My Physics Teacher doesn't know any Calculus

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blackugo
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My physics teacher doesn't know even the basics of differentiation or integration.
She was completely unaware of most overlaps between the maths syllabus and physics with topics such as simple harmonic motion, circular motion etc despite teaching A-Level physics for a number of years. She was hopeless with logarithms when doing nuclear decay. And she definitely had no clue how to derive any shm equations and nuclear decay equations because she seemingly no maths skill. She supposedly has a physics degree but I heard physics degrees are maths heavy. She has also said that a degree is easier than A-Level. The physics surely gets much harder at University. It did always seem like she memorised things and never had a mathematical understanding of how things worked. She would say she derived equations from the "definitions" by remembering the sentences rather than how to manipulate the equation.

This has really made me question what qualifications she really has. On top of these, she often makes mistakes like saying there are uniform gravitational waves between 2 books. Yes, 2 books. She also once taught that the outer layer of stars was made out of iron and the innermost was hydrogen until she was corrected by someone *cough* *cough*. She also didn't understand that a falling object could have negative acceleration.

What do you think? Is it a common occurrence for A-Level Physics teachers to be unaware of basic A-level maths concepts. Is this teacher a fraud?
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Kk1999
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The same has happened with me and I had to work hard all on my own to clear the exams.
there should be some monitoring or something by the board.
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15Characters...
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I don't think it's that uncommon, I saw a similar but distinct problem when I was doing my A Levels. In my case teachers were pushed into teaching A Level courses that didn't match well with their degree, e.g the "wrong" science or an applied science degree which maybe didn't have much relevant content. My amateur observation was that a net outflow of older and more experienced teachers (a mix of retirements, leaving the profession altogether and changing schools) was only being partially compensated by recruitment of new teachers, who tended to be younger and come from a different sort of academic background. Not sure if this was a peculiarity of my school or more common in the industry.

[I think it's also well worth noting that most of my teachers were excellent, both knowledgeable in the subject and effective at teaching. Even those who weren't great for A Levels were popular with lower years where the material was easier and less specialised. And some of my best teachers had spend significant amounts of time in industry before taking up teaching.]
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uberteknik
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Chronic shortage of Physics teachers:

https://www.reedglobal.com/blog/2020...-overseas-help

https://www.theguardian.com/careers/...ience-shortage

https://www.tes.com/news/6-worrying-...uitment-crisis

"Targets were not met for primary and secondary teachers. The figures for 2019/2020 reveal particularly low rates in recruiting trainee teachers in chemistry, computing, maths, modern foreign languages and physics. Physics was hit hardest, only reaching 43% of the 2019 target; even lower than the 47% achieved in 2018." Reed Employment

"Half of maths and physics teachers quit within five years" Guardian excerpt.

"The NFER's Teacher Labour Market in England Annual Report 2020, based on data collected prior to the Covid-19 pandemic, shows that the recruitment situation has "significantly worsened" for shortage subjects at secondary level, such as physics, maths, modern foreign languages (MFL) and chemistry." Tes website.
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Kk1999
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(Original post by 15Characters...)
I don't think it's that uncommon, I saw a similar but distinct problem when I was doing my A Levels. In my case teachers were pushed into teaching A Level courses that didn't match well with their degree, e.g the "wrong" science or an applied science degree which maybe didn't have much relevant content. My amateur observation was that a net outflow of older and more experienced teachers (a mix of retirements, leaving the profession altogether and changing schools) was only being partially compensated by recruitment of new teachers, who tended to be younger and come from a different sort of academic background. Not sure if this was a peculiarity of my school or more common in the industry.

[I think it's also well worth noting that most of my teachers were excellent, both knowledgeable in the subject and effective at teaching. Even those who weren't great for A Levels were popular with lower years where the material was easier and less specialised. And some of my best teachers had spend significant amounts of time in industry before taking up teaching.]
is there any way we can complain the boards to monitor or check such schools?
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username5243714
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(Original post by Kk1999)
is there any way we can complain the boards to monitor or check such schools?
As far as I'm aware, exam boards have no control over the quality of teaching in a school. That is part of Ofsted's role.
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Kk1999
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(Original post by Lightning720)
As far as I'm aware, exam boards have no control over the quality of teaching in a school. That is part of Ofsted's role.
But the schools are certified right... so how is it possible for them to be certified without standards??
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Reality Check
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(Original post by blackugo)
What do you think? Is it a common occurrence for A-Level Physics teachers to be unaware of basic A-level maths concepts. Is this teacher a fraud?
By saying 'fraud', you misunderstand the situation. You're assuming earlier in your post that she actually has a physics degree. In all likelihood, such is the difficulty in recruiting specialist physics teachers, she's either done a small amount of physics as part of a wider degree, or hasn't actually done physics since A level, and is technically a chemistry teacher who has been roped into teaching physics.

You're being snotty about the wrong person, basically. She probably hates teaching it as much as you hate having it taught by a non-specialist. You should be making your complaint to SLT/Ho6th about why there isn't adequate specialist provision for physics at your school.
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Pigster
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I teach chemistry (in one of the top twenty schools in the country) and I don't have a chemistry degree - none of my modules on my degree were even chemistry.

