Anonymous #1
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I'm about to start my undergrad, and intend to do a PGCE (or PGDE as I might move to Scotland) following this. I'm a trans man, and I've been thinking I'd really like to be openly trans at work when I start teaching, but I'm worried about possible backlash potentially being too much?
Where in the UK is likely to be safest in this regard? I know it's a way off and things could change but with all the stuff going on at the moment I've been thinking about it lots.
And please don't come on here to be transphobic, I will just report you.
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Anonymous #1
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I realised I forgot to mention this before, not sure if it makes a difference, but I intend to teach music at secondary level (including ones with sixth forms).
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Hannah0505
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You might get bullied by the kids.., if you teach somewhere in like the bristol you should be okay tho.
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Anonymous #2
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Unfortunately, it may be difficult to be openly trans in a school workplace.

Best of luck though!
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Hannah0505)
You might get bullied by the kids.., if you teach somewhere in like the bristol you should be okay tho.
I know, I'm hoping things'll be better by that time, but who knows. I've never been to Bristol, but thanks for the suggestion!

(Original post by Anonymous)
Unfortunately, it may be difficult to be openly trans in a school workplace.

Best of luck though!
I know, I really want to be there for the kids though y'know, cause when I was getting picked on at school, cis teachers didn't really get it, or being trans in general. Plus I think it's important for young LGBTQ+ kids to see people like them being successful in living normal fulfilling lives.
When I did work experience before lockdown though, there was a non-binary sub I met a few times, and apparently kids were really respectful of their pronouns, so I have some hope.
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Abzzz57
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Hi, I think this generation or the ones to come are a lot more open and accepting, hopefully when you end up teaching the world will be a lot different. There are more and more classes and social media stars etc who are part of the LGBTQ community. So I wouldn't worry to much! Follow your dream and do what you want to do, and don't worry about what other people will think..

Also, in the equality act they specifically mention trans people so you can't be discriminated against.. I hope it works out for you!
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EierVonSatan
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I know, I really want to be there for the kids though y'know, cause when I was getting picked on at school, cis teachers didn't really get it, or being trans in general. Plus I think it's important for young LGBTQ+ kids to see people like them being successful in living normal fulfilling lives.
When I did work experience before lockdown though, there was a non-binary sub I met a few times, and apparently kids were really respectful of their pronouns, so I have some hope.
Awareness around this is much better than it was say 10 years ago.

Most of the time, kids are respectful and understanding. But you will get negative remarks too, you need to be prepared for this.
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Anonymous #3
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(Original post by Abzzz57)
Hi, I think this generation or the ones to come are a lot more open and accepting, hopefully when you end up teaching the world will be a lot different. There are more and more classes and social media stars etc who are part of the LGBTQ community. So I wouldn't worry to much! Follow your dream and do what you want to do, and don't worry about what other people will think..

Also, in the equality act they specifically mention trans people so you can't be discriminated against.. I hope it works out for you!
Unfortunately this is not the case. Kids will still be immature and this teacher will certainly experience comments from younger years 7-9 and maybe even some sixth formers. It's harsh reality that children at school are mostly immature. Even if you go to a private school you will experience certain kids that are like this. Doesn't matter whether you're in Plymouth or Porthsmouth, don't be surprised if you experience rude kids, it's just how school children are. NOT ALL, but from my experience growing up and attending grammar/private and comprehensive school I can testify to this.

Fellow collegues may be un easy around the trans teacher because CURRENTLY, it is not the norm. So i'd advise to not have high expections when starting work and to know that people can be rude sometimes.

But honeslty, why is there a need to be open? You're a teacher to teach, nothing else. Correct me if i'm wrong.

I've had lesbian teachers and gay teachers, they never explicitely said 'im this' or 'im that', rather they just did their job and taught us. At some points, certain kids would assume their sexual preference and would gossip and ask the teacher if it is true, to which the teacher would not deny it.

