Has anyone done Starting Strength? If so help me out!

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OptiWeight
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Hello,

I have purchased the starting strength, however i'm not understanding something such as 2-5-3k caloories. Isn't this too much? I am on 2.5k deficient, so will i gain muscle.
Also, i have purchased a barbell with 50kg weights. My bench press is lacking as i can barely lift 20 kg, so how can i add weight after each session?
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Dax_Swagg3r
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Follow what the program says. And why are you on a 2.5k kcal deficit?
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OptiWeight
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because i normally eat more than 2.5k calories and want to loose weight
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Dax_Swagg3r
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(Original post by OptiWeight)
because i normally eat more than 2.5k calories and want to loose weight
WHat is your tdee?
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Calibrated.
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(Original post by OptiWeight)
Also, i have purchased a barbell with 50kg weights. My bench press is lacking as i can barely lift 20 kg, so how can i add weight after each session?
What are the weights of the individual plates you purchased? They should include a pair of 1.25 kg plates, allowing you to add weight to the barbell in 2.5 kg intervals.
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OptiWeight
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(Original post by Dax_Swagg3r)
WHat is your tdee?
3000 Calories
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OptiWeight
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(Original post by Calibrated.)
What are the weights of the individual plates you purchased? They should include a pair of 1.25 kg plates, allowing you to add weight to the barbell in 2.5 kg intervals.
https://www.argos.co.uk/product/6145...mg' />37:1

This is the one which i bought
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Dax_Swagg3r
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(Original post by OptiWeight)
3000 Calories
So you are eating 500kals?
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OptiWeight
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(Original post by Dax_Swagg3r)
So you are eating 500kals?
Nope.

I normally eat 3000 kals however i am obese so i did a deficient where i ate 2500kcal
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Khanthebrit
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Read the big blue book called 'Starting Strength' for a start, it can be a little confusing when it comes to muscle anatomy, but will certainly teach you the fundamentals of how to perform the lifts and give you a foundation from which to build off in your strength training knowledge and performance.

Secondly, unless you intend to buy your own home gym, which I believe for a decent quality would cost you £1000+, get yourself a gym membership. You'll need a Power Rack for Squats and Overhead Press (if you intend not to clean the bar from the floor), a bench, and a good quality bar (20kg) that won't bend. Gyms generally provide this. Not to mention ideally bumper plates (2 - 6 pairs of 20kg, 1pair 10kg, 2 pairs 5kg, 1 pair 2.5kg, 1 pair 1.25kg). This is what you'll require to linearly load. Note that the 20kgs must be of the deadlift diameter to perform the lift correctly.

Onto your question - unless you're some form of genetic freak, you won't gain muscle mass and strength on a 2500kcal diet. You mention your obese, so I suggest a 3000kcal low dairy diet. Your Bodyweight should remain the same while your BF% goes down initially, to begin with as you gain strength. As you progress, you may find you will need to adjust based on your performance, but 3000kcal is a good start. Weigh your every 2 weeks to find if you're eating too much. I won't lie, Mark Rippetoe isn't a genius when it comes to diet. Don't do GOMAD or 6000kcal.

Finally, I'm sorry, but what you bought is not suitable for the programme and won't work. You're missing a power rack, a bench and can't linearly load to cause the stress - adapt - recovery cycle. More importantly, the programme is designed to get you pushing serious weight within just a few months, it will not be uncommon to see your squat and deadlift go up by 200 - 300 lbs (90kg - 140kg increase) by the end of the programme. The bar won't be able to support such numbers, more importantly, how can you rack it onto your shoulders to squat safely without the rack? BUY YOURSELF A GYM MEMBERSHIP!!!

Follow the programme as prescribed. Start off practising form for something that feels easy. Then cumulatively add weight to the bar according to your strength levels (in your case I'd say 2.5kg each time) for reps of 5 until you notice the bar speed significantly slow down and bar speed changes. Stick with that for 2 more sets and that is your beginning weight, which you will add 2.5kg to in the next bench workout providing you eat enough and sleep 8hrs.

I did the programme. Couldn't bench the bar to begin with. SS got me to about 75kg x 5 on the bench, moved to intermediate after that and now at 105kg x 5. I would highly recommend reading the book to get a serious idea on what you need for the programme, and how it works.
Last edited by Khanthebrit; 2 weeks ago
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Dax_Swagg3r
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(Original post by OptiWeight)
Nope.

I normally eat 3000 kals however i am obese so i did a deficient where i ate 2500kcal
Okay so thats a 500kcal deficit not a 2.5kkcal deficit.
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OptiWeight
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(Original post by Dax_Swagg3r)
Okay so thats a 500kcal deficit not a 2.5kkcal deficit.
Sorry!
Thats what i meant
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OptiWeight
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(Original post by Khanthebrit)
Read the big blue book called 'Starting Strength' for a start, it can be a little confusing when it comes to muscle anatomy, but will certainly teach you the fundamentals of how to perform the lifts and give you a foundation from which to build off in your strength training knowledge and performance.

