taking art for gcse pepole say its a mistake

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itzkaceyxx
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what do you think
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rxyaltyx
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i didn't take it because everyone told me not to
it's a very hard gcse
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itzkaceyxx
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(Original post by rxyaltyx)
i didn't take it because everyone told me not to
it's a very hard gcse
ok thanks
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squeakysquirrel
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(Original post by itzkaceyxx)
what do you think
Having seen people who've taken art - it is a lot of work, but if you are good at it and you have a sensible range of other subjects - why not

I did art - many years ago - despite having never really been any good at drawing -( perfected abstract art which nobody understood! I was awful) and somehow I got a C. But is was a fluke and a lot of hard graft
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Moonbow
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Hi there!
I just finished GCSE art this year and loved it! Please bare in mind though it is a lot of work. People assume it’s an easy GCSE but then realise too late how much work and care you have to put into it. From my experience, you do not get taught how to actually draw, but my school might be a loose cannon on that.
It definitely has to be an area where you have a great passion to really enjoy it. Bear in mind, for art boards I put in at least a day and a bit on the weekend to get it where I wanted it to be, so you need to really think if you are willing to commit lots of time into it.
Grading can be quite hard depending on your exam board, as all your boards (which are pieces usually the size of A2 for AQA at least, some people did A3) have to show progression through a chosen theme that will build up the the final piece. I remember we had to do:
Introduction board (mood board on chosen theme etc.)
Artist study 1
Artist study 2
Idea 1
Idea 2
Optional: Idea 3
Photoshoot
Photo analysis (drawing your photos)
Composition
Media
Final piece
This is just for my school, yours may vary but will roughly be the same. Remember how long I said one board could take me, you need to do a LOT of them. Usually they are several drawings per board or a massive one (which I’ve found is more impactful) and two smaller ones alongside annotations. This is just the coursework. For the actual exam we started around January in year 11 and we had to do this again and go twice as fast, from a board a fortnight to a board a week.
Every school is different (we did all our coursework in year 11 and used year 10 to do practice boards to prepare) so it’s hard to predict what your actual structure will be like, but I’m sure you can see now why if you go in half hearted, you really struggle. Art is a great GCSE but requires motivation, resilience and a passion for what you do. It is such a character building process and in my opinion is one of the best GCSE subjects you can do because of this.
I hope this answers your question! Please feel free to throw any more my way and I’ll happily answer it as best I can
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rxyaltyx
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(Original post by itzkaceyxx)
ok thanks
npp
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natalie_123
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Personally art gcse was absolutely awful for me, so much work and I didn’t really enjoy any of it. You don’t actually get taught how to draw/paint etc and there’s not much room to make the kind of art you actually enjoy. If you really love art then go for it, but be aware the workload can be really overwhelming especially if you don’t keep on top of it throughout the year
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Raven Firefly
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I got a 3 for Art GCSE I worked the hardest for it out of all of my subject and spent the most time. But I think you have to have a bit of natural talent, it will probably come easily to you. Just be aware that it is not a easy GCSE like I was led to believe when I chose it.
My experience may be different from yours because I had lots of Art teachers because they seemed to keep leaving for some reason. My experience could be very different from yours
Last edited by Raven Firefly; 3 weeks ago
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xavana.studies
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I'm sure that the Art GCSE itself is a very good course, yet from what I've experienced (getting results next month!) I'd say the main problem with Art is how the teachers approach it. Only two people passed the mocks out of approx. 38 students in my year, so please be aware of how tedious the workload is!

Tips:
-Watch the online A* tutorials for GCSE Art (even if your teachers say no) and 're-invent' their ideas
-Do NOT, under any circumstances, throw away the art that you aren't happy with. You can get very high marks for your artistic progression!
-Don't overcomplicate things. My biggest mistake was trying to analyse my work as if it was a 3,000-word essay - it's not. You can easily analyse to A* standard in less than half of an A4 page

Art was a very stressful course for me, but the day that I realised my mistake in choosing it was when my teacher told me that I "can't think like an artist to pass the course". The GCSE is very repetitive and methodical, but if you are a willing artist and love the subject then I recommend it for you. Although it's unlikely that I'll get a 'good' grade, it was a lot of fun and I actually found myself as an artist in that class.

