Hannah0505
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(Original post by Dexter345)
Why would it be okay in Bristol?
Bristol is very open minded to lgbt people
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Admit-One
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(Re: Comments about why someone might want to be open about being trans) Whilst someones sexuality may never come up in the normal course of employment, their gender identity almost certainly will, e.g. their title and preferred pronouns. There's also the matter that trans representation is important, especially to young people, so people may just prefer to disclose.

I'm CIS myself, (so take this with a pinch of salt), but I would imagine that larger, more metropolitan areas would generally be more accepting. But anywhere you go, you still might be the first trans person that many people have met. Unfortunately some kids and less progressive colleagues might be less tolerant. I suppose that's a personal choice as to whether any impoliteness is worth dealing with.

My Uni has at least one openly trans professor, and I have trans family members too. Societal change takes time, but I'm glad to see it happening in my lifetime.
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by remussjhj01)
I'm actually really fine with answering most questions. I'd prefer if they kept it out of lessons where possible, as I'm going to be a music teacher, so it won't be relevant but if they want to know about being trans or whatever. Obviously I won't answer questions about genitalia or surgery, but stuff like when I came out, how I knew or whatever are fine.
On my work experience, whilst I wasn't out, I did see/hear lots of support for trans people, and I'm hoping it stays that way.
Thanks for the help!
I think it's likely that if you tell students, you'll get questions in that lesson, but it's fine to say you'll do 10 minutes of questions or whatever and then back onto the subject of the lesson. I know teachers who get questions every lesson about being vegan or some other thing the kids find interesting/unusual, so I think you will have to find a way of shutting this down gently, and moving back to the lesson topic!

I think unfortunately it is likely you'd be asked about genitalia/surgery- some kids just don't have boundaries, so again you'd need to find a kind way of shutting this down and explaining why you can't answer that.

I think it's good for students (not just trans students) to have role models of all sexualities/gender identities- I'd definitely discuss your plans to be out with your uni tutor and school mentor prior to coming out, just so they aren't blind sided and can support you if there are any issues.
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by Admit-One)
(Re: Comments about why someone might want to be open about being trans) Whilst someones sexuality may never come up in the normal course of employment, their gender identity almost certainly will, e.g. their title and preferred pronouns. There's also the matter that trans representation is important, especially to young people, so people may just prefer to disclose.

I'm CIS myself, (so take this with a pinch of salt), but I would imagine that larger, more metropolitan areas would generally be more accepting. But anywhere you go, you still might be the first trans person that many people have met. Unfortunately some kids and less progressive colleagues might be less tolerant. I suppose that's a personal choice as to whether any impoliteness is worth dealing with.

My Uni has at least one openly trans professor, and I have trans family members too. Societal change takes time, but I'm glad to see it happening in my lifetime.
FWIW, I think sexuality does/can come up- I live in the town where I work, so doubly so, but even if teachers don't, it's not unusual to be asked "Do you have a boyfriend?" and in those situations I don't want to lie to students. And then, once you've told one, it inevitably spreads around the school rumour mill, so more students ask you!

It can be quite scary (when I was at secondary school, I saw a teacher who was gay basically hounded out of his job when he was outed) and I have had negative reactions from a small minority students, but things have moved on SO MUCH in the last 10/15 years, which is amazing!

Equally, if you are trans and pass reasonably well, the students need never know, but for some people this would be a very uncomfortable situation to be in.
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remussjhj01
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(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
I think it's likely that if you tell students, you'll get questions in that lesson, but it's fine to say you'll do 10 minutes of questions or whatever and then back onto the subject of the lesson. I know teachers who get questions every lesson about being vegan or some other thing the kids find interesting/unusual, so I think you will have to find a way of shutting this down gently, and moving back to the lesson topic!

I think unfortunately it is likely you'd be asked about genitalia/surgery- some kids just don't have boundaries, so again you'd need to find a kind way of shutting this down and explaining why you can't answer that.

I think it's good for students (not just trans students) to have role models of all sexualities/gender identities- I'd definitely discuss your plans to be out with your uni tutor and school mentor prior to coming out, just so they aren't blind sided and can support you if there are any issues.
Yeah, I think it would definitely be a good idea to at least limit the amount/timing of questions. I do think it's odd to ask about being vegan but hey, kids do weird things.
Genitalia/surgery questions will be politely declined with a 'that's not really an appropriate question'. That's what I was thinking.
Exactly what I was thinking wrt to role models!
I'll make sure to discuss it with my PGCE tutor when I start. There's a couple of teaching based modules in my degree too, so depending on what I'll have to do for that, I'll discuss it with my tutor then.
(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
FWIW, I think sexuality does/can come up- I live in the town where I work, so doubly so, but even if teachers don't, it's not unusual to be asked "Do you have a boyfriend?" and in those situations I don't want to lie to students. And then, once you've told one, it inevitably spreads around the school rumour mill, so more students ask you!

