Is law the most overrated university subject and career path?

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Frogeyes
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3 years of law have elucidated everything for me, and I am not even bitter since I had a decent honours from a decent RG university:

First of all, laws aren't even made by lawyers. Those who make laws need not, and usually do not, have a law degree or profound knowledge in law.
So you are basically studying something that is not even made by lawyers/people who have studied law. And you view it as a seemingly "exclusive" profession.

Secondly, laws change all the time, what you have learnt in this year may have to be erased/modified to make way for new laws next year. Don't even get me started on case law. It's simply chaos and uncertainty shrouded in a veneer of "tradition".

Thirdly, laws differ even within a single country, let alone overseas common law jurisdictions, and let alone non-common law jurisdictions. Meanwhile most sciences are universal, and even business studies do generally work universally.

Fourthly, the UK justice system is a joke. Most judges probably had a sentence in mind BEFORE the trial even began. And laws have to make way for the social status / perceived worth of the defendant.

Fifthly, the legal profession probably does not depend on academic ability as much as the other aspects of a prospective candidate, such as connections and social status/background. 80-something% of lawyers say their work is boring and not challenging in the slightest. Surely judging a candidate mostly on their academic merit would be pointless?

What else?
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Frogeyes
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Not to mention, being a lawyer has very little beneficial impact on the society, apart from few and rare examples of criminal justice being administered, and some instances of human rights being upheld
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chloenix
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I agree to an extent, although I'm not a law student yet so I don't know much!
But I would argue that this is what makes law interesting. If it was a stagnant concept of untouchable individual laws, it would be boring to study and practice. But, no, law is a living, breathing concept, which constantly changes and differs in each jurisdiction.
And regarding the legal profession itself and the people who say it's boring: every job is disliked by some and enjoyed by others. I know a lot of people who studied law just for the money and had absolutely no interest in the study itself, so it's no wonder that so many lawyers are bored.
And I disagree about lawyer having little impact on society. Without lawyers, our society would fall apart. Whilst each small individual case might not seem so impactful, the profession of being a lawyer is incredibly beneficial to society, since everyone has a right to legal representation.
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(Original post by chloenix)
I agree to an extent, although I'm not a law student yet so I don't know much!
But I would argue that this is what makes law interesting. If it was a stagnant concept of untouchable individual laws, it would be boring to study and practice. But, no, law is a living, breathing concept, which constantly changes and differs in each jurisdiction.
And regarding the legal profession itself and the people who say it's boring: every job is disliked by some and enjoyed by others. I know a lot of people who studied law just for the money and had absolutely no interest in the study itself, so it's no wonder that so many lawyers are bored.
And I disagree about lawyer having little impact on society. Without lawyers, our society would fall apart. Whilst each small individual case might not seem so impactful, the profession of being a lawyer is incredibly beneficial to society, since everyone has a right to legal representation.
Certainly the society needs legal representation, but whether justice is actually served in UK even by legal standards is rather dubious. People deserving of life imprisonment get out after, say, 4-7 years and go on a killing spree again, while victims of accidents got sued by the perpetrators and lost their case! With this taken into consideration, the legal profession is really as offensive as, say, being a coroner or a trash collector, all being (dirty) jobs that someone simply has to do.

I actually enjoy legal theory far more than practical law. There is room for discussion in legal theory, but law students HAVE to take laws for granted in practical areas of law. Not to mention lawyers spend most of their time not on arguing the law but on doing and filing paperwork... they don't show this to you in legal drama do they

Looking at laws (statutes) is by no means an interesting exercise, coming from a law student.
Just take a glimpse at this statute and see for yourself:
https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1979/54
Does it seem inspiring and interesting to you? Is it living and breathing? Probably the stark opposite! Imagine having to go through the entirety Sale of Goods Act, plus reading hundreds of judgments on the Act, just for it to possibly change next year?
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chloenix
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(Original post by Frogeyes)
Certainly the society needs legal representation, but whether justice is actually served in UK even by legal standards is rather dubious. People deserving of life imprisonment get out after, say, 4-7 years and go on a killing spree again, while victims of accidents got sued by the perpetrators and lost their case! With this taken into consideration, the legal profession is really as offensive as, say, being a coroner or a trash collector, all being (dirty) jobs that someone simply has to do.

