remussjhj01
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#41
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(Original post by ByEeek)
Go for it. There are a number of openly gay teachers in our school. I would say that 90% of kids are unaware, unbothered or supportive. And the 10% that might be hostile towards it are fully aware of just how savage the behaviour system would be against them if they were to say anything.
That's great, although there is generally more acceptance for LGB people than trans people, it's great that you've got some teachers who feel able to be open. I do agree though that hopefully the sanction system in place will be enough to keep most unaccepting student's mouths shut.

(Original post by MalcolmX)
if you taught at any of the schools i attended, you would probably end up like helen hopewell from waterloo road. the kids would bully you relentlessly.

if you go to a school with more civilised pupils, you should be fine though.
I'm doing my undergrad in London, and am considering staying for my PGCE and then to teach. Either that or Brighton area? Or Scotland, probably Edinburgh or Glasgow.
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ClaudiaVan
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#42
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(Original post by remussjhj01)
I'm doing my undergrad in London, and am considering staying for my PGCE and then to teach. Either that or Brighton area? Or Scotland, probably Edinburgh or Glasgow.
I did my PGCE just outside of Brighton: really accepting place!
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remussjhj01
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#43
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(Original post by ClaudiaVan)
I did my PGCE just outside of Brighton: really accepting place!
Was that at Sussex? I've been told really good things about the PGCE programme at Sussex.
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SarcAndSpark
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#44
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(Original post by remussjhj01)
That's great, although there is generally more acceptance for LGB people than trans people, it's great that you've got some teachers who feel able to be open. I do agree though that hopefully the sanction system in place will be enough to keep most unaccepting student's mouths shut.
Can I just push back against this a little bit?

I do agree that the issues that LGB and Trans people face are sometimes different, and I know this is sometimes true but I don't think in every environment there is less acceptance and I'm not sure it's necessarily a helpful thought to take into teaching. In general, I've found the kids who are likely to be transphobic are also the ones who are likely to be homophobic/sexist/racist etc as well. I think this isn't always true in other age groups, but with teenagers it tends to be (obviously there are exceptions).

I say this cautiously, but I'm not sure it's necessarily a good idea to assume that the discrimination you face will be worse than those in other marginalised groups? I think the schools where you'd have real issues would also not be accepting of (openly) LGB staff either. I think it's probably reasonably safe to assume that a school where LGB members of staff have good experiences would be a good school for you also.
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ClaudiaVan
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#45
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(Original post by remussjhj01)
Was that at Sussex? I've been told really good things about the PGCE programme at Sussex.
No it was at GMBC (Greater Brighton Meteopolitan College in Worthing which is a partner college from uni of Brighton I went to college there before uni. I did my PGCE in FE Art Design and Media with a theatre specialism). Sussex does a really great PGCE course too also secondary education look at Brighton
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remussjhj01
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(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
Can I just push back against this a little bit?

I do agree that the issues that LGB and Trans people face are sometimes different, and I know this is sometimes true but I don't think in every environment there is less acceptance and I'm not sure it's necessarily a helpful thought to take into teaching. In general, I've found the kids who are likely to be transphobic are also the ones who are likely to be homophobic/sexist/racist etc as well. I think this isn't always true in other age groups, but with teenagers it tends to be (obviously there are exceptions).

I say this cautiously, but I'm not sure it's necessarily a good idea to assume that the discrimination you face will be worse than those in other marginalised groups? I think the schools where you'd have real issues would also not be accepting of (openly) LGB staff either. I think it's probably reasonably safe to assume that a school where LGB members of staff have good experiences would be a good school for you also.
I totally get that obviously cis LGB people face issues, and whilst some are different, many are very similar. I'm bisexual too, so I'm not acting like it's not an issue, and I have had people say sh*t to me for being bi, but the brunt of it has been for being trans, and this is backed up by stats. Trans people are more likely to experience discrimination, including harassment from colleagues and customers than cis LGB people, and transphobia is much more normalised. Even among discussions about the banning of conversion therapy, there were calls for it only to be banned for cis LGB people, but to remain legal for trans people, despite the fact trans people are around 4x more likely to have it suggested to them than cis LGB people. Trans students are also more likely to be bullied at school and to receive negative conduct or comments from staff once they start uni.
I'm not saying cis LGB people don't face any issues anymore, of course they do, but generally, in the UK, transphobia is more normalised and accepted than homophobia. Hell, there was a transphobic group allowed to march in London Pride a couple years back. Of course it will vary depending on the place, but I've also found people can be very accepting of gay people, but extremely anti-trans (hence why you have transphobic gay people).
What I say is based on personal experience (how people treat me based on whether they know I'm bi, trans or both), and is backed up by statistics. I'm not saying what I've faced or am likely to face is worse than what others do (specifically cis LGB people), but at the very least, it's more common, which implies there is at least some level of social acceptance around it.

