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Please share your acupuncture experiences with me:( watch

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    hey guys my mums taking me for an acupunture treatment(s) and i'm really scared. i went with her once when she had to get it done and i fainted as soon as the practitionner inserted the first needle behind her ears .
    my mum assured me theres nothing to be scared of and you don't even feel anything but you know how much lies come out of a mothers mouth:rolleyes:
    so please share your experiences with me whether its good or bad.
    thanks in advance:o:
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    (Original post by Natasha X)
    hey guys my mums taking me for an acupunture treatment(s) and i'm really scared. i went with her once when she had to get it done and i fainted as soon as the practitionner inserted the first needle behind her ears .
    my mum assured me theres nothing to be scared of and you don't even feel anything but you know how much lies come out of a mothers mouth:rolleyes:
    so please share your experiences with me whether its good or bad.
    thanks in advance:o:
    ok, i've had acupuncture on various occasions, both privately and on the NHS.
    My first experience with acupuncture there were absolutely no problems- i was having the acupuncture to try and relieve chronic headaches. While i could feel the needles going in it was more pressure i felt than pain, i was very relaxed during and it really seemed to make a difference. This was done privately and i had various sessions, all with no problems.

    the NHS acupuncture... this was done by a physiotherapist with the aim of relieving knotted muscles in my neck and shoulders. it was complete agony!! the guy was sticking the needles right into the knots of muscle and i was in so much pain all throughout. was apparently completely white afterwards and incredibly uncomfortable for the rest of the day. didn't go back for the followups.

    I think, no-one can really tell you how it will be for you. I'd be inclined to recommend you go for it as i had so many good experiences compared to the bad. It just made such a difference for me in terms of my headaches.

    Feel free to PM me with any specific questions! Good luck if you go ahead with it. probably the best advice i could give would relax- if you go in expecting it to be painful, all your muscles will be tense and that makes a huge difference!
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    What are you getting treated? Acupuncture doesn't actually work, all you'll feel is a placebo effect. Better to get some actual help/medicine.
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    I had accupuncture a few times done by an NHS Physiotherapist and it was absolutely fine. I had my concerns and doubts about it but when I had it done, all I felt during the treatment was a few little pinpricks which were barely even noticeable.

    Contrary to what Ramble says I did actually feel a hell of a lot better afterwards which wasn't a placebo. The MRI they took a few days after treatment showed that the inflamation around my shoulder (the area I was having trouble with) had actually gone down.

    I think everyone has their own experiences of accupuncture and it's highly worth having your own. Just go for it, it doesn't hurt to try.
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    (Original post by Ramble)
    What are you getting treated? Acupuncture doesn't actually work, all you'll feel is a placebo effect. Better to get some actual help/medicine.
    lots of research has been done into the efficacy of acupuncture, they wouldn't provide it on the NHS if there was no evidence of it being effective.
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    Both of my parents have been acupuncturists for 20 years+

    Naturally I've had a lot of treatments and understand a lot about it.

    PM me if you have any real questions about it.
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    (Original post by kate0904)
    the NHS acupuncture....
    thank god im not gonna be doing an NHS acupuncture :O thanks for your advice though i'll try to relax and let the rest happen

    (Original post by Ramble)
    What are you getting treated? Acupuncture doesn't actually work, all you'll feel is a placebo effect. Better to get some actual help/medicine.
    its for poor blood circulation which is causing a whole lots of problems:mad: trust me ive tried so many medications and ive seen so many doctors but none of that worked. however ive been given traditional chinese medicine and it will work if i acupuncture therapy with it.

    (Original post by Aeana)
    I think everyone has their own experiences of accupuncture and it's highly worth having your own. Just go for it, it doesn't hurt to try
    im glad it worked for u i think it'll be fine for me as well .... *sigh*
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    (Original post by Lampshade)
    Both of my parents have been acupuncturists for 20 years+

    Naturally I've had a lot of treatments and understand a lot about it.

    PM me if you have any real questions about it.
    :o: okay i will but i think i have needlephobia which is whats making it so freaky for me
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    (Original post by Natasha X)
    :o: okay i will but i think i have needlephobia which is whats making it so freaky for me
    i have a needlephobia: caused lots of problems when i was in hospital recently....
    the actual needles they use are tiny so tend not to be a problem iirc
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    I had acupuncture for a bad back and it worked a treat. It doesn't hurt at all and it cleared my back problems.
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    Not really what you're looking for, but my neighbour does acupuncture. He's one weird guy, but all sorts of people go to them i.e. one of my old teachers
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    (Original post by Ramble)
    What are you getting treated? Acupuncture doesn't actually work, all you'll feel is a placebo effect. Better to get some actual help/medicine.
    You're an idiot. Acupuncture treats the cause of the problem whilst western medicine only treats the symptoms.
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    i had accupunture on my shoulder through the NHS
    i was fine but felt uncomfortable if i moved but if i held still i couldnt even feel them