But the main point is that school is for teaching and learning. If you are trans then why do you need to be open? wouldn't it be safer to just do what you're employed to do?

I say all this for their safety because I know how kids at school are like, and this was recent not as if i'm 50 years old.

Hope I could help, correct me anywhere where i'm wrong or offensive, don't report me because I didn't mean any offence in this reply. If you feel offended then tell me and i'll apologise because i'm sick of being reported without being given a chance to apologise.

Hope OP is okay x
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Anonymous #4
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm about to start my undergrad, and intend to do a PGCE (or PGDE as I might move to Scotland) following this. I'm a trans man, and I've been thinking I'd really like to be openly trans at work when I start teaching, but I'm worried about possible backlash potentially being too much?
Where in the UK is likely to be safest in this regard? I know it's a way off and things could change but with all the stuff going on at the moment I've been thinking about it lots.
And please don't come on here to be transphobic, I will just report you.
We had a trans teacher and no one really cared. She transitioned during the time we were at school (started as a man became a women). What I would say is be openly trans but there is a risk with kids. So this teacher spoke about it in nearly every lesson instead of teaching the course to a high standard and if students who had her when she was a man accidentally said sir because they were used to it he’d give them after school detentions and scream at them.

so be open about it but I would say avoid making it a big ‘thing’ otherwise students may get bored or it. Generally kids don’t really care too much.

good luck with your teaching career!
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Hannyah_Em
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Hi, trans person here

I know there was a trans guy at my college who was a form tutor, afaik people were respectful and understanding towards him, but I didnt really see him much since I had a different form tutor, but most people at my college seemed pretty cool with lgbtq+ people, never heard much bigotry.

My high school on the other hand wasnt great, I'd hear bigoted remarks and other generally not pleasant things bein said unfortunately frequently, I hated being there, especially since high school was when I first realised I was trans, I definitely wouldn't have felt safe coming out and presenting how I want there.

I went to high school and college near Leeds btw. I wish you the best of luck
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Anonymous #5
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teach at college/ Utc
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ClaudiaVan
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Hi
I’m non-binary and have just completed a post secondary PGCE in theatre arts (teaching post16 students). As I use gender neutral pronouns although my name is Claudia at birth I go by Claud now, it was difficult for students and staff to adjust however after a few weeks it got easier. I believe working in FE/HE and within the arts made it an easier journey for me, but still wasn’t without its challenges, but overall was okay as I was able to educate individuals at the same time and even ran a workshop for staff!
Being open to ask questions is always important and having open dialogues with people who may not know about lgbt/trans culture/pronouns/life may wish to find out more as to learn how to be inclusive/become more enlightened.

If you feel like disclosing then you can do so, however if you don’t that’s totally fine too.

Gender/sexuality is one of the protected characteristics and places cannot discriminate against you for your identity.
Students who have not been exposed to someone of your identity before may need help understanding keener it’s all about educating them.
I’d be wary of approaching schools which are faith based as it may be more difficult.

It doesn’t matter who you are, you have the passion and the ability to shape students lives for the better and inspire them to go on and do great things!

Good luck and you’ll be great!
Last edited by ClaudiaVan; 3 weeks ago
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remussjhj01
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(Original post by Abzzz57)
Hi, I think this generation or the ones to come are a lot more open and accepting, hopefully when you end up teaching the world will be a lot different. There are more and more classes and social media stars etc who are part of the LGBTQ community. So I wouldn't worry to much! Follow your dream and do what you want to do, and don't worry about what other people will think..

Also, in the equality act they specifically mention trans people so you can't be discriminated against.. I hope it works out for you!
I've noticed things generally seem pretty chill. My work experience was at my old secondary school, as I have anxiety and this meant I wouldn't have to deal with letting staff know. I wasn't openly trans, but I don't think they noticed (some of them were explaining transitioning to me and what cis meant). I was openly bi though (spoke about my then bf in the same way teachers mention their partners in passing). I'm hoping that it might be a similar case for if I chose to be openly trans.