Even if she did physics, it isn't a given that she has a straight physics degree - it could have been a combined degree.
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mgi
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(Original post by Kk1999)
But the schools are certified right... so how is it possible for them to be certified without standards??
No, you should read some of the previous posts. It is not always about "standards". There is a chronuc shortage of subject qualified chemistry, maths and physics teachers! Graduates in those subjects go elsewhere!
Teaching is actually a crap job in the UK!
You could complain but a school cannot give you what they haven't got!
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Kk1999)
is there any way we can complain the boards to monitor or check such schools?
(Original post by Kk1999)
But the schools are certified right... so how is it possible for them to be certified without standards??
This has got nothing to do with examination boards. Schools are responsible for recruitment, and providing an adequate standard of education. If pupils or parents feel that the provision is inadequate, they need to complain to the Head, Governors or relevant people at the MAT (given that only a very few schools now are LEA).
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mgi
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(Original post by Kk1999)
is there any way we can complain the boards to monitor or check such schools?
no , that would be the school headteacher and Ofsted! lots of well qualified graduates don't want to be teachers. I can't think why?lol
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mgi
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(Original post by uberteknik)
Chronic shortage of Physics teachers:

https://www.reedglobal.com/blog/2020...-overseas-help

https://www.theguardian.com/careers/...ience-shortage

https://www.tes.com/news/6-worrying-...uitment-crisis

"Targets were not met for primary and secondary teachers. The figures for 2019/2020 reveal particularly low rates in recruiting trainee teachers in chemistry, computing, maths, modern foreign languages and physics. Physics was hit hardest, only reaching 43% of the 2019 target; even lower than the 47% achieved in 2018." Reed Employment

"Half of maths and physics teachers quit within five years" Guardian excerpt.

"The NFER's Teacher Labour Market in England Annual Report 2020, based on data collected prior to the Covid-19 pandemic, shows that the recruitment situation has "significantly worsened" for shortage subjects at secondary level, such as physics, maths, modern foreign languages (MFL) and chemistry." Tes website.
Precisely. A job to avoid! Crap wages. crap workinh conditions, high stress!
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mgi
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(Original post by Kk1999)
The same has happened with me and I had to work hard all on my own to clear the exams.
there should be some monitoring or something by the board.
that's the school leadership team's job! But there are major teacher shortages because the job ain't good tbh!
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Kk1999
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(Original post by mgi)
No, you should read some of the previous posts. It is not always about "standards". There is a chronuc shortage of subject qualified chemistry, maths and physics teachers! Graduates in those subjects go elsewhere!
Teaching is actually a crap job in the UK!
You could complain but a school cannot give you what they haven't got!
sorry... I missed the earlier ones...
I actually don't want this to happen with others cuz I had to face a lot of hardships during my time...

Maybe the graduates demand a good salary!
That's happened in my place, They left because of the salary....
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Kk1999
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(Original post by mgi)
no , that would be the school headteacher and Ofsted! lots of well qualified graduates don't want to be teachers. I can't think why?lol
They too have some demands 😞
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Kk1999
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(Original post by mgi)
that's the school leadership team's job! But there are major teacher shortages because the job ain't good tbh!
Those teams are just playing with our lives... and potentials... ngl I sued my school after graduating.
Inwas branded a hypocrite for doing that but I feel I did the right thing by saving other students time and efforts.
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Kk1999
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(Original post by mgi)
Precisely. A job to avoid! Crap wages. crap workinh conditions, high stress!
If avoided then the other generations to come 😭
I am a teacher but I don't teach Physics... I wish I could
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mgi
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(Original post by blackugo)
My physics teacher doesn't know even the basics of differentiation or integration.
She was completely unaware of most overlaps between the maths syllabus and physics with topics such as simple harmonic motion, circular motion etc despite teaching A-Level physics for a number of years. She was hopeless with logarithms when doing nuclear decay. And she definitely had no clue how to derive any shm equations and nuclear decay equations because she seemingly no maths skill. She supposedly has a physics degree but I heard physics degrees are maths heavy. She has also said that a degree is easier than A-Level. The physics surely gets much harder at University. It did always seem like she memorised things and never had a mathematical understanding of how things worked. She would say she derived equations from the "definitions" by remembering the sentences rather than how to manipulate the equation.

This has really made me question what qualifications she really has. On top of these, she often makes mistakes like saying there are uniform gravitational waves between 2 books. Yes, 2 books. She also once taught that the outer layer of stars was made out of iron and the innermost was hydrogen until she was corrected by someone *cough* *cough*. She also didn't understand that a falling object could have negative acceleration.

What do you think? Is it a common occurrence for A-Level Physics teachers to be unaware of basic A-level maths concepts. Is this teacher a fraud?
Obviously she is not a physics or maths graduate! Your school probably couldn't find one but they had to find a teacher for the class. What students should be doing is actually realising that teachers need more respect and support from society. That's what students should also be complaining about! But most are oblivious as to the reasons why so many science graduates don't want to be teachers in the UK, hence the massive shortages. PE teachers are now teaching year 7 science classes! Unbelievable! The kids never do the required practicals when this happens!
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Kk1999)
Those teams are just playing with our lives... and potentials... ngl I sued my school after graduating.
Inwas branded a hypocrite for doing that but I feel I did the right thing by saving other students time and efforts.
How does causing the school to lose a large amount of money in unnecessary legal action help recruit specialist teachers which don't exist?

You haven't 'saved other students time and efforts', and you didn't 'do the right thing'. Petulant litigation just costs money which schools don't have, time which schools don't have and results in literally zero actual change, and for what purpose? Some desire for retribution?
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