aaa24
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Is it worth learning everything in the textbook as I'm finding that the specification points consist of 50% of the information in each chapter of the textbook so should I only strictly learn what the spec says or should I learn it in more detail?
(in class tests we always get asked questions which go into this extra detail and our class notes also go into more detail compared to the spec points so now I'm not sure what to do)
(I do igcse edexcel triple science)
Thanks :flower2:
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theJoyfulGeek
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(Original post by aaa24)
Is it worth learning everything in the textbook as I'm finding that the specification points consist of 50% of the information in each chapter of the textbook so should I only strictly learn what the spec says or should I learn it in more detail?
(in class tests we always get asked questions which go into this extra detail and our class notes also go into more detail compared to the spec points so now I'm not sure what to do)
(I do igcse edexcel triple science)
Thanks :flower2:
It's always best to learn stuff in as much detail as possible, so if you have time, it would be a good idea to learn everything in the textbook. The spec can often be a bit too brief...
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Broque_
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Learn what's in the specification. This should be available on the exam board's website. There are some textbooks which do just cover the specification, however, most of them do way too much. This isn't necessarily a bad thing. It's important at first since it helps you gain a wider understanding of it. But, if you're just going to be doing revision, then I would never use a textbook. Maybe a revision guide at most. There will never be a question which asks for more than the specification. There is no harm in learning more details though; it's useful in some topics, but I wouldn't do the whole book.
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brainzistheword
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(Original post by aaa24)
Is it worth learning everything in the textbook as I'm finding that the specification points consist of 50% of the information in each chapter of the textbook so should I only strictly learn what the spec says or should I learn it in more detail?
(in class tests we always get asked questions which go into this extra detail and our class notes also go into more detail compared to the spec points so now I'm not sure what to do)
(I do igcse edexcel triple science)
Thanks :flower2:
Is the textbook specific to your course or does it cover other exam boards? If it covers others, that may explain why it's a little more detailed.

There's nothing wrong with learning more details on a topic assuming you've got the time and it doesn't make things more complicated for you
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aaa24
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(Original post by brainzistheword)
Is the textbook specific to your course or does it cover other exam boards? If it covers others, that may explain why it's a little more detailed.

There's nothing wrong with learning more details on a topic assuming you've got the time and it doesn't make things more complicated for you
Hi, it's specific to my course - I also have the cgp revision guides and they're very brief compared to the textbook.....Is it worth just using the revision guide?
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MusicalMe101
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(Original post by aaa24)
Is it worth learning everything in the textbook as I'm finding that the specification points consist of 50% of the information in each chapter of the textbook so should I only strictly learn what the spec says or should I learn it in more detail?
(in class tests we always get asked questions which go into this extra detail and our class notes also go into more detail compared to the spec points so now I'm not sure what to do)
(I do igcse edexcel triple science)
Thanks :flower2:
I would stick to the specification as you probably won't find any of the other information on the exam. Some textbooks include more information than needed to give you more context and more knowledge in each topic, but as it is possible that students use different textbooks to prepare for the exams, I would suggest sticking to the specification for the main information, but not restricting yourself and looking at the other detail given when needed for questions set by your teacher. I'm assuming that your teacher just wants to give you as much knowledge as possible. I would also use the cgp revision guides and I can recommend the cgp science question cards for practise as I found them very useful.
Last edited by MusicalMe101; 1 week ago
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whitedwarf
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(Original post by aaa24)
Hi, it's specific to my course - I also have the cgp revision guides and they're very brief compared to the textbook.....Is it worth just using the revision guide?
i would recommend using the cgp revision guides i found them very useful for gcses & a-levels

if you come across a question which has content you don't know, make it into a flashcard or something
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brainzistheword
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(Original post by aaa24)
Hi, it's specific to my course - I also have the cgp revision guides and they're very brief compared to the textbook.....Is it worth just using the revision guide?
If I'm honest, I only ever used the CGP revision guides but I made sure I checked it against the spec to make sure all topics were covered. There's no harm in using a combination of both to give you a more rounded understanding of topics, but perhaps be selective on the ones you take further so you don't overwhelm yourself
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Sonu44
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Guys are any of you doing EDEXCEL for separate/triple science?
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theJoyfulGeek
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(Original post by Sonu44)
Guys are any of you doing EDEXCEL for separate/triple science?
I did Edexcel IGCSE triple science, and I'm now doing all 3 sciences for A level (2 Edexcel, 1 OCR).
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aaa24
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(Original post by Sonu44)
Guys are any of you doing EDEXCEL for separate/triple science?
Yeah
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aaa24
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(Original post by theJoyfulGeek)
I did Edexcel IGCSE triple science, and I'm now doing all 3 sciences for A level (2 Edexcel, 1 OCR).
Hi! Do u have any advice(specific to this course) as I’m doing the exact same course! Thank you
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theJoyfulGeek
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(Original post by aaa24)
Hi! Do u have any advice(specific to this course) as I’m doing the exact same course! Thank you
Something that I found really helpful was reading the specs, as that helped me see what I had done and what exactly I needed to know. I basically used the specification as a revision list for all of the end of topic tests.