(Original post by EierVonSatan)
Awareness around this is much better than it was say 10 years ago.

Most of the time, kids are respectful and understanding. But you will get negative remarks too, you need to be prepared for this.
Yeah, there was a non-binary sub, and I found people were very respectful of them (though I didn't know them that well).

(Original post by Anonymous)
We had a trans teacher and no one really cared. She transitioned during the time we were at school (started as a man became a women). What I would say is be openly trans but there is a risk with kids. So this teacher spoke about it in nearly every lesson instead of teaching the course to a high standard and if students who had her when she was a man accidentally said sir because they were used to it he’d give them after school detentions and scream at them.

so be open about it but I would say avoid making it a big ‘thing’ otherwise students may get bored or it. Generally kids don’t really care too much.

good luck with your teaching career!
Tbh I think if the students were consistently calling her sir, I can understand some form of punishment. If it was any other female teacher, they'd probably do the same thing.
When I was doing work experience, I did get misgendered by some year 8s (I have reason to believe I was outed by my brother's friends, who are in year 8). I personally just corrected them, but the teachers I was working with said if it happens again, I should let him know and he'd deal with it.
I personally should be on testosterone by the time I start teaching, so I shouldn't have this issue. However, I will not put up with transphobic (or otherwise bigoted) remarks, as I feel kids are often let away with things like this, especially if they're not directed at anyone.
Thank you!
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EierVonSatan
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(Original post by remussjhj01)
When I was doing work experience, I did get misgendered by some year 8s (I have reason to believe I was outed by my brother's friends, who are in year 8). I personally just corrected them, but the teachers I was working with said if it happens again, I should let him know and he'd deal with it.
I personally should be on testosterone by the time I start teaching, so I shouldn't have this issue. However, I will not put up with transphobic (or otherwise bigoted) remarks, as I feel kids are often let away with things like this, especially if they're not directed at anyone.
Thank you!
Just to make the point; I as a cisgendered male am sometimes called 'miss' by mistake Probably once every two weeks or so :mmm:

It's not always going to be intentional and you'll get better at working out if it is as you go. You're right, though, if you think it was intentional you need to nip it in the bud, calmly :yes:
Last edited by EierVonSatan; 3 weeks ago
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SarcAndSpark
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Yeah, as a cisgendered female I get called Sir sometimes too, as well. I also teach a couple of trans kids and students will occasionally accidentally misgender them, which I deal with in a relatively low key way- whereas if I think it's deliberate then obviously it needs to be dealt with differently. However, equally, if a student does it as a genuine accident, and you have an extreme reaction, I think this could damage your relationship with students.

I think for OP and others, there will be negative comments, although maybe not as many as you think. I think teenagers especially are far more accepting of LGBT+ staff/students than they were even 10 years ago, certainly 15/20 years ago.

FWIW, I think what you really need to be prepared for are questions, because the students will have questions, and not all of these questions will be comfortable for you/appropriate to answer. There might be potential for you to get questions about your genitalia, for example. It might be because I'm a biology teacher, and the content I teach, but I have had questions from students that veer into inappropriate (E.g. if I was on the pill, about my sex life and so on) and I think you do need to find a way of dealing with this.

I think it's also important to bear in mind that these questions can derail a lesson quite quickly, so you may feel the need to put a time limit on questions, or to maybe just do a couple at the end of a lesson, or something like that.

I'd also just say- and I know this is maybe a bit cowardly of me- but as a bisexual teacher I am always very aware that it's something that once I've said it, I can't take back. I'm sort of "softly" out at school, in that I don't lie if the students ask me, but I don't announce it or publicise the fact either, and I wasn't out at my placement schools.
Last edited by SarcAndSpark; 3 weeks ago
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remussjhj01
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(Original post by Hannyah_Em)
Hi, trans person here

I know there was a trans guy at my college who was a form tutor, afaik people were respectful and understanding towards him, but I didnt really see him much since I had a different form tutor, but most people at my college seemed pretty cool with lgbtq+ people, never heard much bigotry.