I wish you the best of luck, and if you're prepared to work really hard and genuinely enjoy the subject; do it.
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itzkaceyxx
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(Original post by Moonbow)
Hi there!
I just finished GCSE art this year and loved it! Please bare in mind though it is a lot of work. People assume it’s an easy GCSE but then realise too late how much work and care you have to put into it. From my experience, you do not get taught how to actually draw, but my school might be a loose cannon on that.
It definitely has to be an area where you have a great passion to really enjoy it. Bear in mind, for art boards I put in at least a day and a bit on the weekend to get it where I wanted it to be, so you need to really think if you are willing to commit lots of time into it.
Grading can be quite hard depending on your exam board, as all your boards (which are pieces usually the size of A2 for AQA at least, some people did A3) have to show progression through a chosen theme that will build up the the final piece. I remember we had to do:
Introduction board (mood board on chosen theme etc.)
Artist study 1
Artist study 2
Idea 1
Idea 2
Optional: Idea 3
Photoshoot
Photo analysis (drawing your photos)
Composition
Media
Final piece
This is just for my school, yours may vary but will roughly be the same. Remember how long I said one board could take me, you need to do a LOT of them. Usually they are several drawings per board or a massive one (which I’ve found is more impactful) and two smaller ones alongside annotations. This is just the coursework. For the actual exam we started around January in year 11 and we had to do this again and go twice as fast, from a board a fortnight to a board a week.
Every school is different (we did all our coursework in year 11 and used year 10 to do practice boards to prepare) so it’s hard to predict what your actual structure will be like, but I’m sure you can see now why if you go in half hearted, you really struggle. Art is a great GCSE but requires motivation, resilience and a passion for what you do. It is such a character building process and in my opinion is one of the best GCSE subjects you can do because of this.
I hope this answers your question! Please feel free to throw any more my way and I’ll happily answer it as best I can
thanks this rlly helped
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Moonbow
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(Original post by itzkaceyxx)
thanks this rlly helped
Your welcome! Anytime
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ReadingMum
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My daughter took Art GCSE 2 years ago - we did warn her against it but there you go. It was a lot of work compared to other subjects. At the start the teacher said that the exam would be before Easter so that it would be out of the way by the full on revision period running up to the real exams. That teacher left at the end of yr 12. In the end she handed in the final piece of coursework the day before the start of study leave (less than a couple of weeks before her first exam). So stressful.
For her GCSEs she got 8 9s, an 8, a 7 and a 6. The 6 was Art and she had put a LOT of effort into it.
If you love the subject and don't mind the workload then choose it - but go in with your eyes wide open.
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yasmin03
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I took it and got a 9... however it was the most work out of all my subjects and I probably did more work at home than at school. If you would enjoy it and are willing to put the work in, I would say do it. I really enjoyed it, but I was probably the only person in my class who managed to keep up to where I was supposed to be.

If you are not willing to put the effort in- DO NOT TAKE IT. there were so many girls who thought it would be an “easy pass”, and also lots of talented artists who deserved higher grades, but didn’t link their art strongly enough to the artists that they had researched. I hope this helps, and if you have any questions, let me know
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Kool Kats
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I ended up doing art by accident because there weren’t enough people to do textiles - best decision of my life!! I‘ve just finished art in year 11 (submitted my unfinished coursework before lockdown) and it was my favourite subject. If you’re doing mostly academic subjects then art is a nice break in the day- we had lots of work so it wasn’t less busy than other classes but we were able to run our own schedules on what we were doing which was great. I did the majority of work at home so I used my hour of art mostly as a chance for a nap, we played music and talked, even when I was doing the work it was a really relaxing class.

Bear in mind that art is not an ‘easy’ subject, all your work has to link to artists and inspiration, and you have to analyse and evaluate work. We did learn lots of new things like printing, painting accurately, and realistic drawing which helped me a lot as painting wasn’t my strong point. You try out lots of things for the first year then in the second project and coursework you get more of a chance to express yourself and do what you want. For example for my coursework this year I focused on miniatures as that’s my strong point. I didn’t have to put any of my weak painting in

Basically it is generally enjoyable but only if you take it seriously and set aside time in the week to do art, as it will take up a lot of time, but I found that it was worth it I’m going on to study art full time in college because art really brought out the best in me and I can’t imagine studying anything else. Most people in my class hated it but that was because they didn’t really try to do the work and were more focused on doing their calligraphy as titles tbh