I actually enjoy legal theory far more than practical law. There is room for discussion in legal theory, but law students HAVE to take laws for granted in practical areas of law. Not to mention lawyers spend most of their time not on arguing the law but on doing and filing paperwork... they don't show this to you in legal drama do they

Looking at laws (statutes) is by no means an interesting exercise, coming from a law student.
Just take a glimpse at this statute and see for yourself:
https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1979/54
Does it seem inspiring and interesting to you? Is it living and breathing? Probably the stark opposite! Imagine having to go through the entirety Sale of Goods Act, plus reading hundreds of judgments on the Act, just for it to possibly change next year?
That's a good point! I'm not saying that the legal profession promotes a lot of good. For example doctors do good everyday, every life they save is valuable. Whereas for lawyers, sometimes you defend an innocent person who has been wronged (and you do good) and sometimes you defend a guilty person who has done wrong (and you do bad). I think it's definitely a balance. But that doesn't mean it's not necessary! Ironically I would say that being a trash collector probably does more good to society as a whole than being a lawyer, since you never do any 'bad'. I don't know if this makes sense, it's just my little philosophical theory.
That being said, most jobs don't do good either. Being an IT technician or a delivery driver, most mundane jobs don't really help save the planet or change the system. It's just a matter of doing a job that has to be done.

Yes the paperwork does seem overwhelming! My uncle used to be a lawyer and he would stay up until 5am some days just filling in documents! But there are downsides to every job. Teachers have to do a sh*t-ton of paperwork, so do social workers and every other profession under the sun. Arguably, lawyers have to do more, but I think that would be hard to measure since very few people have worked enough professions to compare!

And yes, I agree! Going through laws isn't the most fun thing in the world. I've started to look through a few, and it can be excruciatingly painful at times. But there are also interesting laws, the ones that shape our day to day life. Looking through the Abortion Laws, for example, was so fascinating to me!

Also, if you dislike studying law and practicing it...why did you do a law degree? You don't seem to enjoy it at all, which is sad Wouldn't you consider entering a non-law related profession? A law degree opens a lot of doors (or so they say), so why would you want to dedicate the rest of your life to something you clearly don't enjoy!
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DrD_1598
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You say you've studied law but don't seem to understand anything about law or the profession or how it operates in society and the role it plays. You seem largely to think that justice only occurs, or doesn't occur, in crime but law is much wider than that. You are right to an extent though, law is a job and it's not rocket science.
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(Original post by DrD_1598)
You say you've studied law but don't seem to understand anything about law or the profession or how it operates in society and the role it plays. You seem largely to think that justice only occurs, or doesn't occur, in crime but law is much wider than that. You are right to an extent though, law is a job and it's not rocket science.
i agree... this OP seems to be trying to undermine our legal system... on behalf of a hostile power ? :holmes:
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Frogeyes
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(Original post by chloenix)
That's a good point! I'm not saying that the legal profession promotes a lot of good. For example doctors do good everyday, every life they save is valuable. Whereas for lawyers, sometimes you defend an innocent person who has been wronged (and you do good) and sometimes you defend a guilty person who has done wrong (and you do bad). I think it's definitely a balance. But that doesn't mean it's not necessary! Ironically I would say that being a trash collector probably does more good to society as a whole than being a lawyer, since you never do any 'bad'. I don't know if this makes sense, it's just my little philosophical theory.
That being said, most jobs don't do good either. Being an IT technician or a delivery driver, most mundane jobs don't really help save the planet or change the system. It's just a matter of doing a job that has to be done.

Yes the paperwork does seem overwhelming! My uncle used to be a lawyer and he would stay up until 5am some days just filling in documents! But there are downsides to every job. Teachers have to do a sh*t-ton of paperwork, so do social workers and every other profession under the sun. Arguably, lawyers have to do more, but I think that would be hard to measure since very few people have worked enough professions to compare!

And yes, I agree! Going through laws isn't the most fun thing in the world. I've started to look through a few, and it can be excruciatingly painful at times. But there are also interesting laws, the ones that shape our day to day life. Looking through the Abortion Laws, for example, was so fascinating to me!

