polzovatel1
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Hi
Can a second year law student apply for a deferred pupillage, say next January for a pupillage starting in 2023?
Thanks
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polzovatel1
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(Original post by polzovatel1)
Hi
Can a second year law student apply for a deferred pupillage, say next January for a pupillage starting in 2023?
Thanks
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Can a second year law student apply for a pupillage?
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Kessler`
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I don't think there's anything actually stopping you, but it's highly inadvisable.

1) You won't have anything like the required experience to demonstrate aptitude. Your application will simply not be on a par with the vast majority of candidates, let alone stand out. Chambers simply won't want to gamble on you at such an early stage and with such a long time to wait. Every set wants to get the best possible candidates in every round of applications. There are far too many other applicants who are safer bets than someone who shows promise in second year but could potentially derail over the following two years!
2) You may undermine your future chances. There are a number of chambers with whom you (unofficially) get 'one shot'. If you apply and your application is unimpressive, future applications are likely to end up being automatically sifted into the bin. Even if that is not the case, it will be hard to make your application stand out in the future when they've read it before.
3) You will be spending unneccessary time on pupillage applications which would be better served by building your CV and concentrating on your studies. Are you debating? Mooting? Getting work experience? Applying for scholarships/academic prizes?Mini-pupillages? Shadowing, marshalling? Volunteering? Spending time observing courts (albeit I understand that this far more limited in the current environment). Are you going above and beyond in your studies? The best thing you can do to help yourself is get a First! Oh, and don't forget to find time to enjoy yourself!


Seriously, you are worrying about this far too early. Pupillages are ultra competitive and the numbers this/next year are smaller than ever after the pandemic has affected many chambers. You need to make sure that when you apply, you have all your guns lined up on target and ready to present the best possible image of yourself. You simply cannot do that at your stage. Very few people actually achieve 'the holy grail', which is pupillage in your third year at uni, which is ready to start once you get through the BPTC. The majority of applicants get pupillage in the year they complete BPTC or perhaps the year after. That's the golden time, when you have enough on your application to demonstrate committment, experience and achievement without seeming 'left by the wayside'. It gets progressively harder to get interviews, in my experience, when you are going through your third, fourth rounds and beyond - not to mention the financial pressure you face! Keep your head down now and focus on improving your chances.
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polzovatel1
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(Original post by Kessler`)
I don't think there's anything actually stopping you, but it's highly inadvisable.

1) You won't have anything like the required experience to demonstrate aptitude. Your application will simply not be on a par with the vast majority of candidates, let alone stand out. Chambers simply won't want to gamble on you at such an early stage and with such a long time to wait. Every set wants to get the best possible candidates in every round of applications. There are far too many other applicants who are safer bets than someone who shows promise in second year but could potentially derail over the following two years!
2) You may undermine your future chances. There are a number of chambers with whom you (unofficially) get 'one shot'. If you apply and your application is unimpressive, future applications are likely to end up being automatically sifted into the bin. Even if that is not the case, it will be hard to make your application stand out in the future when they've read it before.
3) You will be spending unneccessary time on pupillage applications which would be better served by building your CV and concentrating on your studies. Are you debating? Mooting? Getting work experience? Applying for scholarships/academic prizes?Mini-pupillages? Shadowing, marshalling? Volunteering? Spending time observing courts (albeit I understand that this far more limited in the current environment). Are you going above and beyond in your studies? The best thing you can do to help yourself is get a First! Oh, and don't forget to find time to enjoy yourself!


Seriously, you are worrying about this far too early. Pupillages are ultra competitive and the numbers this/next year are smaller than ever after the pandemic has affected many chambers. You need to make sure that when you apply, you have all your guns lined up on target and ready to present the best possible image of yourself. You simply cannot do that at your stage. Very few people actually achieve 'the holy grail', which is pupillage in your third year at uni, which is ready to start once you get through the BPTC. The majority of applicants get pupillage in the year they complete BPTC or perhaps the year after. That's the golden time, when you have enough on your application to demonstrate committment, experience and achievement without seeming 'left by the wayside'. It gets progressively harder to get interviews, in my experience, when you are going through your third, fourth rounds and beyond - not to mention the financial pressure you face! Keep your head down now and focus on improving your chances.
Thank you very much for the detailed response, it was very useful
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leage_beagle
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To add to what Kessler has correctly said above, even if you do manage to get a pupillage in the 'holy grail' period, there's every chance that the ability that let you do so could have been spent taking things a bit more slowly, developing your skills and getting more experience, and getting a better pupillage a bit further down the line. Not to mention that, of course, those additional skills are helpful in addressing all the challenges that come after the offer of pupillage, in securing tenancy and beyond. The bar is a career that waits, and time taken doing other things first is often a good investment.
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polzovatel1
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(Original post by leage_beagle)
To add to what Kessler has correctly said above, even if you do manage to get a pupillage in the 'holy grail' period, there's every chance that the ability that let you do so could have been spent taking things a bit more slowly, developing your skills and getting more experience, and getting a better pupillage a bit further down the line. Not to mention that, of course, those additional skills are helpful in addressing all the challenges that come after the offer of pupillage, in securing tenancy and beyond. The bar is a career that waits, and time taken doing other things first is often a good investment.
Thank you very much
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