Secondly, unless you intend to buy your own home gym, which I believe for a decent quality would cost you £1000+, get yourself a gym membership. You'll need a Power Rack for Squats and Overhead Press (if you intend not to clean the bar from the floor), a bench, and a good quality bar (20kg) that won't bend. Gyms generally provide this. Not to mention ideally bumper plates (2 - 6 pairs of 20kg, 1pair 10kg, 2 pairs 5kg, 1 pair 2.5kg, 1 pair 1.25kg). This is what you'll require to linearly load. Note that the 20kgs must be of the deadlift diameter to perform the lift correctly.

Onto your question - unless you're some form of genetic freak, you won't gain muscle mass and strength on a 2500kcal diet. You mention your obese, so I suggest a 3000kcal low dairy diet. Your Bodyweight should remain the same while your BF% goes down initially, to begin with as you gain strength. As you progress, you may find you will need to adjust based on your performance, but 3000kcal is a good start. Weigh your every 2 weeks to find if you're eating too much. I won't lie, Mark Rippetoe isn't a genius when it comes to diet. Don't do GOMAD or 6000kcal.

Finally, I'm sorry, but what you bought is not suitable for the programme and won't work. You're missing a power rack, a bench and can't linearly load to cause the stress - adapt - recovery cycle. More importantly, the programme is designed to get you pushing serious weight within just a few months, it will not be uncommon to see your squat and deadlift go up by 200 - 300 lbs (90kg - 140kg increase) by the end of the programme. The bar won't be able to support such numbers, more importantly, how can you rack it onto your shoulders to squat safely without the rack? BUY YOURSELF A GYM MEMBERSHIP!!!

Follow the programme as prescribed. Start off practising form for something that feels easy. Then cumulatively add weight to the bar according to your strength levels (in your case I'd say 2.5kg each time) for reps of 5 until you notice the bar speed significantly slow down and bar speed changes. Stick with that for 2 more sets and that is your beginning weight, which you will add 2.5kg to in the next bench workout providing you eat enough and sleep 8hrs.

I did the programme. Couldn't bench the bar to begin with. SS got me to about 75kg x 5 on the bench, moved to intermediate after that and now at 105kg x 5. I would highly recommend reading the book to get a serious idea on what you need for the programme, and how it works.
Thank you i can see where i might have gone wrong. Yeah i heard the 3000 calories is the only conversation thing about starting strength.
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Cambrian80
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Hi, I followed Starting Strength when I first started exercising. It can be a very effective strength building programme if followed correctly - for example, my deadlift went from 80kg to 180kg over about 12 months.

However, it is brutal programme if you follow it correctly as it focuses on adding weight pretty much every week, which becomes very hard. As mentioned by Khanthebrit above, the programme revolves around the squat, benchpress, deadlift and overhead press - so you really need a powerrack/squat rack to do it.

You can get "micro" plates online to help with progressing the weight. I got a pair of 0.5kg plates on Amazon, which were useful for progressing the benchpress and, particularly, the overhead press.

The programme has some big limitations though:
1. It has a very small selection of exercises, which can become very repetitive and can lead to hyper-specialisation.
2. The programme involves adding weight to the bar every week (regardless of things like fatigue, stress etc.), which is not the most intelligent way to train. More modern training methods using RPE or reps in reserve, have been shown to be more effective.
3. The nutrition advice, particularly from Rippertoe, is woeful.
4. The programme has very little useful advice regarding conditioning/cardio.

If I was going to start training again knowing what I know now, I wouldn't choose SS. My recommendation would be to check out Barbell Medicine - it's run by former SS coaches who went their own way because they wanted to coach using more modern methods (which SS does not like!). Their beginner programme is still focused on building strength quickly, but involves a wider variety of exercises and more conditioning, to build a better fitness base. The nutrition advice is also very good.
https://www.barbellmedicine.com/blog...-prescription/
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OptiWeight
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(Original post by Cambrian80)
Hi, I followed Starting Strength when I first started exercising. It can be a very effective strength building programme if followed correctly - for example, my deadlift went from 80kg to 180kg over about 12 months.

However, it is brutal programme if you follow it correctly as it focuses on adding weight pretty much every week, which becomes very hard. As mentioned by Khanthebrit above, the programme revolves around the squat, benchpress, deadlift and overhead press - so you really need a powerrack/squat rack to do it.

You can get "micro" plates online to help with progressing the weight. I got a pair of 0.5kg plates on Amazon, which were useful for progressing the benchpress and, particularly, the overhead press.

The programme has some big limitations though:
1. It has a very small selection of exercises, which can become very repetitive and can lead to hyper-specialisation.
2. The programme involves adding weight to the bar every week (regardless of things like fatigue, stress etc.), which is not the most intelligent way to train. More modern training methods using RPE or reps in reserve, have been shown to be more effective.
3. The nutrition advice, particularly from Rippertoe, is woeful.
4. The programme has very little useful advice regarding conditioning/cardio.

If I was going to start training again knowing what I know now, I wouldn't choose SS. My recommendation would be to check out Barbell Medicine - it's run by former SS coaches who went their own way because they wanted to coach using more modern methods (which SS does not like!). Their beginner programme is still focused on building strength quickly, but involves a wider variety of exercises and more conditioning, to build a better fitness base. The nutrition advice is also very good.
https://www.barbellmedicine.com/blog...-prescription/
I will check this out. Thanks
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