pya123
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Hi everyone, does anyone have any advice on what studying neuroscience at university is like and where it may lead to?
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Mojmeer
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I assume that you mean Neuroscience as a Biology degree and that on its own does not lead anywhere.
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pya123
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(Original post by Mojmeer)
I assume that you mean Neuroscience as a Biology degree and that on its own does not lead anywhere.
Oh, thank you.
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Dechante
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(Original post by pya123)
Hi everyone, does anyone have any advice on what studying neuroscience at university is like and where it may lead to?
Hey I also plan on doing a neuroscience degree and had the same worries so maybe I can help you out.

Your job prospects definitely will not be limited by doing a neuroscience degree. I would argue that modules within neuroscience are actually broader than in general biology. But, it does depend on the exact course at the specific university. The only thing is compared to a bio degree you wouldn't learn stuff like ecology. In neuroscience, you study quite wide range of modules from general human biology modules to a bit of chemistry and physics, to more psychology and brain related modules. As you go through the degree you have more choice over the module content you select, and you can specialise in wide range of areas, such as genetics, more psychology-related neuroscience, or biochemistry-related content. I would say because of how new and broad neuroscience is, there is no limitation in terms of jobs because a neuroscientist has the opportunity to go into a biological route, a psychological route or a strictly neuro route. You could go into research, regulatory affairs, marketing (check out neuro-marketing), business, computer science (artificial intelligence). pharmaceuticals and I could go on. It's more the skills you learn from the degree than the name of it

Some people do further study and do PGCE to become a teacher, postgraduate medicine or denistry, NHS scientist training programme or NHS management scheme. Also, don't forget many employers accept any degrees like Civil service so don't stop your options there.

Here's some links:
https://www.bna.org.uk/careers/
https://work.chron.com/list-careers-...nce-11583.html

I would recommend speaking to some students on UCAS unibuddy to ask them questions about the course
https://ucas.unibuddy.co/buddies?sub...faaa0010193548
Just go onto the subject column and then subjects allied to medicine and then other subjects allied to medicine and you'll see several neuroscientists
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Mojmeer
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(Original post by Dechante)
Hey I also plan on doing a neuroscience degree and had the same worries so maybe I can help you out.

Your job prospects definitely will not be limited by doing a neuroscience degree. I would argue that modules within neuroscience are actually broader than in general biology. But, it does depend on the exact course at the specific university. The only thing is compared to a bio degree you wouldn't learn stuff like ecology. In neuroscience, you study quite wide range of modules from general human biology modules to a bit of chemistry and physics, to more psychology and brain related modules. As you go through the degree you have more choice over the module content you select, and you can specialise in wide range of areas, such as genetics, more psychology-related neuroscience, or biochemistry-related content. I would say because of how new and broad neuroscience is, there is no limitation in terms of jobs because a neuroscientist has the opportunity to go into a biological route, a psychological route or a strictly neuro route. You could go into research, regulatory affairs, marketing (check out neuro-marketing), business, computer science (artificial intelligence). pharmaceuticals and I could go on. It's more the skills you learn from the degree than the name of it

Some people do further study and do PGCE to become a teacher, postgraduate medicine or denistry, NHS scientist training programme or NHS management scheme. Also, don't forget many employers accept any degrees like Civil service so don't stop your options there.

Here's some links:
https://www.bna.org.uk/careers/
https://work.chron.com/list-careers-...nce-11583.html

I would recommend speaking to some students on UCAS unibuddy to ask them questions about the course
https://ucas.unibuddy.co/buddies?sub...faaa0010193548
Just go onto the subject column and then subjects allied to medicine and then other subjects allied to medicine and you'll see several neuroscientists
You've just copy pasted lot of nonsense, how exactly you get into AI? Artificial intelligence is all about statistics, nothing to do with biology at all. There are few fringe domains like the HTM/Numenta or Human Brain Projects you are expected to have Ph.D with considerable quantitative skills.
Same with Computer Science, like what can you do? Send emails? You will not learn anything about business and marketing. To get into NHS STP is insanely difficult. You will be competing with people with multiple degrees and 5-10 or relevant experience for 3 to 5 places scattered all around the whole of the UK. You are more likely to make it into grad medicine at Imperial or Oxford. These are ridiculously unlikely scenarios that should not be a reason for considering Neuroscience.