It can be quite scary (when I was at secondary school, I saw a teacher who was gay basically hounded out of his job when he was outed) and I have had negative reactions from a small minority students, but things have moved on SO MUCH in the last 10/15 years, which is amazing!

Equally, if you are trans and pass reasonably well, the students need never know, but for some people this would be a very uncomfortable situation to be in.
I totally agree! Are we really going to act like straight teachers (or teachers in opposite gender relationships) don't mention their partners in classes. It's fair to then assume that the same will occur for gay teachers, or teachers in same gender relationships.
I should be (frankly if I'm not I'll be fuming) on testosterone by then, as it won't be for 4 years at the earliest, which means I'll pass pretty well. BUT, I think it IS fairly likely I'll have to get top surgery whilst teaching though (cause I think I'll be in a position to get it on my PGCE year, but that seems like a bad idea in my head).
And I think coming out would be safer in the sense that people won't freak out if I get outed, saying I've 'lied to the children' or whatever.
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glowing_starfish
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Sorry to be the bearer of bad news but I think no where specifically is safe from discrimination
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by remussjhj01)
Yeah, I think it would definitely be a good idea to at least limit the amount/timing of questions. I do think it's odd to ask about being vegan but hey, kids do weird things.
Genitalia/surgery questions will be politely declined with a 'that's not really an appropriate question'. That's what I was thinking.
Exactly what I was thinking wrt to role models!
I'll make sure to discuss it with my PGCE tutor when I start. There's a couple of teaching based modules in my degree too, so depending on what I'll have to do for that, I'll discuss it with my tutor then.

I totally agree! Are we really going to act like straight teachers (or teachers in opposite gender relationships) don't mention their partners in classes. It's fair to then assume that the same will occur for gay teachers, or teachers in same gender relationships.
I should be (frankly if I'm not I'll be fuming) on testosterone by then, as it won't be for 4 years at the earliest, which means I'll pass pretty well. BUT, I think it IS fairly likely I'll have to get top surgery whilst teaching though (cause I think I'll be in a position to get it on my PGCE year, but that seems like a bad idea in my head).
And I think coming out would be saf
er in the sense that people won't freak out if I get outed, saying I've 'lied to the children' or whatever.
Kids are curious about anything new, in my experience. I have a friend who's a vegan teacher and the kids are genuinely fascinated by it. I think they would react to being trans differently, in the sense that some of them at least might realise some questions are rude/inappropriate. Not all students are like this, of course, but a lot of them!

I agree that getting surgery during your PGCE probably isn't ideal (if you can wait). I don't know what the recovery time is like, but I had about 8 weeks over the summer from finishing my PGCE to starting my NQT, I don't know if you could fit it in then- although I know that might be tricky and you may not be able to time it that well either.

I agree that getting outed also has risks attached to it, although obviously it shouldn't. I would try to find a line manager you feel will support you, and make sure you are in a union when you start teaching (although honestly that advice applies to everyone really).

Anyway, good luck with it all, and if you ever want to talk about anything around this, then please feel free to drop me a PM at any time next year!
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remussjhj01
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#28
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(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
Kids are curious about anything new, in my experience. I have a friend who's a vegan teacher and the kids are genuinely fascinated by it. I think they would react to being trans differently, in the sense that some of them at least might realise some questions are rude/inappropriate. Not all students are like this, of course, but a lot of them!

I agree that getting surgery during your PGCE probably isn't ideal (if you can wait). I don't know what the recovery time is like, but I had about 8 weeks over the summer from finishing my PGCE to starting my NQT, I don't know if you could fit it in then- although I know that might be tricky and you may not be able to time it that well either.

I agree that getting outed also has risks attached to it, although obviously it shouldn't. I would try to find a line manager you feel will support you, and make sure you are in a union when you start teaching (although honestly that advice applies to everyone really).

