Sungkyunkwan university recognized in the uk?

Watch
Awatif.Mx
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#1
I want to study at Sungkyunkwan University in South Korea next year doing chemical engineering. Will my degree be recognised in the UK since they have partnerships with universities like ucl, Middlesex, kings , queens , imperial? *many more partnerships in the UK but I’m focusing on London*
0
reply
Compost
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 weeks ago
#2
Their chemical engineering degrees are not accredited by the Institution of Chemical Engineers and so do not automatically meet the academic requirements to become a chartered engineer. However, but South Korea is a signatory to the Washington Accord https://www.ieagreements.org/accords...n/signatories/ which means that it is likely your degree will give you significant exemptions - you would then only need to provide evidence of gaining the 'missing bits' - if you do apply to get chartered.

(It would probably get you exemption at B-standard at least, which means that you would be fully compliant if you then did an accredited MSc in the UK.)
Last edited by Compost; 2 weeks ago
0
reply
Awatif.Mx
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#3
(Original post by Compost)
Their chemical engineering degrees are not accredited by the Institution of Chemical Engineers and so do not automatically meet the academic requirements to become a chartered engineer. However, but South Korea is a signatory to the Washington Accord https://www.ieagreements.org/accords...n/signatories/ which means that it is likely your degree will give you significant exemptions - you would then only need to provide evidence of gaining the 'missing bits' - if you do apply to get chartered.

(It would probably get you exemption at B-standard at least, which means that you would be fully compliant if you then did an accredited MSc in the UK.)
What do you mean by “provide evidence of gaining the 'missing bits'“. What missing bits do you mean and if I want to apply to get chartered would I apply for that in the South Korea or would I do it in the UK and how would I apply for this ?
0
reply
Compost
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 weeks ago
#4
(Original post by Awatif.Mx)
What do you mean by “provide evidence of gaining the 'missing bits'“. What missing bits do you mean and if I want to apply to get chartered would I apply for that in the South Korea or would I do it in the UK and how would I apply for this ?
If you decide to get chartered as a chemical engineer in the UK then you have to:

  1. have completed degree(s) that have been accredited by IChemE or satisfy IChemE that you have gained the knowledge and understanding required.
  2. Have completed your initial professional development, e.g. by completing an approved company training scheme
  3. Satisfy IChemE that you have the professional knowledge and understanding to be chartered (you submit a report and are interviewed on it)

IChemE accredits degrees at universities in quite a few countries (15-20) but there is an international agreement called the Washington Accord where countries, to an extent, accept each others accreditations. Both the UK and South Korea are signatories and so a Korean chemical engineering degree would probably be accepted as equivalent to a UK BEng, but you would have to provide evidence that you had gained the knowledge of the masters content through study or work. (They'd need transcripts of what you'd studied to decide exactly what - if anything - was missing). Hundreds of people do this every year as they want to be IChemE chartered chemical engineers (even if they don't work in the UK) but their degrees were not fully accredited by IChemE.

You could stay in Korea and apply to become a chartered engineer (the application is online and many interviews are virtual) but the South Korean equivalent to UK chartership https://www.kpea.or.kr/kpea/english/overivew.html might prove more suitable - or you can do both.
Last edited by Compost; 2 weeks ago
1
reply
Awatif.Mx
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#5
(Original post by Compost)
If you decide to get chartered as a chemical engineer in the UK then you have to:

  1. have completed degree(s) that have been accredited by IChemE or satisfy IChemE that you have gained the knowledge and understanding required.
  2. Have completed your initial professional development, e.g. by completing an approved company training scheme
  3. Satisfy IChemE that you have the professional knowledge and understanding to be chartered (you submit a report and are interviewed on it)

IChemE accredits degrees at universities in quite a few countries (15-20) but there is an international agreement called the Washington Accord where countries, to an extent, accept each others accreditations. Both the UK and South Korea are signatories and so a Korean chemical engineering degree would probably be accepted as equivalent to a UK BEng, but you would have to provide evidence that you had gained the knowledge of the masters content through study or work. (They'd need transcripts of what you'd studied to decide exactly what - if anything - was missing). Hundreds of people do this every year as they want to be IChemE chartered chemical engineers (even if they don't work in the UK) but their degrees were not fully accredited by IChemE.

