UK Policeman Suspended After Kneeling on Kneck of Black Man

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Roidrage69
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#41
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#41
There is not one person in the country who could disarm a man with a knife and not be a serious risk of being stabbed himself, police should do a lot more training in restraints and martial arts but it only goes so far.

If they are suspected of having a weapon, being restrained fast should be the first thing that should happen before they get a chance to use it or run and use on the public. I've tried de-escalating situations who people very drunk and coked up, their mothers wouldn't be able to calm them down never mind a stranger.
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JOSH4598
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(Original post by Wired_1800)
I don't agree with you. I have written that police officers should learn how to disarm an individual or de-escalate the situation.

Yes, routine killing has not been part of British policing culture because we have been fortunate to not have armed police officers and have community policing in some areas. I disagree that officers should be allowed to use violence to resolve a situation.
I would be amused to see how you deal with these situations in real life. I can assure you'd be on your toes running off as opposed to 'talking with' a knife-wielding maniac. There's a stark difference between 'force' and 'violence'. Officers do no exhibit violence, at least not without obvious misconduct. They do however use force to prevent that individual posing a risk to other members of the public.

You state officers should "learn how to disarm an individual" - presumably disarm them with words?!? Politely engaging in conversation has no place when dealing with a violent individual. The figures speak for themselves. Killings by police are remarkably low and are largely concentrated amongst terrorists! You rather swiftly by-passed my question regarding that.

You evidently live in a fantasy world where violent criminals are downplayed as alleged victims. I would argue these individuals (who plague our country with violence and brutal murders) deserve the full force of the law if they are bringing weapons onto our streets. I would rather force be used by officers as opposed to officers being injured. Think about it from the police's viewpoint and maybe you will have more understanding.
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imlikeahermit
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#43
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Love all the armchair policemen in this thread who have absolutely no clue what kind of scumbags the police deal with on a regular basis. What’s happened here is wrong, but that doesn’t mean that the police should suddenly take a hands off approach. You have absolutely no idea who they deal with.
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Wired_1800
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#44
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(Original post by JOSH4598)
I would be amused to see how you deal with these situations in real life. I can assure you'd be on your toes running off as opposed to 'talking with' a knife-wielding maniac. There's a stark difference between 'force' and 'violence'. Officers do no exhibit violence, at least not without obvious misconduct. They do however use force to prevent that individual posing a risk to other members of the public.

You state officers should "learn how to disarm an individual" - presumably disarm them with words?!? Politely engaging in conversation has no place when dealing with a violent individual. The figures speak for themselves. Killings by police are remarkably low and are largely concentrated amongst terrorists! You rather swiftly by-passed my question regarding that.

You evidently live in a fantasy world where violent criminals are downplayed as alleged victims. I would argue these individuals (who plague our country with violence and brutal murders) deserve the full force of the law if they are bringing weapons onto our streets. I would rather force be used by officers as opposed to officers being injured. Think about it from the police's viewpoint and maybe you will have more understanding.
I am not trained to be in such situations. If an individual uses the same tactics that an officer uses and it is called violence then it is violence.
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imlikeahermit
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#45
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(Original post by Wired_1800)
I am not trained to be in such situations. If an individual uses the same tactics that an officer uses and it is called violence then it is violence.
I would imagine, that is you are not trained to be in such situations, you also haven’t been in those situations, therefore your airy fairy opinion of how crime actually is, is complete ********.
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Wired_1800
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(Original post by imlikeahermit)
I would imagine, that is you are not trained to be in such situations, you also haven’t been in those situations, therefore your airy fairy opinion of how crime actually is, is complete ********.
Ok. No problem.
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prodigy999
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Male extremely violent (as above)

Male was wanted on a recall to prison (aka being sent back to prison as he had breached his conditions of release)

Male had a knife

Male violently resisted officers
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Gundabad(good)
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#48
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(Original post by Napp)
Seeing as you're conflating this with racism, might one ask you show me where restraining a criminal (in an admittedly dubious manner) has anything to do with it?



They may well do but from this article they dont seem to have done anything overly bad, bar having the situational awareness of roadkill.
Imagine if the guy died though! There would be protests for weeks!
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mgi
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#49
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(Original post by Roidrage69)
There is not one person in the country who could disarm a man with a knife and not be a serious risk of being stabbed himself, police should do a lot more training in restraints and martial arts but it only goes so far.