Anyway, good luck with it all, and if you ever want to talk about anything around this, then please feel free to drop me a PM at any time next year!
I think I could probably get top surgery over that summer. Apparently, you can normally go back to fairly non-strenuous work after 2 weeks, so 8 weeks should be more than enough.
And yeah, I'd rather come out by choice then be outed by someone else.
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SarcAndSpark
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#29
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(Original post by remussjhj01)
I think I could probably get top surgery over that summer. Apparently, you can normally go back to fairly non-strenuous work after 2 weeks, so 8 weeks should be more than enough.
And yeah, I'd rather come out by choice then be outed by someone else.
Fingers crossed you're able to get your surgery done then!

Good luck with it all, and I hope it works out for you. I think you've got a really sensible attitude towards everything so I hope you can make it work!
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remussjhj01
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(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
Fingers crossed you're able to get your surgery done then!

Good luck with it all, and I hope it works out for you. I think you've got a really sensible attitude towards everything so I hope you can make it work!
Thank you, I hope so too!
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ByEeek
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm about to start my undergrad, and intend to do a PGCE (or PGDE as I might move to Scotland) following this. I'm a trans man, and I've been thinking I'd really like to be openly trans at work when I start teaching, but I'm worried about possible backlash potentially being too much?
Where in the UK is likely to be safest in this regard? I know it's a way off and things could change but with all the stuff going on at the moment I've been thinking about it lots.
And please don't come on here to be transphobic, I will just report you.
Go for it. Teaching is full of all manner of personalities and people. If you hold true to who you are and master good behaviour management your gender is irrelevant. Kids respect teachers who aren't a pushover. Who you are is irrelivant to that.
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ybr20
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#32
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm about to start my undergrad, and intend to do a PGCE (or PGDE as I might move to Scotland) following this. I'm a trans man, and I've been thinking I'd really like to be openly trans at work when I start teaching, but I'm worried about possible backlash potentially being too much?
Where in the UK is likely to be safest in this regard? I know it's a way off and things could change but with all the stuff going on at the moment I've been thinking about it lots.
And please don't come on here to be transphobic, I will just report you.
You have to understand that kids will be kids and theres nothing you can do about it. Most children will be homophobic/transphobic up until a certain age anyway. However it probably wont be to your face. Also, please understand they will be kids so theres no need to cancel/try and get someone excluded because they might have not treated you the best.
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remussjhj01
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(Original post by ybr20)
You have to understand that kids will be kids and there's nothing you can do about it. Most children will be homophobic/transphobic up until a certain age anyway. However it probably wont be to your face. Also, please understand they will be kids so there's no need to cancel/try and get someone excluded because they might have not treated you the best.
You do understand though that the reason most kids are homophobic/transphobic is because of societal homophobia and transphobia? And just because they are, doesn't mean it's okay and something I, or anyone else, should have to deal with.
Persistent harassment or assault of a teacher would likely get a student suspended or excluded anyway. I'm not going to try and 'cancel' anyone, but I'm also not going to allow children to be homophobic or transphobic to me, or any students.
Education is the best weapon against ignorance and bigotry.

(Original post by ByEeek)
Go for it. Teaching is full of all manner of personalities and people. If you hold true to who you are and master good behaviour management your gender is irrelevant. Kids respect teachers who aren't a pushover. Who you are is irrelevant to that.
I know I don't necessarily NEED to be out, but I want to for a variety of reasons that I've mentioned previously in the thread.
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Get into Teaching
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm about to start my undergrad, and intend to do a PGCE (or PGDE as I might move to Scotland) following this. I'm a trans man, and I've been thinking I'd really like to be openly trans at work when I start teaching, but I'm worried about possible backlash potentially being too much?
Where in the UK is likely to be safest in this regard? I know it's a way off and things could change but with all the stuff going on at the moment I've been thinking about it lots.
And please don't come on here to be transphobic, I will just report you.
Hello,

I'm not sure if there are better or worse places or school geographically, but there are certainly better and worse schools, with the policies they have in place for challenging transphobia. You would benefit from exposure to school environments, to be able to spot those that are truly inclusive and looking to be anti-transphobic!

Please do register your interest in teaching, and we'll be able to help you with gaining an insight into how schools can support you and we can help you to prepare for your teacher training application. Register here!

Wishing you all the best in your degree!

