TheHistoryNerd_
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Currently, I have to fill in a reading record as part of my transition work but I'm unsure what it means by 'style'. There's a section called 'Themes & Style' but it's a really tiny box so I can't exactly start doing an in-depth analysis of anything. Can anyone give me an example and explain what it means by 'style'? Does it mean like a narrative ?
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Englishteacher24
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My guess would be that style is similar to genre. For example, Thomas Pynchon writes in a postmodern style. His work fits the postmodern genre (in terms of plot, mode of narration etc.) but his language also reflects postmodern conventions e.g. fragmentation and dense, often confusing / ambiguous imagery.
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TabithaFord99
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(Original post by TheHistoryNerd_)
Currently, I have to fill in a reading record as part of my transition work but I'm unsure what it means by 'style'. There's a section called 'Themes & Style' but it's a really tiny box so I can't exactly start doing an in-depth analysis of anything. Can anyone give me an example and explain what it means by 'style'? Does it mean like a narrative ?
Abrams defines style as: "the manner of linguistic expression in prose or verse" - essentially, HOW speakers or writers say whatever it is that they say.
The style of a work can be analysed in terms of - word choice; sentence structure and syntax; the density and types of figurative language; rhythm; sounds; rhetorical aims and devices.

A large number of words can be used to describe a particular style. For example: "ornate", "poetic", "simple" etc. But styles are also classified according to a particular period or tradition. So - "Restoration Drama" tells us the genre (drama) and the period/style (Restoration). "The metaphysical style" tells us we are probably dealing with poetry ("The metaphysicals" refer to a particular type of poetry). Let's take some more examples: "Victorian Gothic" would describe novels such as "The Castle of Otranto" and "Frankenstein". But "Urban Gothic" would describe the style of John Fowles' modern novel "The Collector". "Jane Eyre" could be considered "a romantic Victorian novel" in style as it is concerned with the marriage plot, but it is also "Gothic" as it contains lots of dark undercurrents and things that (literally) go bump in the night.

We also use "style" to refer to the very distinctive practice of an individual author. So, we might describe a playwright who uses a lot of long pauses and has characters who are menacing as "Pintersque" (a term that refers to the unique work of Harold Pinter). Likewise, you may have a poet who writes sonnets that concern themselves with love who you could say was "Shakespearean" in style.

I hope this helps. If there is a particular text you are struggling to define in terms of style let me know
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TheHistoryNerd_
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(Original post by TabithaFord99)
Abrams defines style as: "the manner of linguistic expression in prose or verse" - essentially, HOW speakers or writers say whatever it is that they say.
The style of a work can be analysed in terms of - word choice; sentence structure and syntax; the density and types of figurative language; rhythm; sounds; rhetorical aims and devices.

A large number of words can be used to describe a particular style. For example: "ornate", "poetic", "simple" etc. But styles are also classified according to a particular period or tradition. So - "Restoration Drama" tells us the genre (drama) and the period/style (Restoration). "The metaphysical style" tells us we are probably dealing with poetry ("The metaphysicals" refer to a particular type of poetry). Let's take some more examples: "Victorian Gothic" would describe novels such as "The Castle of Otranto" and "Frankenstein". But "Urban Gothic" would describe the style of John Fowles' modern novel "The Collector". "Jane Eyre" could be considered "a romantic Victorian novel" in style as it is concerned with the marriage plot, but it is also "Gothic" as it contains lots of dark undercurrents and things that (literally) go bump in the night.

We also use "style" to refer to the very distinctive practice of an individual author. So, we might describe a playwright who uses a lot of long pauses and has characters who are menacing as "Pintersque" (a term that refers to the unique work of Harold Pinter). Likewise, you may have a poet who writes sonnets that concern themselves with love who you could say was "Shakespearean" in style.

I hope this helps. If there is a particular text you are struggling to define in terms of style let me know
Wow! Thank you so much for taking the time to write this! I will admit it's a bit confusing for me but I sort of get it haha. I mostly read young adult books (I've recently been reading YA fantasy) do you have any idea what sort of style these kind of genre of books would be? Thanks again.
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TabithaFord99
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(Original post by TheHistoryNerd_)
Wow! Thank you so much for taking the time to write this! I will admit it's a bit confusing for me but I sort of get it haha. I mostly read young adult books (I've recently been reading YA fantasy) do you have any idea what sort of style these kind of genre of books would be? Thanks again.
You are very welcome.

You have already defined the style - YA fantasy is both a genre and a "style". I'd recommend you start reading more widely. At the standard of A level and beyond, you will be expected to be well versed in the classics (including modern classics.)

Let's start with some you might enjoy as a transition away from what you usually read:
"Never let me go" Kazuo Ishiguro might be a decent place to start. You might also enjoy 'Gulliver's Travels' (if you haven't already read this) and some of the magic realists - Marquez's "100 Years of Solitude" will appeal to you. These have the fantastical elements that you enjoy, but are written to a much higher literary standard. You might also want to try Angela Carter's shorts "The Bloody Chamber" which is a re-telling of many familiar fairy tales. You might not like some of these, but, as with anything (food, wine, films etc) you have to sample lots of different writers before you find what you enjoy. The great thing about reading quality fiction is that you are always learning - even when you don't enjoy a text you can learn from it.

good luck
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TheHistoryNerd_
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(Original post by TabithaFord99)
You are very welcome.

You have already defined the style - YA fantasy is both a genre and a "style". I'd recommend you start reading more widely. At the standard of A level and beyond, you will be expected to be well versed in the classics (including modern classics.)

Let's start with some you might enjoy as a transition away from what you usually read:
"Never let me go" Kazuo Ishiguro might be a decent place to start. You might also enjoy 'Gulliver's Travels' (if you haven't already read this) and some of the magic realists - Marquez's "100 Years of Solitude" will appeal to you. These have the fantastical elements that you enjoy, but are written to a much higher literary standard. You might also want to try Angela Carter's shorts "The Bloody Chamber" which is a re-telling of many familiar fairy tales. You might not like some of these, but, as with anything (food, wine, films etc) you have to sample lots of different writers before you find what you enjoy. The great thing about reading quality fiction is that you are always learning - even when you don't enjoy a text you can learn from it.

good luck
Thanks again. I don't just read YA fantasy, I do read classics and historical fiction too, I just enjoy reading YA fantasy the most at the moment. Thank you for the recommendations, I'll be sure to check them out, "The Bloody Chamber" sounds quite good.
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