Also, if you dislike studying law and practicing it...why did you do a law degree? You don't seem to enjoy it at all, which is sad Wouldn't you consider entering a non-law related profession? A law degree opens a lot of doors (or so they say), so why would you want to dedicate the rest of your life to something you clearly don't enjoy!
Yes, the adversarial legal system means there is a balance of power on both sides... on paper. The law tends to serve the rich and socially significant people better no matter which side of the court they are on!
The defendant is "too bright" to go to prison for stabbing her boyfriend: Not even the judge cares about the law!
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/201...jail-stabbing/

Yes, many jobs don't do good to society. But adorning such a, as you have said, potentially offensive profession that is law with such prestige (far above trash collectors) is the problem here. People who have talent in, say, Biology, who could possibly one day invent a cure to previously incurable diseases, might end up choosing Law over Biology because Law sounds more prestigious to him, and that is a huge loss to the society

Law is far from the only profession requiring paperwork, but for a subject that is already boring at university level, coupled with the extreme stress that is probably not seen in teachers, it is a recipe for disaster all along don't you think?

I actually found a few law modules interesting, but looking at statutes of those subjects is probably the least interesting part thereof... really! The case law is probably what you are looking for.

I do regret studying law even as the humanities-nerd that I am, not that I did not get A's in science subjects. Also, the paths available to humanities students tend to also be available to.. science students! But not the vice versa! In this aspect, law is even more contentious, as people from any degree subject can convert to law in 1 year's time.
As for humanities students converting to science subjects, you'll probably have to retake A-levels if you did not already choose science subjects AND start over again from scratch all 4-5 years of a science degree.
That is simply unfair
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chloenix
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(Original post by Frogeyes)
Yes, the adversarial legal system means there is a balance of power on both sides... on paper. The law tends to serve the rich and socially significant people better no matter which side of the court they are on!
The defendant is "too bright" to go to prison for stabbing her boyfriend: Not even the judge cares about the law!
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/201...jail-stabbing/

Yes, many jobs don't do good to society. But adorning such a, as you have said, potentially offensive profession that is law with such prestige (far above trash collectors) is the problem here. People who have talent in, say, Biology, who could possibly one day invent a cure to previously incurable diseases, might end up choosing Law over Biology because Law sounds more prestigious to him, and that is a huge loss to the society

Law is far from the only profession requiring paperwork, but for a subject that is already boring at university level, coupled with the extreme stress that is probably not seen in teachers, it is a recipe for disaster all along don't you think?

I actually found a few law modules interesting, but looking at statutes of those subjects is probably the least interesting part thereof... really! The case law is probably what you are looking for.

I do regret studying law even as the humanities-nerd that I am, not that I did not get A's in science subjects. Also, the paths available to humanities students tend to also be available to.. science students! But not the vice versa! In this aspect, law is even more contentious, as people from any degree subject can convert to law in 1 year's time.
As for humanities students converting to science subjects, you'll probably have to retake A-levels if you did not already choose science subjects AND start over again from scratch all 4-5 years of a science degree.
That is simply unfair
Yes the legal system has corruption. So does politics, the army and every other aspect of our society. Favouring the rich and the intelligent and the powerful is a pattern one can observe everywhere around if one look's hard enough. But as a law student/lawyer, you have more power than the average person to change that. You can actively make good choices or work your way up to being a judge and serve primary justice. As a lawyer, you are one of the main components in facilitating the serving of justice. I think sometimes lawyers do have to put their morals aside and represent the guilty, but I don't believe that there is such thing as an inherently bad person, just someone who has been tainted by life experiences and has a twisted perception of morality as a result. These people are also victims in a sense, and they deserve someone to argue their case. Even if you deem the profession to be 'bad', there is still a lot you can do to actively move away from that.

Also, it seems as though your aim in life is to do 'good'? Am I right? If so, choosing law probably wasn't the best decision because, from your perspective, it is not a good profession. Choosing to pursue law seems like a misjudgement on your behalf, but it's not too late. Evidently, you probably won't be able to go down the science route unless you are prepared to start from scratch (although you might want to look into that, I have never enjoyed science so I have no idea), but there are millions of other professions you could go into! Studying law does not mean you have to be a lawyer. You could study a masters in another subject. You could go into media and journalism and broadcast news to help people. You could work for a charity to bring justice to the destitute and unfortunate. You could work in pretty much any job that doesn't require any knowledge from other degrees. You should look into other jobs and see what they require. Or take a gap year to teach English abroad.
Basically my point is that you don't have to work in the legal profession, and doing so would not really make sense since you hate it so much and you don't want to work for 60 years in a job you despise.
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Frogeyes
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(Original post by chloenix)
Yes the legal system has corruption. So does politics, the army and every other aspect of our society. Favouring the rich and the intelligent and the powerful is a pattern one can observe everywhere around if one look's hard enough. But as a law student/lawyer, you have more power than the average person to change that. You can actively make good choices or work your way up to being a judge and serve primary justice. As a lawyer, you are one of the main components in facilitating the serving of justice. I think sometimes lawyers do have to put their morals aside and represent the guilty, but I don't believe that there is such thing as an inherently bad person, just someone who has been tainted by life experiences and has a twisted perception of morality as a result. These people are also victims in a sense, and they deserve someone to argue their case. Even if you deem the profession to be 'bad', there is still a lot you can do to actively move away from that.