(Original post by ClaudiaVan)
No it was at GMBC (Greater Brighton Meteopolitan College in Worthing which is a partner college from uni of Brighton I went to college there before uni. I did my PGCE in FE Art Design and Media with a theatre specialism). Sussex does a really great PGCE course too also secondary education look at Brighton
Ahhh, I'll give them both a look!
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by remussjhj01)
I totally get that obviously cis LGB people face issues, and whilst some are different, many are very similar. I'm bisexual too, so I'm not acting like it's not an issue, and I have had people say sh*t to me for being bi, but the brunt of it has been for being trans, and this is backed up by stats. Trans people are more likely to experience discrimination, including harassment from colleagues and customers than cis LGB people, and transphobia is much more normalised. Even among discussions about the banning of conversion therapy, there were calls for it only to be banned for cis LGB people, but to remain legal for trans people, despite the fact trans people are around 4x more likely to have it suggested to them than cis LGB people. Trans students are also more likely to be bullied at school and to receive negative conduct or comments from staff once they start uni.
I'm not saying cis LGB people don't face any issues anymore, of course they do, but generally, in the UK, transphobia is more normalised and accepted than homophobia. Hell, there was a transphobic group allowed to march in London Pride a couple years back. Of course it will vary depending on the place, but I've also found people can be very accepting of gay people, but extremely anti-trans (hence why you have transphobic gay people).
What I say is based on personal experience (how people treat me based on whether they know I'm bi, trans or both), and is backed up by statistics. I'm not saying what I've faced or am likely to face is worse than what others do (specifically cis LGB people), but at the very least, it's more common, which implies there is at least some level of social acceptance around it.
Sorry, I think I phrased my post a little clumsily, and I apologise for that. I was talking specifically about the school environment, and really specifically about responses from children, really. All I meant to say that if a school has a couple of out LGB staff who say it is a good place for them to work, it's likely to be a good bet for you as well (I know this isn't guaranteed). Openly trans teachers are still pretty rare (although many schools will have openly trans students), so I just meant I wouldn't dismiss LGB staff having a good experience within a school as something that wasn't relevant to you?

It wasn't meant as a discussion of the wider societal issues around transphobia vs homophobia.
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remussjhj01
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(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
Sorry, I think I phrased my post a little clumsily, and I apologise for that. I was talking specifically about the school environment, and really specifically about responses from children, really. All I meant to say that if a school has a couple of out LGB staff who say it is a good place for them to work, it's likely to be a good bet for you as well (I know this isn't guaranteed). Openly trans teachers are still pretty rare (although many schools will have openly trans students), so I just meant I wouldn't dismiss LGB staff having a good experience within a school as something that wasn't relevant to you?

It wasn't meant as a discussion of the wider societal issues around transphobia vs homophobia.
Oh yeah, of course if there are some cis LGB staff who say it's a good place to work and they've not had many/any issues, I'll of course take that into account. What I meant was that just because that is the case, doesn't necessarily mean it would be for me, as transphobia is generally more acceptable and widespread, and the stats I gave were simply to back up my point.
I do agree though that it's likely that a place that is LGB friendly will also be trans friendly, and I wouldn't completely dismiss what cis LGB staff have to say, just take it with a grain of salt I guess.
Again though: I am not saying cis LGB people don't face issues. Obviously homophobia and biphobia are still very prevalent, especially in schools, but in my experience as a bisexual trans man, people have always seemed to have more of an issue with the trans part.
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by remussjhj01)
Oh yeah, of course if there are some cis LGB staff who say it's a good place to work and they've not had many/any issues, I'll of course take that into account. What I meant was that just because that is the case, doesn't necessarily mean it would be for me, as transphobia is generally more acceptable and widespread, and the stats I gave were simply to back up my point.
I do agree though that it's likely that a place that is LGB friendly will also be trans friendly, and I wouldn't completely dismiss what cis LGB staff have to say, just take it with a grain of salt I guess.
Again though: I am not saying cis LGB people don't face issues. Obviously homophobia and biphobia are still very prevalent, especially in schools, but in my experience as a bisexual trans man, people have always seemed to have more of an issue with the trans part.
No, I think that is true- but I think unfortunately there aren't that many out trans teachers, so it may be your only data point?
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