Doing Neuro from the Psychology side is even worse. You won't learn anything from biology and you wont have a real Psychology degree either.

I am huge AI/Neuro nerd. I spent about 12 years by reading everything available. I did considered degree in Neuro, but it is so useless.
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pya123
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(Original post by Mojmeer)
You've just copy pasted lot of nonsense, how exactly you get into AI? Artificial intelligence is all about statistics, nothing to do with biology at all. There are few fringe domains like the HTM/Numenta or Human Brain Projects you are expected to have Ph.D with considerable quantitative skills.
Same with Computer Science, like what can you do? Send emails? You will not learn anything about business and marketing. To get into NHS STP is insanely difficult. You will be competing with people with multiple degrees and 5-10 or relevant experience for 3 to 5 places scattered all around the whole of the UK. You are more likely to make it into grad medicine at Imperial or Oxford. These are ridiculously unlikely scenarios that should not be a reason for considering Neuroscience.

Doing Neuro from the Psychology side is even worse. You won't learn anything from biology and you wont have a real Psychology degree either.

I am huge AI/Neuro nerd. I spent about 12 years by reading everything available. I did considered degree in Neuro, but it is so useless.
What degree did you end up doing?
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pya123
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(Original post by Dechante)
Hey I also plan on doing a neuroscience degree and had the same worries so maybe I can help you out.

Your job prospects definitely will not be limited by doing a neuroscience degree. I would argue that modules within neuroscience are actually broader than in general biology. But, it does depend on the exact course at the specific university. The only thing is compared to a bio degree you wouldn't learn stuff like ecology. In neuroscience, you study quite wide range of modules from general human biology modules to a bit of chemistry and physics, to more psychology and brain related modules. As you go through the degree you have more choice over the module content you select, and you can specialise in wide range of areas, such as genetics, more psychology-related neuroscience, or biochemistry-related content. I would say because of how new and broad neuroscience is, there is no limitation in terms of jobs because a neuroscientist has the opportunity to go into a biological route, a psychological route or a strictly neuro route. You could go into research, regulatory affairs, marketing (check out neuro-marketing), business, computer science (artificial intelligence). pharmaceuticals and I could go on. It's more the skills you learn from the degree than the name of it

Some people do further study and do PGCE to become a teacher, postgraduate medicine or denistry, NHS scientist training programme or NHS management scheme. Also, don't forget many employers accept any degrees like Civil service so don't stop your options there.

Here's some links:
https://www.bna.org.uk/careers/
https://work.chron.com/list-careers-...nce-11583.html

I would recommend speaking to some students on UCAS unibuddy to ask them questions about the course
https://ucas.unibuddy.co/buddies?sub...faaa0010193548
Just go onto the subject column and then subjects allied to medicine and then other subjects allied to medicine and you'll see several neuroscientists
Thank you!
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Dechante
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(Original post by Mojmeer)
You've just copy pasted lot of nonsense, how exactly you get into AI? Artificial intelligence is all about statistics, nothing to do with biology at all. There are few fringe domains like the HTM/Numenta or Human Brain Projects you are expected to have Ph.D with considerable quantitative skills.
Same with Computer Science, like what can you do? Send emails? You will not learn anything about business and marketing. To get into NHS STP is insanely difficult. You will be competing with people with multiple degrees and 5-10 or relevant experience for 3 to 5 places scattered all around the whole of the UK. You are more likely to make it into grad medicine at Imperial or Oxford. These are ridiculously unlikely scenarios that should not be a reason for considering Neuroscience.

Doing Neuro from the Psychology side is even worse. You won't learn anything from biology and you wont have a real Psychology degree either.