Also, it seems as though your aim in life is to do 'good'? Am I right? If so, choosing law probably wasn't the best decision because, from your perspective, it is not a good profession. Choosing to pursue law seems like a misjudgement on your behalf, but it's not too late. Evidently, you probably won't be able to go down the science route unless you are prepared to start from scratch (although you might want to look into that, I have never enjoyed science so I have no idea), but there are millions of other professions you could go into! Studying law does not mean you have to be a lawyer. You could study a masters in another subject. You could go into media and journalism and broadcast news to help people. You could work for a charity to bring justice to the destitute and unfortunate. You could work in pretty much any job that doesn't require any knowledge from other degrees. You should look into other jobs and see what they require. Or take a gap year to teach English abroad.
Basically my point is that you don't have to work in the legal profession, and doing so would not really make sense since you hate it so much and you don't want to work for 60 years in a job you despise.
I agree, there is corruption everywhere, but in the UK it appears that it is just how the law works even without corruption in its strict sense.

I am looking at alternative paths including e.g. a masters in another subject. What would you suggest be a good fit for a humanities-nerd? I have things like history and archaeology in mind but they require previous undergraduate study in the respective areas. Not to mention the value they add to my job prospects / breadth is negligible.

Let's say you study law and, at the completion of your degree, are overwhelmed with the same disappointment as I am having now. What would you see as a viable change in career given science is practically out for both of us? I am very interested to know!
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chloenix
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(Original post by Frogeyes)
I agree, there is corruption everywhere, but in the UK it appears that it is just how the law works even without corruption in its strict sense.

I am looking at alternative paths including e.g. a masters in another subject. What would you suggest be a good fit for a humanities-nerd? I have things like history and archaeology in mind but they require previous undergraduate study in the respective areas. Not to mention the value they add to my job prospects / breadth is negligible.

Let's say you study law and, at the completion of your degree, are overwhelmed with the same disappointment as I am having now. What would you see as a viable change in career given science is practically out for both of us? I am very interested to know!
I'm not in university yet so I'm afraid to say that I don't know much about how Masters work! However, I am sure that there are hundreds of humanities masters that you could study, despite having studied law at undergrad. I think you should ask on a separate TSR forum to people who have more knowledge regarding this topic! You could also look through different universities and see what courses they offer and what their requirements are. History and archeology sound very interesting! Are you sure that every university requires previous undergrad study for those masters? Surely there's the odd university that doesn't?
How about business? Surely law and business have many similarities and you could therefore study it as a Masters without the undergrad? Business would undoubtedly open a lot of doors for you.

Also perhaps you could consider studying abroad somewhere. I know that in France you can study a Masters in journalism with Law degree, and a lot of their masters are in English. Also, I disagree, I think that studying a Masters in a different subject would be very valuable to future job prospects given that you don't want to work in the legal profession. It will expand your breadth of knowledge which is certainly attractive to employers.

And to answer your question, I've actually thought about this a lot. I'm planning on studying law but I'm worried that after finishing the degree I'll come to dislike the profession, like you. But luckily, a law degree opens a lot of doors to jobs I would also love to work in. For example I've always wanted to be a reporter/journalist. I've also wanted to work as a Personal Assistant in a company that I like and gradually work my way up as I make connections. And founding and making my own business is something that interests me too (for which law is very useful). Law does not close doors! There are so many more things you can do with it! Trust me.
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Frogeyes
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(Original post by chloenix)
I'm not in university yet so I'm afraid to say that I don't know much about how Masters work! However, I am sure that there are hundreds of humanities masters that you could study, despite having studied law at undergrad. I think you should ask on a separate TSR forum to people who have more knowledge regarding this topic! You could also look through different universities and see what courses they offer and what their requirements are. History and archeology sound very interesting! Are you sure that every university requires previous undergrad study for those masters? Surely there's the odd university that doesn't?
How about business? Surely law and business have many similarities and you could therefore study it as a Masters without the undergrad? Business would undoubtedly open a lot of doors for you.

