zoe82003
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 10 months ago
#1
Hey, so, I'm catching up on lockdown stuff and I was wondering if there can be schemas inside of schemas. So, like, if there is a big schema, e.g. children thinking that 4 legged animals are dogs but only seeing small dogs than they see a bigger dog, will that size thing go into another schema inside 4 legs=dog schema but be a small and big dogs exist schema in that? Sorry if that doesn't make much sense, I'm confusing...
0
reply
5hyl33n
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#2
Report 10 months ago
#2
(Original post by zoe82003)
Hey, so, I'm catching up on lockdown stuff and I was wondering if there can be schemas inside of schemas. So, like, if there is a big schema, e.g. children thinking that 4 legged animals are dogs but only seeing small dogs than they see a bigger dog, will that size thing go into another schema inside 4 legs=dog schema but be a small and big dogs exist schema in that? Sorry if that doesn't make much sense, I'm confusing...
I'm sorry but that just went straight over my head. :laugh:
1
reply
zoe82003
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 10 months ago
#3
(Original post by 5hyl33n)
I'm sorry but that just went straight over my head. :laugh:
ah, sorry, i know, i don't make much sense 😂
0
reply
giella
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#4
Report 10 months ago
#4
Schemas are basically packages of procedural and semantic knowledge about the world that allow you to access the word around you. You go into a restaurant, you have a schema for what to do ie sit down, look at a menu, make a choice, order and be polite to those around you. A schema can also be a packet of knowledge about an object or an animal. Learning is thought to take place when your existing schema can no longer accommodate the situation it encounters. It becomes disequilibreated whilst it accommodates new information and/or procedures. Once it has, you’re equipped to understand or apply a new skill to that situation again.
I think what you’re trying to ask is how the semantic system is organised. Replace the word schema in your explanation with semantic categories and you’re basically explaining the semantic system.
Last edited by giella; 10 months ago
2
reply
Sint
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 10 months ago
#5
I am by no means an expert but I'm pretty sure "sub-schemas" aren't a thing - they just grow. So, using your example, the child might first see some small dogs and form the schema "4 legged animals". Then when they see a large dog, this schema adapts to include the new size. Then they might see a cat, and add that to the schema.
When the child learns to understand language, they will be taught the different names of these animals, and the schema will split into a separate one for each animal.
1
reply
zoe82003
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 10 months ago
#6
(Original post by Sint)
I am by no means an expert but I'm pretty sure "sub-schemas" aren't a thing - they just grow. So, using your example, the child might first see some small dogs and form the schema "4 legged animals". Then when they see a large dog, this schema adapts to include the new size. Then they might see a cat, and add that to the schema.
When the child learns to understand language, they will be taught the different names of these animals, and the schema will split into a separate one for each animal.
omg, thank you, that is exactly the answer I was looking for (lets ignore my brain fart above that I'm shocked you understood 😂) thankssss
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Should the school day be extended to help students catch up?

Yes (96)
27.51%
No (253)
72.49%

Watched Threads

View All