I am huge AI/Neuro nerd. I spent about 12 years by reading everything available. I did considered degree in Neuro, but it is so useless.
Neural artificial intelligence is now a thing which I have been told by several uni lecturers, neuroscientists and current neuroscience students. There are literally artificial intellegence modules on neuroscience courses. There's a demand for neuroscientists to apply information we know about the brain to technology. If you're such an AI and neuroscience nerd surely you would know that instead of being so rude to my response to someone saying I copied and pasted nonsense. Neuroscience is a constantly growing field which is changing so the fact you say it's useless makes no sense...

https://www.investopedia.com/terms/a...tworks-ann.asp
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Mojmeer
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(Original post by Dechante)
Neural artificial intelligence is now a thing which I have been told by several uni lecturers, neuroscientists and current neuroscience students. There are literally artificial intellegence modules on neuroscience courses. There's a demand for neuroscientists to apply information we know about the brain to technology. If you're such an AI and neuroscience nerd surely you would know that instead of being so rude to my response to someone saying I copied and pasted nonsense. Neuroscience is a constantly growing field which is changing so the fact you say it's useless makes no sense...

https://www.investopedia.com/terms/a...tworks-ann.asp
AI is very different discipline ANN has nothing to with biology, zero, it's a postgrad applied mathematics. I am sorry but 3 weeks long intro to statistics mid biology degree wont make the cut.
This is a very simple forward pass, no LSTM, transformers or back prop, nothing HTM like.
Simple 101 intro to a basic Neural Networks design. Nothing like ANN or GAN
Name:  2020-07-14.png
Views: 85
Size:  32.0 KB

It's not biology, is it?
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Dechante
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(Original post by Mojmeer)
AI is very different discipline ANN has nothing to with biology, zero, it's a postgrad applied mathematics. I am sorry but 3 weeks long intro to statistics mid biology degree wont make the cut.
This is a very simple forward pass, no LSTM, transformers or back prop, nothing HTM like.
Simple 101 intro to a basic Neural Networks design. Nothing like ANN or GAN
Name:  2020-07-14.png
Views: 85
Size:  32.0 KB

It's not biology, is it?
I get what you're saying but I was just saying what I have been told from universities and students and my own research while chewing my degree. Several people go onto do masters on computer science or AI with data science though. My uni offers a placement year for people to look into ANN and was told that there's a demand for neuroscientists to work in artificial intellegence. As for marketing, there's someone I know who has just got funding to be in neuromarketing for a business.

Here is what I was trying to say:
https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-prof...qualifications
''There is a range of factors currently driving growth in the number of neuroscientists around the world. For example, as people continue to live longer, there is an increase in funding to tackle problems with age-related neurological decline such as dementia. Also, as artificial intelligence continues to evolve, there is demand for neuroscientists to create smarter interfaces between humans and machines. The rapid evolution of brain imaging techniques means that neuroscientists are in a unique position to share insights into human behaviour.

These developments mean that there are good opportunities to progress your career in a wide range of industries, including government policy, education and business. It can take time to get established, however, and develop your career in your chosen area. Flexibility in terms of relocation to find work is helpful.''

Truth be told though most degrees now are highly competitive and I don't really believe in the whole useless vs worth it degree debate but I understand where you're coming from. I would rather just do a degree I prefer and have an interest in than be stuck in something I hate and be unhappy so I end up with worse grades.

Sorry, if my words came out wrong. I wasn't trying to say it's biology based but more the skills (like maths) you learn from the degree that you apply to ANN or AI. I was also trying to make the point of neuroscience is constantly growing but I don't want to seem like I'm an expert on AI and you will def know more than me but this is what I have learnt from research and been told by neuroscientists
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no-brainer
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(Original post by Mojmeer)
AI is very different discipline ANN has nothing to with biology, zero, it's a postgrad applied mathematics. I am sorry but 3 weeks long intro to statistics mid biology degree wont make the cut.
This is a very simple forward pass, no LSTM, transformers or back prop, nothing HTM like.
Simple 101 intro to a basic Neural Networks design. Nothing like ANN or GAN
Name:  2020-07-14.png
Views: 85
Size:  32.0 KB