Also perhaps you could consider studying abroad somewhere. I know that in France you can study a Masters in journalism with Law degree, and a lot of their masters are in English. Also, I disagree, I think that studying a Masters in a different subject would be very valuable to future job prospects given that you don't want to work in the legal profession. It will expand your breadth of knowledge which is certainly attractive to employers.

And to answer your question, I've actually thought about this a lot. I'm planning on studying law but I'm worried that after finishing the degree I'll come to dislike the profession, like you. But luckily, a law degree opens a lot of doors to jobs I would also love to work in. For example I've always wanted to be a reporter/journalist. I've also wanted to work as a Personal Assistant in a company that I like and gradually work my way up as I make connections. And founding and making my own business is something that interests me too (for which law is very useful). Law does not close doors! There are so many more things you can do with it! Trust me.
Well, I have never thought of studying elsewhere. But in terms of prestige and employer reputation I think UK universities (the ones I got into and want to get into anyway) are second only to a few US universities.

I see you are already vouching for law before actually studying it or working on it. Perhaps not so different from what I did before I started my law degree!

Law is also a discriminatory profession if you haven't already known, so many misogynistic comments as well as other forms of discrimination of course. That's the final nail in the coffin for me. But I am glad you already have such flexible thinking at such an early stage. From your goals it does seem like law is a decent choice for you!
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chloenix
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(Original post by Frogeyes)
Well, I have never thought of studying elsewhere. But in terms of prestige and employer reputation I think UK universities (the ones I got into and want to get into anyway) are second only to a few US universities.

I see you are already vouching for law before actually studying it or working on it. Perhaps not so different from what I did before I started my law degree!

Law is also a discriminatory profession if you haven't already known, so many misogynistic comments as well as other forms of discrimination of course. That's the final nail in the coffin for me. But I am glad you already have such flexible thinking at such an early stage. From your goals it does seem like law is a decent choice for you!
Yes it is true that European universities are less prestigious than UK ones, so if that matters to you, maybe not! But if you can't find any masters in the UK it could be an option perhaps.

And yes maybe I am quite similar to you! It really annoys me that schools/unis don't give a better insight into what a law degree entails. Law students are essentially blindly walking into a degree not knowing what to expect whereas other students know exactly. I do hope I have a better experience than you because I definitely understand how law could be uninteresting at times! May I ask what university you went to.

I hope you find something that you love to do and I'm sure you will!
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vicvic38
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(Original post by Frogeyes)
3 years of law have elucidated everything for me, and I am not even bitter since I had a decent honours from a decent RG university:

First of all, laws aren't even made by lawyers. Those who make laws need not, and usually do not, have a law degree or profound knowledge in law.
So you are basically studying something that is not even made by lawyers/people who have studied law. And you view it as a seemingly "exclusive" profession.

Secondly, laws change all the time, what you have learnt in this year may have to be erased/modified to make way for new laws next year. Don't even get me started on case law. It's simply chaos and uncertainty shrouded in a veneer of "tradition".

Thirdly, laws differ even within a single country, let alone overseas common law jurisdictions, and let alone non-common law jurisdictions. Meanwhile most sciences are universal, and even business studies do generally work universally.

Fourthly, the UK justice system is a joke. Most judges probably had a sentence in mind BEFORE the trial even began. And laws have to make way for the social status / perceived worth of the defendant.

Fifthly, the legal profession probably does not depend on academic ability as much as the other aspects of a prospective candidate, such as connections and social status/background. 80-something% of lawyers say their work is boring and not challenging in the slightest. Surely judging a candidate mostly on their academic merit would be pointless?

What else?
So you did 3 years of UG law and think that you should have learned all the laws and be prepared to go to court?

A law degree is more of a jurisprudence exercise. It teaches you to think about the law and the reasons things are set up the way they are. Someone obviously isn't planning to take the bar.

Did you actually study law? I feel like you'd have worked these out yourself by now...
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(Original post by vicvic38)
So you did 3 years of UG law and think that you should have learned all the laws and be prepared to go to court?

A law degree is more of a jurisprudence exercise. It teaches you to think about the law and the reasons things are set up the way they are. Someone obviously isn't planning to take the bar.

Did you actually study law? I feel like you'd have worked these out yourself by now...
I would rather not learn all the laws at UG, look I am not interested in practical law.

No, most law modules apart from Jurisprudence barely touch upon the reasons behind laws... the most you'll discuss is judgments themselves and the reasoning of judges. Never why the laws are the way they are. Those belong to lawmakers, politicians, and law draftsmen. Not lawyers.

