I have anxiety and I am really stressed - how can I stop feeling this way

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Anonymous #1
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Report Thread starter 5 months ago
#1
I have anxiety to the point where I feel breathless and am trying to catch my breath all the time. Also, I wear loose fitting clothes because I get cramps due to my anxiety.

I am more anxious now than ever because I have an exam at uni which I need to pass in order to not be kicked out. The exam is in 2 months time.

I don't have anyone to talk to about this. I am living with my parents for the time being because of the health crisis. Don't think I can talk to my parents about it - they don't understand me very well so there's no point.

The only thing that should be on my mind right now is to not fail the exam.

How can I keep it together (for just 2 months) for my upcoming exam?

I need some advice please
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macpatgh-Sheldon
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Hi, let me try to help you as far as is possible remotely, and without a full clinical history.

This is a problem, it appears, that needs sorting and in a timely manner in order to avoid you foiling your exams and effectively ending up with a big loan as an overhead, but without the benefit potentially gained by that investment.

Only you know how severe/debilitating your anxiety is - you say you get breathless, which suggests at least moderate severity. Do you end up sweating profusely at times, or suffer from palpitations [abnormal awareness of the heart beating] or diarrhoea?

In the current crisis, getting face-to-face medicaladvice is not possible except for life-threatening issues, but I have come across students who have been in a similar situation to whom I have recommended some medical treatment on a very short-term basis with a mild, quite safe anxiolytic; they were immensely grateful to me cos they had considerable relief and passed their exams; after this, due to the subsidence of the exam stress, they easily came off the med and carried on with life.

The benzodiazepines [and some newer drugs], if used correctly over a short period in low doses are not necessarily addictive as popular belief suggests, whereas they can sort issues of this type very effectively.

Please go to www.111.nhs.uk, and follow the instructions - enter your symptoms and other clinical features as and when asked; it is like a flow chart that will lead you to an appropriate solution - the site might arrange for a doctor to call you.

In the meantime, please relax with some soothing music or reading a novel, etc [do whatever you enjoy - a couple of days of break will not affect your preparation for exams] - in fact, it will put your mind into a different mindset, so that you will in due course be in a position where your stress levels will be lower, you will be rejuvenated and ready to dig into your study plan.

Best wishes & be safe! THINGS ALWAYS WORK OUT FOR THE BEST IN THE END - rule of nature.

M
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by macpatgh-Sheldon)
Hi, let me try to help you as far as is possible remotely, and without a full clinical history.

This is a problem, it appears, that needs sorting and in a timely manner in order to avoid you foiling your exams and effectively ending up with a big loan as an overhead, but without the benefit potentially gained by that investment.

Only you know how severe/debilitating your anxiety is - you say you get breathless, which suggests at least moderate severity. Do you end up sweating profusely at times, or suffer from palpitations [abnormal awareness of the heart beating] or diarrhoea?

In the current crisis, getting face-to-face medicaladvice is not possible except for life-threatening issues, but I have come across students who have been in a similar situation to whom I have recommended some medical treatment on a very short-term basis with a mild, quite safe anxiolytic; they were immensely grateful to me cos they had considerable relief and passed their exams; after this, due to the subsidence of the exam stress, they easily came off the med and carried on with life.

The benzodiazepines [and some newer drugs], if used correctly over a short period in low doses are not necessarily addictive as popular belief suggests, whereas they can sort issues of this type very effectively.

Please go to www.111.nhs.uk, and follow the instructions - enter your symptoms and other clinical features as and when asked; it is like a flow chart that will lead you to an appropriate solution - the site might arrange for a doctor to call you.

In the meantime, please relax with some soothing music or reading a novel, etc [do whatever you enjoy - a couple of days of break will not affect your preparation for exams] - in fact, it will put your mind into a different mindset, so that you will in due course be in a position where your stress levels will be lower, you will be rejuvenated and ready to dig into your study plan.

Best wishes & be safe! THINGS ALWAYS WORK OUT FOR THE BEST IN THE END - rule of nature.

M
Thank you for your reply back.

Yes, I sweat a bit when I am stressed and my chest slightly hurts (but I don't think it's anything serious - it's the kind you get after you've finished a long sprint). I don't have any medical problems.

I am not sure if I am up for taking drugs, even though they may be effective. Thank you for mentioning it though - definitely is something to think about.

I procrastinate quite a bit because it takes my mind off the exam. I end up being more stressed because there is a lot to cover.
Nothing's really enjoyable now with the pandemic and people self isolating. For example, I would usually have something to look forward to at uni,..hanging out with my friends. Now, I either go for a walk or stay at home for the sake of not catching the virus right before the exam. Even the exam is online and not in person.

I am slowly coming to terms with the same old routine every day.

Thank you and you too! I hope things work out for me.
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shebk
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Do you worry about your exam because of your health problem?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by shebk)
Do you worry about your exam because of your health problem?
I think the exam has triggered my feelings of anxiety. I am not usually this stressed out for an exam but this one will mean whether I can go into my next year of uni or not.
Also, a lot of things have accumulated on my mind. I am guilt-ridden because I had a lot of time to prepare but didn't apply the correct revision technique. I am worried about potentially getting kicked out of uni. I am demotivated when I see how much there is to still cover. I compare myself to my other mates who've already passed.

I am trying to see how I can give it my best for this exam without stressing myself to the core.
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shebk
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I think the exam has triggered my feelings of anxiety. I am not usually this stressed out for an exam but this one will mean whether I can go into my next year of uni or not.
Also, a lot of things have accumulated on my mind. I am guilt-ridden because I had a lot of time to prepare but didn't apply the correct revision technique. I am worried about potentially getting kicked out of uni. I am demotivated when I see how much there is to still cover. I compare myself to my other mates who've already passed.

I am trying to see how I can give it my best for this exam without stressing myself to the core.
What do you major in?
Do you think you study well on this course?
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