It's not biology, is it?
https://towardsdatascience.com/the-f...e-89189218bb05
https://www.psy.ox.ac.uk/research/ox...l-intelligence
I don't know where you're getting your information from but there are strong links between artificial intelligence and neuroscience so I don't get how you have said you're such a nerd to it and spoke in an unkind manner to Dechante. There's numerous links which show how neuroscience is evolving and the applications of neuroscience to AI.
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Dechante
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Also OP I forgot to add this thread of a question I asked very similar to yours and a bsc neuroscience graduate when I was questioning my degree https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho...642&highlight=
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pya123
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(Original post by Dechante)
Also OP I forgot to add this thread of a question I asked very similar to yours and a bsc neuroscience graduate when I was questioning my degree https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho...642&highlight=
Thank you so much! You have given me such great insight and I appreciate it!
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pya123
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(Original post by no-brainer)
https://towardsdatascience.com/the-f...e-89189218bb05
https://www.psy.ox.ac.uk/research/ox...l-intelligence
I don't know where you're getting your information from but there are strong links between artificial intelligence and neuroscience so I don't get how you have said you're such a nerd to it and spoke in an unkind manner to Dechante. There's numerous links which show how neuroscience is evolving and the applications of neuroscience to AI.
Thank you!!
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QuentinM
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(Original post by pya123)
Hi everyone, does anyone have any advice on what studying neuroscience at university is like and where it may lead to?
Not sure how helpful all the stuff below has been (especially given theres been no neuroscientists replying above as far as I can tell?). As someone who did a Medical Sciences degree (specialising in neuroscience), an MRes in Biosciences (specialising in neuroscience) and now on a PhD in Neuroscience, here's my take.

Really I'd counter your question with another one-do you have any idea what you would like to do in the future?

A neuroscience degree usually covers a lot of molecular stuff, as I understand it, so I'd say if you would really like to go into research in some way (e.g. drug research or understanding mechanisms of neurological disease), it may be worth looking into. Personally I wanted to do a Neuroscience degree, ended up doing a more general medical sciences degree and tailored my optional modules/research projects to neuroscience. This gave me a wide understanding of a range of biological topics-something you may get in most neuroscience degrees anyway. I've gone down the research route, currently studying mechanisms of disease associated with ALS, but honestly your degree title isn't too relevant there, its more the experience you bring when you apply for something like a PhD.

Although psychology will be linked, most neuroscience courses don't focus enough on psychology. If you are interested in that, do a psychology degree, it will be far more useful. As for all the AI stuff mentioned above...that feels more relevant to computer science related degrees, where I would be far less help advising you.

Obviously as with all biology degrees, you may choose not to go into research afterwards. You'd still be an appealing candidate for other jobs (e.g. for finance, teaching). Honestly if your goal is one of those jobs, it may be more worthwhile doing a different degree. Maybe that's related to my personal beliefs (I'm not a fan of people doing degrees purely out of personal interest, instead of for advancing their career, but that's a choice for you not me)
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Dechante
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(Original post by QuentinM)
Not sure how helpful all the stuff below has been (especially given theres been no neuroscientists replying above as far as I can tell?). As someone who did a Medical Sciences degree (specialising in neuroscience), an MRes in Biosciences (specialising in neuroscience) and now on a PhD in Neuroscience, here's my take.
Was the medical sciences degree specialising in neuroscience at Exeter by any chance? If so, would you mind sharing your experience of the course there and how you found the uni
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pya123
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(Original post by QuentinM)
Not sure how helpful all the stuff below has been (especially given theres been no neuroscientists replying above as far as I can tell?). As someone who did a Medical Sciences degree (specialising in neuroscience), an MRes in Biosciences (specialising in neuroscience) and now on a PhD in Neuroscience, here's my take.

Really I'd counter your question with another one-do you have any idea what you would like to do in the future?

A neuroscience degree usually covers a lot of molecular stuff, as I understand it, so I'd say if you would really like to go into research in some way (e.g. drug research or understanding mechanisms of neurological disease), it may be worth looking into. Personally I wanted to do a Neuroscience degree, ended up doing a more general medical sciences degree and tailored my optional modules/research projects to neuroscience. This gave me a wide understanding of a range of biological topics-something you may get in most neuroscience degrees anyway. I've gone down the research route, currently studying mechanisms of disease associated with ALS, but honestly your degree title isn't too relevant there, its more the experience you bring when you apply for something like a PhD.

