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Is this actually a motoring conviction? watch

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    Over christmas 2006, my brother was caught driving with no insurance.

    He was repremanded in court and handed a 28 day driving ban, which expired on the 25th December 2006.

    He was also fined.

    On his license is stamped "Short Period Disqualification" (See picture).



    Today we've come to insure him on a new car and, being the good citizen I am, went to declare it for him.

    However, the "conviction" doesn't have a code on the actual license. All the offenses on the list DO have a code (although I've found that is similar - Driving without insurance is IS10 or something).

    The license doesn't state what the ban is for.

    The first question - Do we actually declare it?

    Second question - If we don't declare it (and should have done), what potential problems could we stumble across?
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    DO declare it, it IS a motoring offence..potential problems COULD include an increase in insurance

    I think..
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    EDIT: Before he (and I) get slated, I should explain how my brother came to be driving with no insurance and how he only got away with 28 days and no points. XD

    He got the car in August as a birthday present. My father had agreed to pay everything (ie tax, MOT, insurance etc) so all payments were coming out of his account. He then cancelled the insurance and failed to tell anyone this.

    The judge understood this in court (and understood that my poor brother, only driving 6 months, had no clue this had happened and thought he was insured) and thus only handed him 28 days ban (and the advice to handle all his affairs himself in future.)
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    ring up the insurance company and ask them?
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    (Original post by Spotty Dog)
    EDIT: Before he (and I) get slated, I should explain how my brother came to be driving with no insurance and how he only got away with 28 days and no points. XD

    He got the car in August as a birthday present. My father had agreed to pay everything (ie tax, MOT, insurance etc) so all payments were coming out of his account. He then cancelled the insurance and failed to tell anyone this.

    The judge understood this in court (and understood that my poor brother, only driving 6 months, had no clue this had happened and thought he was insured) and thus only handed him 28 days ban (and the advice to handle all his affairs himself in future.)
    Your dad cancelled his sons insurance and didn't tell him :confused:

    Is that right?
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    (Original post by Spotty Dog)
    Over christmas 2006, my brother was caught driving with no insurance.

    He was repremanded in court and handed a 28 day driving ban, which expired on the 25th December 2006.

    He was also fined.

    On his license is stamped "Short Period Disqualification" (See picture).



    Today we've come to insure him on a new car and, being the good citizen I am, went to declare it for him.

    However, the "conviction" doesn't have a code on the actual license. All the offenses on the list DO have a code (although I've found that is similar - Driving without insurance is IS10 or something).

    The license doesn't state what the ban is for.

    The first question - Do we actually declare it?

    Second question - If we don't declare it (and should have done), what potential problems could we stumble across?
    He must have been given the code in court. He was convicted in court - of course it's a motoring conviction. It is strange though that the code is not on the licence there though.
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    Well, it's certainly a motoring conviction. Best thing to do would be to ring an insurance company and find out how they handle it - worst thing would be to not declare it!
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    Its best to declare it. The insurance companies will use anything to try and void your policy in the event of a claim.
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    (Original post by Bavarian Motor Works)
    Your dad cancelled his sons insurance and didn't tell him :confused:

    Is that right?
    They are both Mr D E Ward. When the insurance companies call/when he calls them, they know no different.
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    (Original post by SillyFencer)
    He must have been given the code in court. He was convicted in court - of course it's a motoring conviction. It is strange though that the code is not on the licence there though.
    He was repremanded, not convicted. Does that not make a difference?
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    (Original post by Spotty Dog)
    He was repremanded, not convicted. Does that not make a difference?
    A disqualification can only be given after a conviction, and the endorsement is a result of the conviction too. He was convicted.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    A disqualification can only be given after a conviction, and the endorsement is a result of the conviction too. He was convicted.
    Ah, ok.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    A disqualification can only be given after a conviction, and the endorsement is a result of the conviction too. He was convicted.
    Yeah, I'd agree with this.

    Yes always mention it when getting insurance or else the insurance will void and then face the possibility of being banned for the same thing.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    A disqualification can only be given after a conviction, and the endorsement is a result of the conviction too. He was convicted.
    :ditto:

    yes thats obvious didnt cotton on to that-he had to be convicted to recieve the ban. You cant be punished without being convicted lol. Good bloke, i salute u
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    he has broken the law and has been convicted of it (through no fault of his own in this case.). There should be a conviction code and date printed on his license by the dvla. it should be one of the following IN-10, IN-12, IN-14, IN-16 (using an uninsured vehicle, the number is down to their discretion as to how serious they deem the offense, and the type of road etc.)

    The first people to call are the DVLA, as they should have provided the code, and will be able to tell you the correct one to use.

    Make sure you do tell all and any insurance companies about this, and provide them with the code the dvla ^ provide.


    If i was him i'd be on to that insurance company like a bat - they legally have to ask ANY caller (regardless of having the same name) a series of Data protection questions, including: are you the policy holder? and DOB etc. To cancel a policy you HAVE to be the policy holder as they are legally bounding contracts, so if they cancelled it after speaking to your father they have broken data protection rules and caused all this. (they could easily tell that it was a grown man from his voice if nothing else) they will most likely record all their calls, and so can investigate this.

    i would be after compensation if i was your brother, its going to be on his license (in insurance terms) for up to 5 years, not to mention policy price increases, court fees etc....

    I'd also get onto the FSA Financial Services Authority as they regulate all insurance companies and Data Protection issues and will be able to offer advice and support.

    (by the way part of my job is "motor service representative" in a car insurance company!)
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    As said yes it is a conviction and you have to declare it. expect it to add a fair old bit to the premium as well...
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    (Original post by zmaricz)
    he has broken the law and has been convicted of it (through no fault of his own in this case.). There should be a conviction code and date printed on his license by the dvla. it should be one of the following IN-10, IN-12, IN-14, IN-16 (using an uninsured vehicle, the number is down to their discretion as to how serious they deem the offense, and the type of road etc.)

    The first people to call are the DVLA, as they should have provided the code, and will be able to tell you the correct one to use.

    Make sure you do tell all and any insurance companies about this, and provide them with the code the dvla ^ provide.


    If i was him i'd be on to that insurance company like a bat - they legally have to ask ANY caller (regardless of having the same name) a series of Data protection questions, including: are you the policy holder? and DOB etc. To cancel a policy you HAVE to be the policy holder as they are legally bounding contracts, so if they cancelled it after speaking to your father they have broken data protection rules and caused all this. (they could easily tell that it was a grown man from his voice if nothing else) they will most likely record all their calls, and so can investigate this.

    i would be after compensation if i was your brother, its going to be on his license (in insurance terms) for up to 5 years, not to mention policy price increases, court fees etc....

    I'd also get onto the FSA Financial Services Authority as they regulate all insurance companies and Data Protection issues and will be able to offer advice and support.

    (by the way part of my job is "motor service representative" in a car insurance company!)
    Thank you for this - We didn't even considering anything like compensation. It's just a standard ****-you-over thing that my father seems to enjoy doing.
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    (Original post by Spotty Dog)
    Thank you for this - We didn't even considering anything like compensation. It's just a standard ****-you-over thing that my father seems to enjoy doing.
    They should certainly be guaranteeing not to increase premiums solely because of this conviction, and then handing over some money for the inconvenience and distress.
 
 
 
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