Why do you NOT believe in a God? Watch

Agent Smith
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Fairly obvious companion thread here

To all those who consider themselves somewhere below 4 on the Dawkins Scale (ie who hold God's existence to be improbable or worse): Why do you not believe?

Personally, my reasons include: The unsolved Problems of Evil and Hell; the good old Euthyphro Dilemma of the origin of morality (similarly unsolved); the slightly subtler argument that God's existence doesn't appear to have made much difference to the Universe (upon which I will happily expand if asked); and the fact that in the absence of proof of a proposition, I find it more logical to view that proposition as false (in other words, the "burden of proof" idea).
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lidskoo
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Science.
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GregoryJL
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The answers Theism offers seem always possible but never plausible, by my lights. This applies to the majority of problems in Philosophy, from the ePoE to the mind-body problem.
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what_apples
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I have found nothing to suggest that a god exists other than some books written by some (admittedly shrewd) people hundreds/thousands of years ago (or more recently, even; Scientology, for example) and a feeling of insecurity in people's lives whereby believing in a protective higher power is often the only comfort they can find.

So really, for me at least, the real question is why should I believe in god just because someone else tells me its true and there is no evidence for it?
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Cities
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All the reasoning in relation to God [as well as the theodicies + counterarguments to common problems] appears to be so convoluted and labyrinthine that it never seems to make any sense. In science, the theories must fit the facts, otherwise they're discarded and if they're controversial, they're ubiquitously derided. But in religion, it seems as if the facts are used to fit the theories. And no matter how controversial a certain religious issue is, if it has some religious backing from scripture, the Pope etc., it somehow has a lot more credence. I find it very difficult to express exactly why I'm convinced that God doesn't exist, but it's mainly because it seems to constantly violate logic and overall, doesn't make sense to me.
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Varsity
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In addition to what the OP said…

To be a god you must wield great power, and be practically infallible, because even if you make a mistake you have the power to change it.

Clearly the human race is a flawed creation, we are selfish in the extreme and often violent to each other and the world around us. The fact god has not fixed us is a clear sign god does not exist.
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Elvendork
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GeoTom
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Just because it is a bit silly and unnecessary tbh.
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clank
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incredibly unlikely as there is no scientific evidence to prove gods existence. i dont need proof that there isnt...i believe what is front of me, facts, emotions, people, behaviour...whatever.

the reason im not religious in general


religion has no impact on my life, i feel no need for 'something else'
religion is so contradictory, why would i base my life on something that would force me to be constantly hippocritical??
it is the reason behind so much conflict (or the excuse for it)
it breeds so much intollerence and hatred outweighing any good impact
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shuvle
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Science.
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Audrey Hepburn
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Same reason that I don't believe in unicorns, cos it's stupid.
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abu.10
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(Original post by lidskoo)
Science.
there is apparently some evidence from your "science" which proves that scientology exists...
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Agent Smith
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(Original post by Varsity)
In addition to what the OP said…

To be a god you must wield great power, and be practically infallible, because even if you make a mistake you have the power to change it.

Clearly the human race is a flawed creation, we are selfish in the extreme and often violent to each other and the world around us. The fact god has not fixed us is a clear sign god does not exist.
Just to pre-empt the various responses to this, eg chiefly the Free Will Defence: I don't buy them, either. They don't stand up logically.
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LukeatForest
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I understand why people don't believe in God, but don't you think that the definition of God is too broad and by its very nature it tends to confuse people into not believing? For instance, the Bible will tell you that there was nothing and then God decided to make everything in seven days. Back in the day such an event was placed in very recent history but has obviously been proven as false. However, if you ignore such Biblical hyperbole, is it not possible that something created the Universe based on scientific principles, where life is just a by-product?

Is it so innocent to believe that maybe science is God's creation, as opposed to sunshine, lollipops and that worst of things - humankind? Now I'm not claiming that this is the case, it's just a point for examination. Let's not forget that the ideas of God currently held as possible by religions were designed by men, based on absolutely nothing bar the claims of one or two individuals (Jesus and Mohammad). I don't see why such maniacal ideas should be held against the believers forever just because Science has progressed far enough to discount much of the fiction that has been written.

As yet, Science has progressed nowhere near enough to egotistically claim that it has disproved the existence of God. Nor shall it ever. I find it difficult to think that anybody would be closed entirely to the idea of God even if they are an atheist. I personally do believe in God but I don't claim that God is anything special. I simply have explored my own mind and feelings and come to what I perceive as a logical conclusion - that some force or being did somehow inspire the growth or creation of the Universe. I don't think there's a way that such a Philosophy can ever be deconstructed either.
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clank
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just because we cant yet create dna in the given conditions doesn't mean it was brought here by an alien from another plannet
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Agent Smith
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(Original post by GregoryJL)
The answers Theism offers seem always possible but never plausible, by my lights. This applies to the majority of problems in Philosophy, from the ePoE to the mind-body problem.
That's a good point. Implausibility, on its own, wouldn't be so bad; after all, a lot of modern science, particularly quantum theory, seems implausible at first glance, and even when we learn a bit more and discover the evidence is wildly, overwhelmingly in its favour it still feels weird and wrong because of how our brains evolved. But the combination of implausibility and unfalsifiability is a fatal one.

Incidentally I note with amusement that "by x's lights" is a favourite turn of phrase of one Richard Dawkins
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Shortarse
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Scientific explanations make it unlikely in my view that there is any kind of god. I'm quite happy to believe that everything has come about by chance with no help from a higher being, and that people don't really have a reason to exist, we just do because that's how the planet has evolved. While I respect people who can have faith in something with no evidence to support it in certain circumstances, I can rarely do the same.
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redluc
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Mainly due to the riddle of Epicurus. I am yet to find someone give me a sufficiently persuasive argument for why god let the holocaust happen.
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Good bloke
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Fundamentally, all arguments in favour of the need for a superior creator seem to me to be circular and self-serving. OK, the origin of the universe is a great unknown, but saying that a god created it all is no help because, by that logic, something must have created the god as well and we end up no nearer the ultimate answer.
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jennyng2000
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its illogical
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