All you have to do is familiarize yourself with statutes and memorize cases, occasionally comment on judgments, in other words, you take the law for granted, no space for wannabe parliamentary debates.
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(Original post by chloenix)
Yes it is true that European universities are less prestigious than UK ones, so if that matters to you, maybe not! But if you can't find any masters in the UK it could be an option perhaps.

And yes maybe I am quite similar to you! It really annoys me that schools/unis don't give a better insight into what a law degree entails. Law students are essentially blindly walking into a degree not knowing what to expect whereas other students know exactly. I do hope I have a better experience than you because I definitely understand how law could be uninteresting at times! May I ask what university you went to.

I hope you find something that you love to do and I'm sure you will!
It's top 10 in Law in the UK according to QS... don't wanna be exposing myself.
Meanwhile I am more interested in knowing what universities you are applying to considering your initially very positive outlook on this subject and profession 😉

Thank you by the way
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(Original post by Frogeyes)
It's top 10 in Law in the UK according to QS... don't wanna be exposing myself.
Meanwhile I am more interested in knowing what universities you are applying to considering your initially very positive outlook on this subject and profession 😉

Thank you by the way
Haha no worries sorry for being intrusive!
And I'm looking at UCL, KCL, LSE (yes I love London!), possibly Exeter and I was considering Oxford but I'm really starting to doubt that since I don't think I have the extreme interest and research under my belt that Oxford requires! Any opinions on these from your experience?
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(Original post by chloenix)
Haha no worries sorry for being intrusive!
And I'm looking at UCL, KCL, LSE (yes I love London!), possibly Exeter and I was considering Oxford but I'm really starting to doubt that since I don't think I have the extreme interest and research under my belt that Oxford requires! Any opinions on these from your experience?
Well Exeter is the odd one out. Posh like the others but nothing exceptional. Not even sure if it is good for law (or anything) at all. All I heard about it was posh kids bullying a state school girl into suicide. Could be your insurance choice tho
You must be very confident of your A-Level and LNAT results since your selection allows for virtually no misses.
If you are effortlessly and regularly top at school these should not be a problem 😁
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Yea, law is hard work and very underpaid, escorts and strippers earn more money

(Original post by Frogeyes)
3 years of law have elucidated everything for me, and I am not even bitter since I had a decent honours from a decent RG university:

First of all, laws aren't even made by lawyers. Those who make laws need not, and usually do not, have a law degree or profound knowledge in law.
So you are basically studying something that is not even made by lawyers/people who have studied law. And you view it as a seemingly "exclusive" profession.

Secondly, laws change all the time, what you have learnt in this year may have to be erased/modified to make way for new laws next year. Don't even get me started on case law. It's simply chaos and uncertainty shrouded in a veneer of "tradition".

Thirdly, laws differ even within a single country, let alone overseas common law jurisdictions, and let alone non-common law jurisdictions. Meanwhile most sciences are universal, and even business studies do generally work universally.

Fourthly, the UK justice system is a joke. Most judges probably had a sentence in mind BEFORE the trial even began. And laws have to make way for the social status / perceived worth of the defendant.

Fifthly, the legal profession probably does not depend on academic ability as much as the other aspects of a prospective candidate, such as connections and social status/background. 80-something% of lawyers say their work is boring and not challenging in the slightest. Surely judging a candidate mostly on their academic merit would be pointless?

What else?
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#20
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#20
(Original post by Frogeyes)
Well Exeter is the odd one out. Posh like the others but nothing exceptional. Not even sure if it is good for law (or anything) at all. All I heard about it was posh kids bullying a state school girl into suicide. Could be your insurance choice tho
You must be very confident of your A-Level and LNAT results since your selection allows for virtually no misses.
If you are effortlessly and regularly top at school these should not be a problem 😁
Thanks for telling me about Exeter! I've heard about the extreme posh-ness too, which is a bit of an off-put for me, so I think it is definitely my last choice
And I am fairly confident I think. I mean it's the summer holidays and I'm revising for like 7 hours a day in my subjects and for the LNAT. I'm really hoping for A*s and As but then again you never know, I could always fluke it. And yeah I'm trying to come up with an 'insurance' with lower required grades but I'm not sure because except for the unis I've listed, none other appeal to me in the slightest! Any suggestions? I'm also hoping to apply abroad in France and Amsterdam which have MUCH lower entry requirements so those could be insurances I guess.
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