Jane
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Compost
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A Physics teacher at my daughter's 11-18 school transitioned a few years ago. The head sent out a really well-considered letter to parents explaining what was happening and that the teacher would return after Christmas as a woman. There didn't seem to be any complaints, although it's a very multi-racial school and I thought some faiths might have an issue. My daughter said the first few months were a bit odd, and students struggled to remember to call her Miss but by the time my daughter took A level Physics everything seemed fine - my daughter was the only girl in the Physics group and they got on really well. I think if you arrive at a school having already transitioned it should be less of an issue.
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remussjhj01
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(Original post by Get into Teaching)
Hello,

I'm not sure if there are better or worse places or school geographically, but there are certainly better and worse schools, with the policies they have in place for challenging transphobia. You would benefit from exposure to school environments, to be able to spot those that are truly inclusive and looking to be anti-transphobic!

Please do register your interest in teaching, and we'll be able to help you with gaining an insight into how schools can support you and we can help you to prepare for your teacher training application. Register here!

Wishing you all the best in your degree!

Jane
Hi, thank you for replying.
I did do some work experience before lock down, but it was only at my old secondary school, as it was the only non-private one in the area (that didn't require public transport). However, I wasn't out do students during this time. Do you think it would be an idea to try being out next time I have the opportunity to do school experience.

(Original post by Compost)
A Physics teacher at my daughter's 11-18 school transitioned a few years ago. The head sent out a really well-considered letter to parents explaining what was happening and that the teacher would return after Christmas as a woman. There didn't seem to be any complaints, although it's a very multi-racial school and I thought some faiths might have an issue. My daughter said the first few months were a bit odd, and students struggled to remember to call her Miss but by the time my daughter took A level Physics everything seemed fine - my daughter was the only girl in the Physics group and they got on really well. I think if you arrive at a school having already transitioned it should be less of an issue.
That's really good to here. I will already have transitioned mostly by the time I start, so hopefully I won't have those issues. It's more a case of possible workplace discrimination, actual harassment from students (asking questions is fine, calling me a tr*nny is not) and possibly parents complaining (even though it would be illegal for them to fire me for this, it still wouldn't be great). I would assume the head wouldn't need to send out a letter if I'm entering already transitioned, which may help.
Other people have mentioned faith schools, and even though there aren't many secondary faith schools (from what I've seen), I think I'm going to aim to avoid them to be safe, as I know religious people can be very anti-trans.
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Get into Teaching
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(Original post by remussjhj01)
Hi, thank you for replying.
I did do some work experience before lock down, but it was only at my old secondary school, as it was the only non-private one in the area (that didn't require public transport). However, I wasn't out do students during this time. Do you think it would be an idea to try being out next time I have the opportunity to do school experience.
Dear remussjhj01

My pleasure.

I think while it's quite nice to go back to your old school, I think it more useful to see others that you are not already familiar with. Will you be in the same area once you are in University? If not, then we can guide you to schools that would welcome you.

I think that it would be a good idea to be your authentic self when doing the visits. If not, you'll never know what the reaction of staff or students would be.

If you do want our support, let me know once you've registered and send us a DM with your email address. I'll make sure you get the right adviser!

Take care!
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remussjhj01
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(Original post by Get into Teaching)
Dear remussjhj01

My pleasure.

I think while it's quite nice to go back to your old school, I think it more useful to see others that you are not already familiar with. Will you be in the same area once you are in University? If not, then we can guide you to schools that would welcome you.

I think that it would be a good idea to be your authentic self when doing the visits. If not, you'll never know what the reaction of staff or students would be.

If you do want our support, let me know once you've registered and send us a DM with your email address. I'll make sure you get the right adviser!

Take care!
I've just registered and am now waiting for the confirmation email.
I'm going to be in London for uni, and am considering staying in the area, so it would be good to get some experience at schools in London. I'll keep in mind to be out if I do get the chance to do more school experience.
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ByEeek
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(Original post by remussjhj01)
You do understand though that the reason most kids are homophobic/transphobic is because of societal homophobia and transphobia? And just because they are, doesn't mean it's okay and something I, or anyone else, should have to deal with.
Persistent harassment or assault of a teacher would likely get a student suspended or excluded anyway. I'm not going to try and 'cancel' anyone, but I'm also not going to allow children to be homophobic or transphobic to me, or any students.
Education is the best weapon against ignorance and bigotry.


I know I don't necessarily NEED to be out, but I want to for a variety of reasons that I've mentioned previously in the thread.
Go for it. There are a number of openly gay teachers in our school. I would say that 90% of kids are unaware, unbothered or supportive. And the 10% that might be hostile towards it are fully aware of just how savage the behaviour system would be against them if they were to say anything.
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MalcolmX
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if you taught at any of the schools i attended, you would probably end up like helen hopewell from waterloo road. the kids would bully you relentlessly.

if you go to a school with more civilised pupils, you should be fine though.
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