The textbooks I had (orange and blue IGCSE ones with a penguin, weird thing, and dome shapes building on the front) were really chaotic and cluttered, and a nightmare to read - so I mainly worked off class notes, unless I needed to look for something specific.

Also, Edexcel IGCSE papers and Edexcel GCSE papers are different, but similar, so if you run out of past papers you can always use those! I found them to be more similar than Edexcel and other exam boards. Having said that, I didn't do many past papers, so I'm not an expert.

Also, this applies to all exam boards, but do past papers. Lots of them. And remember CORMS for Biology - it will save your life for the 6 markers! And in Chemistry, always be particular with the wording -the markscheme is ridiculously fussy and you will lose marks for things which are correct if you don't use the exact correct wording. For Physics, remember units, as there are lots of questions which try to trick you with that (e.g. cm instead of m). And double-check your calculator display before writing answers - you do not want to have correct working, everything correct, and then write 171 Nm instead of 117 Nm.

For all of them (especially Chemistry), the questions always repeat. I's be willing to bet that when you enter the exam hall, you will have already seen half of the questions in previous years' past papers.

Also, use a ruler! And bring a protractor with you to your exams just in case.

Also, for Chemistry, the moles topic: try and remember to use units, because it will make your life a lot easier when it comes to checking.

Edit- sorry about this long and rambling wall of text. I hope this isn't too terrifying, but you'll do amazingly!! And it all gets better at A level - it's so much more interesting!
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aaa24
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(Original post by theJoyfulGeek)
Something that I found really helpful was reading the specs, as that helped me see what I had done and what exactly I needed to know. I basically used the specification as a revision list for all of the end of topic tests.

The textbooks I had (orange and blue IGCSE ones with a penguin, weird thing, and dome shapes building on the front) were really chaotic and cluttered, and a nightmare to read - so I mainly worked off class notes, unless I needed to look for something specific.

Also, Edexcel IGCSE papers and Edexcel GCSE papers are different, but similar, so if you run out of past papers you can always use those! I found them to be more similar than Edexcel and other exam boards. Having said that, I didn't do many past papers, so I'm not an expert.

Also, this applies to all exam boards, but do past papers. Lots of them. And remember CORMS for Biology - it will save your life for the 6 markers! And in Chemistry, always be particular with the wording -the markscheme is ridiculously fussy and you will lose marks for things which are correct if you don't use the exact correct wording. For Physics, remember units, as there are lots of questions which try to trick you with that (e.g. cm instead of m). And double-check your calculator display before writing answers - you do not want to have correct working, everything correct, and then write 171 Nm instead of 117 Nm.

For all of them (especially Chemistry), the questions always repeat. I's be willing to bet that when you enter the exam hall, you will have already seen half of the questions in previous years' past papers.

Also, use a ruler! And bring a protractor with you to your exams just in case.

Also, for Chemistry, the moles topic: try and remember to use units, because it will make your life a lot easier when it comes to checking.

Edit- sorry about this long and rambling wall of text. I hope this isn't too terrifying, but you'll do amazingly!! And it all gets better at A level - it's so much more interesting!
oh no it has't it's so useful thank you! :fluffy: I've actually started revising from the textbooks (they do cover the topics in a different order from the spec and I agree it's so annoying!) and making flashcards with questions - would you advise against this from your experience then??
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theJoyfulGeek
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(Original post by aaa24)
oh no it has't it's so useful thank you! :fluffy: I've actually started revising from the textbooks (they do cover the topics in a different order from the spec and I agree it's so annoying!) and making flashcards with questions - would you advise against this from your experience then??
Everyone has different ways of learning and revising - one of my friends made flashcards and found it really useful. I never did - I revised from my notes by reading them, and then past papers. We both got 9s in all three sciences. It's just subjective - different people say different things.

If flashcards work for you, go for it! Good luck with your revision!
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aaa24
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(Original post by theJoyfulGeek)
Everyone has different ways of learning and revising - one of my friends made flashcards and found it really useful. I never did - I revised from my notes by reading them, and then past papers. We both got 9s in all three sciences. It's just subjective - different people say different things.

If flashcards work for you, go for it! Good luck with your revision!
Thank you!!
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Catchetat
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I created my own notes while I studied GCSE chemistry https://igcsechem.webs.com/
As others have said if short on time, read specification. If you have time, read a textbook.
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aaa24
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(Original post by Catchetat)
I created my own notes while I studied GCSE chemistry https://igcsechem.webs.com/
As others have said if short on time, read specification. If you have time, read a textbook.
that's such a useful website - thank you so much!
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