Although psychology will be linked, most neuroscience courses don't focus enough on psychology. If you are interested in that, do a psychology degree, it will be far more useful. As for all the AI stuff mentioned above...that feels more relevant to computer science related degrees, where I would be far less help advising you.

Obviously as with all biology degrees, you may choose not to go into research afterwards. You'd still be an appealing candidate for other jobs (e.g. for finance, teaching). Honestly if your goal is one of those jobs, it may be more worthwhile doing a different degree. Maybe that's related to my personal beliefs (I'm not a fan of people doing degrees purely out of personal interest, instead of for advancing their career, but that's a choice for you not me)
Thank you so much! Your explanation is really helpful!
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Mojmeer
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(Original post by no-brainer)
https://towardsdatascience.com/the-f...e-89189218bb05
https://www.psy.ox.ac.uk/research/ox...l-intelligence
I don't know where you're getting your information from but there are strong links between artificial intelligence and neuroscience so I don't get how you have said you're such a nerd to it and spoke in an unkind manner to Dechante. There's numerous links which show how neuroscience is evolving and the applications of neuroscience to AI.
Where exactly are those "strong links" like what exactly can you do as a biologist in a company building drones or self driving cars? Please be specific.
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Mojmeer
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(Original post by QuentinM)
Not sure how helpful all the stuff below has been (especially given theres been no neuroscientists replying above as far as I can tell?). As someone who did a Medical Sciences degree (specialising in neuroscience), an MRes in Biosciences (specialising in neuroscience) and now on a PhD in Neuroscience, here's my take.

Really I'd counter your question with another one-do you have any idea what you would like to do in the future?

A neuroscience degree usually covers a lot of molecular stuff, as I understand it, so I'd say if you would really like to go into research in some way (e.g. drug research or understanding mechanisms of neurological disease), it may be worth looking into. Personally I wanted to do a Neuroscience degree, ended up doing a more general medical sciences degree and tailored my optional modules/research projects to neuroscience. This gave me a wide understanding of a range of biological topics-something you may get in most neuroscience degrees anyway. I've gone down the research route, currently studying mechanisms of disease associated with ALS, but honestly your degree title isn't too relevant there, its more the experience you bring when you apply for something like a PhD.

Although psychology will be linked, most neuroscience courses don't focus enough on psychology. If you are interested in that, do a psychology degree, it will be far more useful. As for all the AI stuff mentioned above...that feels more relevant to computer science related degrees, where I would be far less help advising you.

Obviously as with all biology degrees, you may choose not to go into research afterwards. You'd still be an appealing candidate for other jobs (e.g. for finance, teaching). Honestly if your goal is one of those jobs, it may be more worthwhile doing a different degree. Maybe that's related to my personal beliefs (I'm not a fan of people doing degrees purely out of personal interest, instead of for advancing their career, but that's a choice for you not me)
Kids sadly assume that there is a relevant link between degree in descriptive biology (neuroscience) and applied mathematics(AI) just because it has "neuro" in it's name...
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(Original post by no-brainer)
https://towardsdatascience.com/the-f...e-89189218bb05
https://www.psy.ox.ac.uk/research/ox...l-intelligence
I don't know where you're getting your information from but there are strong links between artificial intelligence and neuroscience so I don't get how you have said you're such a nerd to it and spoke in an unkind manner to Dechante. There's numerous links which show how neuroscience is evolving and the applications of neuroscience to AI.
No one is denying how useful AI software, machine learning and other related technologies are to neuroscience, undoubtedly they are vary important. Someone else in my lab (of biologists) recently published a review on this topic in treating ALS. However I can pretty much guarantee you they wouldn't know how to use this software by virtue of being trained neuroscientists (aka having studied a biology degree). Any work done using these kinds of software would be in collaboration with someone from a maths/computer science department, using their technology to, say, analyse data.

If you want to consider that neuroscience...I'd say that's fair, BUT this is very far from what would be covered on a neuroscience course. Honestly I'm not aware of a neuroscience course on the planet that effectively bridges the gap between biological study of the brain and using mathematics/technology (and I've spoken at length to several people who got caught on the wrong side of this). Its sorely needed but wishful thinking to suggest it already exists
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