If they are suspected of having a weapon, being restrained fast should be the first thing that should happen before they get a chance to use it or run and use on the public. I've tried de-escalating situations who people very drunk and coked up, their mothers wouldn't be able to calm them down never mind a stranger.
So kneeling on the neck or head after handcuffing a suspect is understandable then, right? OMG.
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Napp
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(Original post by Gundabad(good))
Imagine if the guy died though! There would be protests for weeks!
Indeed, chances of him dying from a couple of seconds of pressure though? Not overly high.
Then again, considering he's a knife wielding criminal perhaps the sympathy would be, rightly, less forthcoming?
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Napp
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(Original post by nathan_nacu)
There is not a single mention of racism here except in your own posts sir
I didnt say in this thread...?
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Occitanie
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#52
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(Original post by Underscore__)
This was clearly not a good idea given recent events but to compare this to what happened to George Floyd is embarrassing and shows an obvious a ‘anti-police’ agenda.

This man was in possession of a deadly weapon, George Floyd wasn’t. This man appeared to be resisting arrest, George Floyd wasn’t. Derek Chauvin was pinning all of his wait, through his knee, on to George Floyd’s neck, this police officer wasn’t. I could go on listing differences but I’m sure any objective person can already understand.
Oh ****... he had a deadly weapon? /s

Yeah, you simply can't compare this event with what happened to George Floyd.

I understand that a police officer kneeling on a suspect's neck in today's climate and in general isn't great, but context mattered with George Floyd and context matters in this situation.
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mgi
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(Original post by prodigy999)
Name:  FB_IMG_1595101587018.jpg
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Size:  73.6 KBName:  FB_IMG_1595101583290.jpg
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Male extremely violent (as above)

Male was wanted on a recall to prison (aka being sent back to prison as he had breached his conditions of release)

Male had a knife

Male violently resisted officers
This proves what?
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mgi
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(Original post by imlikeahermit)
Love all the armchair policemen in this thread who have absolutely no clue what kind of scumbags the police deal with on a regular basis. What’s happened here is wrong, but that doesn’t mean that the police should suddenly take a hands off approach. You have absolutely no idea who they deal with.
You have no idea about the experiences of people who post on these threads though. Some posters may have had some very valid experiences of working with or dealing with police officers. How would you know?
And no one said that the police should take a "hands off approach"! Those are your words and don't appear anywhere else.
And law breakers are not animals; they still have some rights! I am sure you are not trying to tell us that kneeling on the head or neck of a suspect is an acceptable restraint method?-'---or are you??
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mgi
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(Original post by Occitanie)
Oh ****... he had a deadly weapon? /s

Yeah, you simply can't compare this event with what happened to George Floyd.

I understand that a police officer kneeling on a suspect's neck in today's climate and in general isn't great, but context mattered with George Floyd and context matters in this situation.
Who cares about the comparison though? using the knee on the neck or head is not an accepted method by the Met Police itself for restraint of a suspect.
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MiddleFinger
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#56
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Blurry video kinda hard to see what exactly happened didn't look like his knee was down hard against his neck like Floyd but still not acceptable
Last edited by MiddleFinger; 2 weeks ago
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The RAR
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(Original post by nathan_nacu)
I mean “the UK is innocent though” 🤨 “Could never happen here”.


https://www.aa.com.tr/en/europe/uk-p...s-neck/1914301

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I would be more interested to know what happened BEFORE the officer used such a tactic. Otherwise I will assume the police are in the right
Last edited by The RAR; 2 weeks ago
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nathan_nacu
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(Original post by Underscore__)
So you skipped the part where I said this wasn’t a good idea? I didn’t say what they did was right, I said it’s not even in the same universe as what happened to George Floyd, this was far more defendable
They are both equally defendable because using neck chokes are *wrong* no matter what.
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nathan_nacu
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#59
(Original post by The RAR)
I would be more interested to know what happened BEFORE the officer used such a tactic. Otherwise I will assume the police are in the right

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nathan_nacu
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#60
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(Original post by Napp)
I didnt say in this thread...?
Your very first post stated that I’m “conflating this with racism” but yet where was race or racism used ?
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