My high school on the other hand wasnt great, I'd hear bigoted remarks and other generally not pleasant things being said unfortunately frequently, I hated being there, especially since high school was when I first realised I was trans, I definitely wouldn't have felt safe coming out and presenting how I want there.

I went to high school and college near Leeds btw. I wish you the best of luck
I had this when I came out at school too! It sucks!
My plan is to work in a school that has an attached sixth form, as I'd really like to teach a-level too, so hopefully that will balance things out aha.
That's great there was an openly trans teacher at your college though. I've lost track of how many times I've had to explain dysphoria to people!

(Original post by Anonymous)
teach at college/ Utc
I intend/hope to teach at a school with an attached sixth form.

(Original post by ClaudiaVan)
Hi
I’m non-binary and have just completed a post secondary PGCE in theatre arts (teaching post16 students). As I use gender neutral pronouns although my name is Claudia at birth I go by Claud now, it was difficult for students and staff to adjust however after a few weeks it got easier. I believe working in FE/HE and within the arts made it an easier journey for me, but still wasn’t without its challenges, but overall was okay as I was able to educate individuals at the same time and even ran a workshop for staff!

If you feel like disclosing then you can do so, however if you don’t that’s totally fine too.

Gender/sexuality is one of the protected characteristics and places cannot discriminate against you for your identity.
Students who have not been exposed to someone of your identity before may need help understanding keener it’s all about educating them.
I’d be wary of approaching schools which are faith based as it may be more difficult.

It doesn’t matter who you are, you have the passion and the ability to shape students lives for the better and inspire them to go on and do great things!

Good luck and you’ll be great!
Yeah, I suppose you have to be open if you're non-binary. I do hope to work partially in FE, but also at ks3 and ks4.
I'm generally very happy to educate people on most things, as I understand most people won't have had exposure to an actual trans person before.
I didn't think there were that many faith schools at secondary level (I can only think of one fairly local one).
Thank you!

(Original post by Anonymous)
Unfortunately this is not the case. Kids will still be immature and this teacher will certainly experience comments from younger years 7-9 and maybe even some sixth formers. It's harsh reality that children at school are mostly immature. Even if you go to a private school you will experience certain kids that are like this. Doesn't matter whether you're in Plymouth or Porthsmouth, don't be surprised if you experience rude kids, it's just how school children are. NOT ALL, but from my experience growing up and attending grammar/private and comprehensive school I can testify to this.

Fellow collegues may be un easy around the trans teacher because CURRENTLY, it is not the norm. So i'd advise to not have high expections when starting work and to know that people can be rude sometimes.

But honeslty, why is there a need to be open? You're a teacher to teach, nothing else. Correct me if i'm wrong.

I've had lesbian teachers and gay teachers, they never explicitely said 'im this' or 'im that', rather they just did their job and taught us. At some points, certain kids would assume their sexual preference and would gossip and ask the teacher if it is true, to which the teacher would not deny it.

But the main point is that school is for teaching and learning. If you are trans then why do you need to be open? wouldn't it be safer to just do what you're employed to do?

I say all this for their safety because I know how kids at school are like, and this was recent not as if i'm 50 years old.

Hope I could help, correct me anywhere where i'm wrong or offensive, don't report me because I didn't mean any offence in this reply. If you feel offended then tell me and i'll apologise because i'm sick of being reported without being given a chance to apologise.

Hope OP is okay x
Hi, I do totally get what you're saying, it would be safer, but the reason I want to be out is for young trans people to a). have someone to go to if they're questioning, being harassed/bullied etc and b). so they can see that, despite the fact things could be hard atm, it's totally possible to live a totally normal life. I didn't have any openly trans teachers, so I felt really alone, as no one understood the effect the things people were saying had on me. And it's important for cis people to see trans people as normal people who are just a bit different in a way that doesn't really effect anything about whatever relationship they may have with them.

