Marx2020
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#1
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I currently hold a bachelors in Engineering which I realised I didn't want to do for a career, I only stayed because of pressure really (I know, I know), so I decided to get a Master's in Business (which got me my current job). Now that I'm older (been in work for two years after my masters, and was late to uni anyway), I am thinking about doing a Law Degree with OU. So, I don't want to be a lawyer, but I am very interested in the subject, have done a lot of research etc, and its not that bad financially with graduate entry. I don't really see a downside as I have come to terms with having to do it in my free time etc. However, I am wondering if my current employer will be like, what the hell are you doing. And if I was to go for a new job at a later date, would studying a law degree on top of my other education come across as over qualified (on paper) and/or like a waste of time (ie, why did you study law with no intention of being a lawyer... I like the subject doesn't inspire confidence I don't think).... thoughts?
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Joleee
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#2
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may i ask what you want to do in law if not become a solicitor and are you sure you need a law degree to do so? fyi it usually is that bad financially upon graduation, at least for the positions you'll be qualified for.

why would your current employer have a problem with you doing a degree in your free time?

what about the subject of law do you like? i love it, but ask 'cause there are a lot of misconceptions about what academic law actually is in practice.
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Marx2020
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#3
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(Original post by Joleee)
may i ask what you want to do in law if not become a solicitor and are you sure you need a law degree to do so? fyi it usually is that bad financially upon graduation, at least for the positions you'll be qualified for.

why would your current employer have a problem with you doing a degree in your free time?

what about the subject of law do you like? i love it, but ask 'cause there are a lot of misconceptions about what academic law actually is in practice.
Thanks for your reply. first time on here, wasn't sure what my chances were.

To be honest, I'm thinking it would benefit my career in the terms of, I have to write contracts for example, so an understanding around contract law would be helpful. I also like to start my own business at some point in my life, and thus an understanding of employment law etc is unlikely to be detrimental. Financially, in the UK for me to study the Law course with Open University (graduate entry) is £4000 across 4 years. Which in my opinion is very manageable with a strong budget.

Probably nothing, I just haven't approached the subject and I'm thinking along the lines that they might be like, well if you're not 100% focused on your current job. Its probably a silly concern, but one nonetheless.

Sort of already answered this one above, but mostly contract law and tort law. I generally think all law is fascinating and of course it affects us all pretty much every day, and in my head, a greater understanding of what and how would be equally interesting and useful. Could you please expand on those misconceptions? You're now worrying me that I'm watching too much Netflix in lockdown and I may not actually enjoy law as an academic pursuit.
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Joleee
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#4
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(Original post by Marx2020)
Thanks for your reply. first time on here, wasn't sure what my chances were.

To be honest, I'm thinking it would benefit my career in the terms of, I have to write contracts for example, so an understanding around contract law would be helpful. I also like to start my own business at some point in my life, and thus an understanding of employment law etc is unlikely to be detrimental. Financially, in the UK for me to study the Law course with Open University (graduate entry) is £4000 across 4 years. Which in my opinion is very manageable with a strong budget.

Probably nothing, I just haven't approached the subject and I'm thinking along the lines that they might be like, well if you're not 100% focused on your current job. Its probably a silly concern, but one nonetheless.

Sort of already answered this one above, but mostly contract law and tort law. I generally think all law is fascinating and of course it affects us all pretty much every day, and in my head, a greater understanding of what and how would be equally interesting and useful. Could you please expand on those misconceptions? You're now worrying me that I'm watching too much Netflix in lockdown and I may not actually enjoy law as an academic pursuit.
if you want to know how to draft a proper contract, a law degree will not help you . it's all theory, like 'how does a contract come into existence' but does not tell you what to write into your terms and conditions to make them legally binding and in your favour. if you need to draft a proper contract while you're self employed, you will need to hire a solicitor (or just write whatever you want and hope your employees/clients don't make a fuss about it). that's why they make you do the LPC and two years training contract after uni, and even then you are supervised under persons more senior than you.

there are a million misconceptions, but for the purposes of this i'd say the misconception is that law is a vocational degree that makes you qualified to give legal advice and be a solicitor for yourself; except it's all theory and how the legal system works. it's not like you'll learn how to apply for divorce if you do family law (for example).

before i did my degree, i studied to become a law clerk which in practice is actually more beneficial (if you have no intention of becoming a solicitor). does a programme like that exist in the UK (obviously not from here)?
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Marx2020
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#5
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(Original post by Joleee)
if you want to know how to draft a proper contract, a law degree will not help you . it's all theory, like 'how does a contract come into existence' but does not tell you what to write into your terms and conditions to make them legally binding and in your favour. if you need to draft a proper contract while you're self employed, you will need to hire a solicitor (or just write whatever you want and hope your employees/clients don't make a fuss about it). that's why they make you do the LPC and two years training contract after uni, and even then you are supervised under persons more senior than you.

there are a million misconceptions, but for the purposes of this i'd say the misconception is that law is a vocational degree that makes you qualified to give legal advice and be a solicitor for yourself; except it's all theory and how the legal system works. it's not like you'll learn how to apply for divorce if you do family law (for example).

before i did my degree, i studied to become a law clerk which in practice is actually more beneficial (if you have no intention of becoming a solicitor). does a programme like that exist in the UK (obviously not from here)?
Surely by the fact of studying contract law and the relevant case law one would be able to understand contracts etc better? Writing them is a small part of my job (as you say, I draft something that we are looking for for example and then a actual lawyer does their thing) but also receiving them, understanding your rights as a business, your responsibilities on a contract for example, or even responding to tenders would be improved by knowing what you're actually reading?

Yeah I get that part, I think its more of a TV thing that you can represent yourself, no? Definitely not in the UK anyway. How the legal system works, precedent etc would all be quite interesting to me I think though as well. If I don't plan on being a lawyer, I can get one should I need them, but also the skills picked up from further study (skills from study in general) of law, attention to detail etc etc would be useful no? If we are not learning, we are not growing eh?

I think you can yes, I have seen something like that. That would be more vocational work no?
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