Good luck OP
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PetitePanda
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Take it if you want to but do bear in mind the workload is quite heavy. Tbh I did DT, Art and History as my options and I found the workload fine as long as you did your work in class as it's easy to gossip in Art. If you like art, go for it. Tbh I didn't regret it even when I didnt take it for A levels
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OddOnes
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It's really hard to get a high grade in. You have to be naturally gifted to get an A or A*. I got a C yet I can draw and paint. It's very disheartening to be given mediocre grades for your work. It puts a lot of people off art afterwards.
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IQuitTSR
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(Original post by natalie_123)
Personally art gcse was absolutely awful for me, so much work and I didn’t really enjoy any of it. You don’t actually get taught how to draw/paint etc and there’s not much room to make the kind of art you actually enjoy. If you really love art then go for it, but be aware the workload can be really overwhelming especially if you don’t keep on top of it throughout the year
Man I thought they'd teach how to draw. No wonder I wasn't accepted in the class and chose another subject instead!
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f15es1
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Art was a very hard subject. I used to get bursts of motivation and then the next minute I'd hate it. Overall I found it enjoyable and am now taking art a level however I think part of the process is coming to terms that you're not going to like it all the time as that is practically impossible. The workload was very high and sometimes I did skip pieces but top tip is if you tried hard in art tin the lower years and have pieces you don't think are too bad just cut them out off old books and stick them in your sketchbook for weeks when it's a struggle.
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EDEM0978
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I did Art GCSE (getting results this year, although was predicted an A* back in February) and I absolutely loved it (CCEA board, but mostly a similar experience). I was doing the three sciences and Further Maths with it, and it was genuinely the only thing that got me through those subjects. I'm taking both Art and History of Art A-Level, which shows just how much I fell in love with the subject at GCSE level.

Heads up though:
- It is NOT a 'we'll teach you how to draw class'. You're expected to know how to draw. It's slightly unfair in that sense, but there's really not much that can be done about it.
- You don't have to be extremely 'good' at art though. Most of the focus is on improvement throughout the course. Is the stuff I did at the start of the GCSE as good as my stuff at the end? Of course not. I got better, because I was drawing more. You might see the final projects and get scared off doing the GSCE, but it's really, really important to remember that those people have improved massively since they started, and if you decide to do it, inevitably you will too.
- You will need to do work at home, but you don't necessarily need to spend dozens of hours doing detailed drawings. I used to make prints by dipping cardboard shapes into acrylic paint. I cut up some photographs and free Tesco magazines to make collages. I did big titles, and filled empty space on pages with tons of notes about how I could improve that took me about ten minutes.
- If you sit in class and do nothing, yes, you won't get things done. There were tons of people who just saw it as an easy class. But if you place the same value on it as you do on your other subjects, and work for most of the class, you'll be fine.
- If you're not motivated, I'd think twice. It does take quite a bit of motivation to do things at home especially.
- The people (in my experience) who complain about art limiting them were the people that I knew who liked or got into drawing through manga/anime/cartoon characters. It's not really done at GCSE. If you're willing to try new subject matters and topics, yes, of course do it, and if you like drawing flowers or leaves or people - it probably won't limit you much. I did 'Urban' as one of my topics, which was like cities and buildings, and 'Food' as another, for example.

Overall, I would recommend it. I loved it. People said with three sciences and FM it would be too much, and it really wasn't. It's time consuming if you're not efficient and spend a lot of time questioning what to do, but if you don't, it's a more than manageable workload.
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CoolCavy
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(Original post by OddOnes)
It's really hard to get a high grade in. You have to be naturally gifted to get an A or A*. I got a C yet I can draw and paint. It's very disheartening to be given mediocre grades for your work. It puts a lot of people off art afterwards.
I don't think this is actually true, very talented people can get a low grade for a number of reasons.
GCSE (many GCSEs in general tbh) art is a hoop jumping exercise. You need to explain why you have done things, what worked, what didnt, what artists inspired you, experiment with a range of media and materials, keep things in your sketchbook even if they went wrong etc.
Examiners are interested in the process, less so the final result. I've known very talented people recieve a lower grade because they were very insistent about only drawing in one style and with one material. They produced some stunning work but it was not the work the examiners wanted to see. It's the journey, less so the destination.


OP if you want to do it then go for it, the workload is high but I feel it is often overstated by those who took art to have an 'easy' option and then were shocked by how much effort you needed to put in.
I did GCSE and Alevel art and loved it, yes some aspects can be frustrating and you do need to tick a lot of boxes but it was a nice relief from the sit down at a desk and write classroom environment and experimenting with different things really does help you improve your art long term.
You dont get taught as such to draw but a good teacher will guide you about light, shadows, texture etc.
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