(Original post by TheTruthPrevails)
they probably wont notice your trans, also why do strangers need to know your sexuality/gender
They probably won't, you're right, but please see above. I do have my reasons.
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remussjhj01
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(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
Yeah, as a cisgendered female I get called Sir sometimes too, as well. I also teach a couple of trans kids and students will occasionally accidentally misgender them, which I deal with in a relatively low key way- whereas if I think it's deliberate then obviously it needs to be dealt with differently. However, equally, if a student does it as a genuine accident, and you have an extreme reaction, I think this could damage your relationship with students.

I think for OP and others, there will be negative comments, although maybe not as many as you think. I think teenagers especially are far more accepting of LGBT+ staff/students than they were even 10 years ago, certainly 15/20 years ago.

FWIW, I think what you really need to be prepared for are questions, because the students will have questions, and not all of these questions will be comfortable for you/appropriate to answer. There might be potential for you to get questions about your genitalia, for example. It might be because I'm a biology teacher, and the content I teach, but I have had questions from students that veer into inappropriate (E.g. if I was on the pill, about my sex life and so on) and I think you do need to find a way of dealing with this.

I think it's also important to bear in mind that these questions can derail a lesson quite quickly, so you may feel the need to put a time limit on questions, or to maybe just do a couple at the end of a lesson, or something like that.

I'd also just say- and I know this is maybe a bit cowardly of me- but as a bisexual teacher I am always very aware that it's something that once I've said it, I can't take back. I'm sort of "softly" out at school, in that I don't lie if the students ask me, but I don't announce it or publicise the fact either, and I wasn't out at my placement schools.
I'm actually really fine with answering most questions. I'd prefer if they kept it out of lessons where possible, as I'm going to be a music teacher, so it won't be relevant but if they want to know about being trans or whatever. Obviously I won't answer questions about genitalia or surgery, but stuff like when I came out, how I knew or whatever are fine.
On my work experience, whilst I wasn't out, I did see/hear lots of support for trans people, and I'm hoping it stays that way.
Thanks for the help!
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Dexter345
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(Original post by Hannah0505)
You might get bullied by the kids.., if you teach somewhere in like the bristol you should be okay tho.
Why would it be okay in Bristol?
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ThatGuy89
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I mean this in the nicest possible way, but your gender or sexuality or your personal life isn't relevant to the education of the kids. As long as you do your job properly and teach, I don't see why it would ever need to come up. You will never know these kids beyond a student teacher relationship. I couldnt tell you anything about my teachers other than if they were tough or soft educators.
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remussjhj01
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(Original post by ThatGuy89)
I mean this in the nicest possible way, but your gender or sexuality or your personal life isn't relevant to the education of the kids. As long as you do your job properly and teach, I don't see why it would ever need to come up. You will never know these kids beyond a student teacher relationship. I couldnt tell you anything about my teachers other than if they were tough or soft educators.
I have answered a similar question to this but I'll do it again.
I have my reasons for wanting to be open. Firstly, I want to be there for trans or questioning kids having any issues who might want to ask questions. I felt so alone when I was at school and college because I was pretty much the only trans kid in any given room, all the time, and no one understood the things I was going through and how the things people were saying to me affected me.
Secondly, I think it's important for kids, both cis and trans, to see a trans person living a normal, and most importantly, HAPPY life. Everything can feel so hopeless when you're 15, can't get your name changed, gender changed, no hormones or surgery, no one's respecting your identity and people are bullying you, calling you a freak and a tr*nny. That is all sh*t that was happening to me when I was 15 and in school. And cis people need to see this so they can understand trans people aren't weird freaks who are incapable of being functioning member of society, that we're actual normal people who live normal lives.
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