K)
We do not do any diagnosis, you need to be a doctor to do this. We do learn about diagnosing conditions but purely for our own knowledge and to aid in our own study. We do learn about certain treatments, but only when we are trying to find a new course of treatment involving engineering, this is getting quite big with TDD. I wouldn’t say we know more or less that clinicians in regards to biochem, I guess this depends a lot upon the specialty that we choose, such as a pathologist would most likely have a greater understanding of cellular changes than most biomedical engineers. Also when we look at macroscopic and microscopic alterations we will mostly look at the mathematic and physical changes along side physiological, such as free energy distribution and density variations in osteoporosis.
I don’t really think you can compare the two professions, we do have similar expertise and knowledge, but we apply it in quite different ways, I guess that’s why we are becoming more involved in multi disciplinary teams.
So do you learn about diagnosing on the degree courses you do or do you choose to learn about it yourself because it's helpful for the work you do?

With regards to tissue and genetic engineering, what's the job market like in those fields?
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(Original post by kelpic)
So do you learn about diagnosing on the degree courses you do or do you choose to learn about it yourself because it's helpful for the work you do?

With regards to tissue and genetic engineering, what's the job market like in those fields?
We learn about diagnosis on our course, but not to the same level that a med student will.

Tissue and cell engineering is a very up and coming market, actually biomedical engineering is overall. For jobs you could go into research and development testing and devising new treatments which involve tissue engineering like in cancer treatments. One I’ve recently heard of that looked very interesting was the alteration of HER-2 receptors in breast cancer. You also go into industry making and refining tissue and genetic engineering products that are currently approved. I personally think that TDD is going to be the biggest thing in biomedical engineering in the next few years
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kelpic
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(Original post by Lewis T K)
We learn about diagnosis on our course, but not to the same level that a med student will.

Tissue and cell engineering is a very up and coming market, actually biomedical engineering is overall. For jobs you could go into research and development testing and devising new treatments which involve tissue engineering like in cancer treatments. One I’ve recently heard of that looked very interesting was the alteration of HER-2 receptors in breast cancer. You also go into industry making and refining tissue and genetic engineering products that are currently approved. I personally think that TDD is going to be the biggest thing in biomedical engineering in the next few years
Are there enough jobs out there atm though?
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(Original post by kelpic)
Are there enough jobs out there atm though?
In the UK, there isn’t too many jobs atm, this may change in the decade or so. Worldwide there are more jobs available
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(Original post by Lewis T K)
In the UK, there isn’t too many jobs atm, this may change in the decade or so. Worldwide there are more jobs available
Where? The US? Where else?
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(Original post by kelpic)
Where? The US? Where else?
The US, Scandinavia, Switzerland, Germany and Dubai is where I have seen the most jobs posted
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(Original post by Lewis T K)
The US, Scandinavia, Switzerland, Germany and Dubai is where I have seen the most jobs posted
And one last question....what is the difference between biological engineering and biotechnology?
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Lewis T K
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(Original post by kelpic)
And one last question....what is the difference between biological engineering and biotechnology?
That’s quite a good question, I guess I would look at it being that biological engineering is what you hope to achieve, and you do this through the use of biotechnology.
Biomedical engineering is quite a broad spectrum. It encompasses everything from biomaterials to tissue and cell engineering. I really do suggest it for those who are interested in medicine, medical innovation and technology
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(Original post by Lewis T K)
That’s quite a good question, I guess I would look at it being that biological engineering is what you hope to achieve, and you do this through the use of biotechnology.
Biomedical engineering is quite a broad spectrum. It encompasses everything from biomaterials to tissue and cell engineering. I really do suggest it for those who are interested in medicine, medical innovation and technology
With regards to the first paragraph, can you give me a specific example?
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(Original post by kelpic)
With regards to the first paragraph, can you give me a specific example?
Yeah sure, so if you want to induce a biological change in a tissue, such as causing cell death via hyperthermia (heat), you could achieve this using magnetic nanoparticles what is a form of biotechnology

Cell death by hyperthermia is the biological engineering
The nanoparticles are the biotechnology

Some people refer to genetic or cell engineering as ‘bioengineering’ as well, this can cause a bit confusing
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kelpic
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(Original post by Lewis T K)
Yeah sure, so if you want to induce a biological change in a tissue, such as causing cell death via hyperthermia (heat), you could achieve this using magnetic nanoparticles what is a form of biotechnology

Cell death by hyperthermia is the biological engineering
The nanoparticles are the biotechnology

Some people refer to genetic or cell engineering as ‘bioengineering’ as well, this can cause a bit confusing
So which degree would better in terms of employability, biotechnology or bioengineering?
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(Original post by kelpic)
So which degree would better in terms of employability, biotechnology or bioengineering?
I would think at this moment biotechnology would be, but I think you would do this more as a postgrad after a BEng in biomedical engineering. Means you have a lot of options open to you
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(Original post by Lewis T K)
I would think at this moment biotechnology would be, but I think you would do this more as a postgrad after a BEng in biomedical engineering. Means you have a lot of options open to you
What kind of options? And why study it at postgraduate level?
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