    my shoulder was aggritvated afterwards but the next day it felt much better

    although for me it was short lived and after 5 lots they decided it wasn't going to help me for more than a couple of days

    but i found the experience fine
    though my physio told me i had the strongest reaction he'ld ever seen as it went flaming red all around the needles, but i couldnt feel a thing lol

    my mums had it as well but privately and found it very helpful and really recommends it
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    (Original post by Lampshade)
    You're an idiot. Acupuncture treats the cause of the problem whilst western medicine only treats the symptoms.
    That statement is as idiotic as the one you're quoting.

    I've had acupuncture on my shoulder when it was really bad. It wasn't painful at the time, but I'm not sure it worked much - I was having other treatment at the same time so don't know which bit was actually effective (though none of it solved the problem completely).
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    That statement is as idiotic as the one you're quoting.
    Of course it is Helenia :rolleyes:

    Been indoctrinated by med school much?
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    That statement is as idiotic as the one you're quoting.
    What Western medicine tends to diagnose and treat is the effect that the disease state has on the body itself. The Practitioner of Oriental medicine diagnoses and acts upon the energy that creates the disease state.
    Source

    I would look for more sources, but it's H+R and thus won't.
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    Before you go, have a read through the Quackwatch Article on Acupuncture. It sets out the principles of acupuncture, discusses whether its effective, and the risks of being turned into a human pincushion.
    (Original post by Lampshade)
    What Western medicine tends to diagnose and treat is the effect that the disease state has on the body itself. The Practitioner of Oriental medicine diagnoses and acts upon the energy that creates the disease state.
    What evidence is there for this 'energy that creates the disease state'?
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    (Original post by YAP)

    What evidence is there for this 'energy that creates the disease state'?
    Oh, only about 5000 years worth of research by the chinese.

    Edit: The body gives off tell tale signs as to what the cause of the problem is - shown through the state of the tongue and the pulse specifically. Obviously the symptoms are also used for the diagnosis and the exact method of treatment.

    Yin is a good example of a particular "energy". For example a common ailment is Yin deficiency. Symptoms - migraines/headaches, night sweats, lack of concentration, premature ejaculation, anxiety etc etc.

    Yin deficiency can be treated successfully with acupuncture and dietry changes - After this treatment the symptoms are normally gone or reduced. The tell tale signs from the pulse and tongue will not be so apparent.

    ...and none of the side effects of taking pharmaceuticals.
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    My mum's an acupuncturist and it certainly relieved some pain whilst I was recovering from my broken arm. Placebo effect or not, it worked, and thats all I care about.

    Don't get it done in those high street stores though. They're not particularly great.
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    (Original post by Lampshade)
    Oh, only about 5000 years worth of research by the chinese.
    I suppose you also believe that tiger penis soup aids virility then?

    (Original post by Lampshade)
    Edit: The body gives off tell tale signs as to what the cause of the problem is - shown through the state of the tongue and the pulse specifically. Obviously the symptoms are also used for the diagnosis and the exact method of treatment.
    Yes, western medicine does this too, only it looks at a lot more symptoms/signs and is able to accurately distinguish different conditons from them.

    (Original post by Lampshade)
    Yin is a good example of a particular "energy". For example a common ailment is Yin deficiency. Symptoms - migraines/headaches, night sweats, lack of concentration, premature ejaculation, anxiety etc etc.
    Oh god, this infamous "energy" rears its ugly head again. I wish these ancient insane therapies would stop hijacking science terms. This reminds me when our awesome physics a-level teacher said he'd seen "tachyon therapy" advertised in town, yeah therapy involving imaginary particles that go back in time to cure aches.

    (Original post by Lampshade)
    Yin deficiency can be treated successfully with acupuncture and dietry changes - After this treatment the symptoms are normally gone or reduced. The tell tale signs from the pulse and tongue will not be so apparent.
    Oh so whilst your leg may still have massive amounts of oedematous swelling and your feet are rotting with gas gangrene as long as your pulse rate is normal and your tongue looks ok you're fine?

    (Original post by Lampshade)
    ...and none of the side effects of taking pharmaceuticals.
    None of the benefits too.

    There is no fundamental difference between "western" medicine and "alternative" therapy other than that "western" medicine has evidence to back it up. Better terms to use for "western" and "alternative" would be "evidence-based" and "baseless".

    The NHS only provides acupuncture because it has been bullied into it by nutters, the people who give this treatment have no medical knowledge other than these "ancient techniques", it's like getting a stone-age flint knapper to repair a jet engine.

    Give me a break.
 
 
 
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