The-judge-16
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I’m really unsure whether to do a degree in psychology as I’ve heard that finding a job upon graduation after a Bsc is pretty much impossible, and also the salary is not too great? Also could I transfer into msc or phd in neuroscience after doing a Bsc in psychology, or would I need to do neuroscience/biology Bsc?

What are your thoughts?

Any help would be much appreciated.

Many thanks
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xoxAngel_Kxox
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I did a psychology degree and loved it. Wouldn't change it for the world, BUT I'm not using it in my career now, at all. I loved the course, the tutors, the friends I met .. but ultimately my life would be the same career wise (in fact I'd be three years further into it!) if I hadn't done it at all.

If you have a specific job in mind, make sure you're aware of the exact path you'll need to take to get there. Most students are surprised when they graduate and realise that there are still almost zero psychology related jobs available to them without further training. That said, the degree opens lots of doors to graduate schemes. But it depends exactly what you want.

Do plenty of research to help you weigh up your options .
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artful_lounger
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Career prospects outside of specific roles (mainly clinical psychology roles, which require a great deal of graduate training anyway) which require a psychology degree will be the same as for any other degree.

In terms of going on to a PhD in neuroscience, it would probably depend on the content and style of your course. For very scientific courses e.g. at Oxford, Cambridge (which actually has options from the natural sciences psychology and neuroscience papers available) or UCL, probably easier than from other courses that are less focused on the scientific/experimental aspects of psychology. There are still probably some areas you may be less suited to going into (e.g. anything really focused on the biomolecular principles of neuroscience) with a psychology degree.

Noodlzzz may be able to advise on graduate prospects of psychology degrees as well as on PhD possibilities?
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bones-mccoy
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As Angel has already said, becoming a psychologist requires at least an MSc or doctoral level qualification so be aware of that.

The best thing to do would be to look at the entry requirements for masters and doctorates in neuroscience and see what they ask for. I did a little bit of Googling and the ones I found tended to ask for an undergrad degree in a biological discipline such as biology or biochemistry, neuroscience itself and sometimes even psychology or medicine.
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iammichealjackson
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(Original post by The-judge-16)
I’m really unsure whether to do a degree in psychology as I’ve heard that finding a job upon graduation after a Bsc is pretty much impossible, and also the salary is not too great? Also could I transfer into msc or phd in neuroscience after doing a Bsc in psychology, or would I need to do neuroscience/biology Bsc?

What are your thoughts?

Any help would be much appreciated.

Many thanks
I'd say neuroscience and psychology have similar grad prospects.

There are relatively limited "psychology" jobs outside of teaching, research, or applied (clinical/educational/etc) though there are a few jobs like marketing or HR where knowledge of psychology is useful (they are a bit less luctrative).

That being said, just having ANY degree will open up a load of graduate jobs (e.g. consulting) which have decent pay, but you have to get relevant work experience during your degree and show initiative.

If your interested in both neuroscience and psychology, there are a few degrees which do quite well at incorporating both (and you can take modules from both). Not just in oxbridge but you can do this elsewhere (joint honours degrees might be worth looking at). You can do a PhD in neuroscience from psychology, but you'd have to pick your topic carefully. As the above poster says, you'd be undeprepared for some aspects of the course like doing lab work or working on cells. However some aspects of "neuroscience" like MRI/MEG/EEG scanning on humans is often covered in psych degrees too (e.g. Cognitive Neuroscience).
Last edited by iammichealjackson; 1 year ago
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iammichealjackson
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(Original post by The-judge-16)
I’m really unsure whether to do a degree in psychology as I’ve heard that finding a job upon graduation after a Bsc is pretty much impossible, and also the salary is not too great? Also could I transfer into msc or phd in neuroscience after doing a Bsc in psychology, or would I need to do neuroscience/biology Bsc?

What are your thoughts?

Any help would be much appreciated.

Many thanks
Also just to add: its not impossible for sure. However, you can't just get a 2:1 and do no work experience and expect to have a competitive CV after. This is true for a lot of things, except maybe if you do a degree that's very in demand.
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