You could stay in Korea and apply to become a chartered engineer (the application is online and many interviews are virtual) but the South Korean equivalent to UK chartership https://www.kpea.or.kr/kpea/english/overivew.html might prove more suitable - or you can do both.
Ohh I understand it better now thank you so much I have one last question if you don’t mind.
If I do chemical engineering in South Korea then come back an apply for a masters in their partnered universities eg Middlesex university would they accept me and would I still have to apply to be IChemE chartered chemical engineer then?
0
reply
Compost
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 week ago
#6
(Original post by Awatif.Mx)
If I do chemical engineering in South Korea then come back an apply for a masters in their partnered universities eg Middlesex university would they accept me and would I still have to apply to be IChemE chartered chemical engineer then?
Potentially you could apply for a Masters at any UK university that offers one (although Middlesex does not have any accredited chemical engineering programmes). Given the right professional development after that (e.g. completing an accredited company training scheme) you could apply to become an IChemE chartered chemical engineer but it is also possible to get chartered having done all your degrees abroad - the process just takes rather more evidence.
0
reply
Awatif.Mx
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#7
(Original post by Compost)
Potentially you could apply for a Masters at any UK university that offers one (although Middlesex does not have any accredited chemical engineering programmes). Given the right professional development after that (e.g. completing an accredited company training scheme) you could apply to become an IChemE chartered chemical engineer but it is also possible to get chartered having done all your degrees abroad - the process just takes rather more evidence.
Do you by any chance know a university in London that has accredited chemical engineering programmes
0
reply
Compost
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 week ago
#8
(Original post by Awatif.Mx)
Do you by any chance know a university in London that has accredited chemical engineering programmes
Each programme has to be accredited separately, so not all a university's chem eng programmes may be but the following definitely have accredited programmes:
  • Imperial
  • London South Bank
  • UCL (both for chem eng and biochem eng)
and the following might do, or should do soon:
  • Brunel
  • Greenwich
  • London, Queen Mary's

(Accreditations come in 3 main types:
  1. B-standard. In the UK this would be a 3-year BEng
  2. M-standard. In the UK this would be a 4-year MEng
  3. F-standard. In the UK this would be a one year MSc
To fulfill the educational requirements for chartered you need an M-standard or a B plus an F standard. (If you don't have one of these then it is still possible to get chartered but you have to go through a more detailed assessment of what you have got to prove you know enough).

https://www.icheme.org/education/fin...ree-programme/
Last edited by Compost; 1 week ago
0
reply
Awatif.Mx
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#9
(Original post by Compost)
Each programme has to be accredited separately, so not all a university's chem eng programmes may be but the following definitely have accredited programmes:
  • Imperial
  • London South Bank
  • UCL (both for chem eng and biochem eng)
and the following might do, or should do soon:
  • Brunel
  • Greenwich
  • London, Queen Mary's

(Accreditations come in 3 main types:
  1. B-standard. In the UK this would be a 3-year BEng
  2. M-standard. In the UK this would be a 4-year MEng
  3. F-standard. In the UK this would be a one year MSc
To fulfill the educational requirements for chartered you need an M-standard or a B plus an F standard. (If you don't have one of these then it is still possible to get chartered but you have to go through a more detailed assessment of what you have got to prove you know enough).

https://www.icheme.org/education/fin...ree-programme/
Okayyy I fully understand everything now thank you so much for your time and help☺️☺️
0
reply
Awatif.Mx
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#10
(Original post by Awatif.Mx)
Okayyy I fully understand everything now thank you so much for your time and help☺️☺️
Do you by any chance know the acceptance rate for international students at Sungkyunkwan university?
Also
Do you know if there is any other universities in Seoul South Korea that teach chemical engineering in English?
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Did you get the SQA results you wanted today?

Yes- I did even better than I hoped! (34)
17.8%
Yes- I got what I was hoping for (53)
27.75%
No- my results weren't as good as I'd hoped (104)
54.45%

Watched Threads

View All