kimR
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Hi, I’m deciding on what course to apply for and I want to know if it’s important a course has accreditations and how it impacts your career prospects in the long run. This is because I want to do financial mathematics but it doesn’t come with any accreditations whereas accounting and finance does and I am stuck between the two.
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Uni of Hull Students
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(Original post by kimR)
Hi, I’m deciding on what course to apply for and I want to know if it’s important a course has accreditations and how it impacts your career prospects in the long run. This is because I want to do financial mathematics but it doesn’t come with any accreditations whereas accounting and finance does and I am stuck between the two.
Hi kimR

At Hull for example, for courses such as Accounting, the accreditation then means that it offers exemptions from some of the professional exams of all the major accountancy organisations. This is because the course is accredited by ACCA (also as an Accelerate Partner), CIMA (as a University Partner), CIPFA, ICAEW (as a Partner in Learning), HKICPA and CPA Australia.
But it is possible that this varies University to University, so it is worth checking on the course details why the course is accredited and the benefits which it may have.

Hope this helps

Emily
University of Hull Student Representative
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AW_1983
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(Original post by kimR)
Hi, I’m deciding on what course to apply for and I want to know if it’s important a course has accreditations and how it impacts your career prospects in the long run. This is because I want to do financial mathematics but it doesn’t come with any accreditations whereas accounting and finance does and I am stuck between the two.
It's not important because most graduates in accounting firms didn't study accountancy at university in the first place. And nor should you.

Why on earth get into £50k of student debt to be taught accountancy that employers will teach you anyway AND pay you to learn? A lot of firms will not even let you claim the exemptions you earn because they want you on the same program as the rest of the cohort.

If you want to go to university and you want it to help your accountancy career, then do something that will make you more bespoke to future employers. I would recommend Law, Modern Languages, Engineering or a technology related degree. Or maybe Psychology which is growing in relevance in the business world.

Also, do bear in mind the Big 4 take on apprentices at 18. Going to university when you have the A-Levels needed for an apprenticeship place is quite risky because you could come out with a 2:2 or worse and not be eligible to apply for the graduate schemes.
Last edited by AW_1983; 1 month ago
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ajj2000
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(Original post by kimR)
Hi, I’m deciding on what course to apply for and I want to know if it’s important a course has accreditations and how it impacts your career prospects in the long run. This is because I want to do financial mathematics but it doesn’t come with any accreditations whereas accounting and finance does and I am stuck between the two.
Accounting and Finance courses really don't have accreditations. The universities seriously oversell their links with professional bodies - which pretty much any educational institute anywhere in the world can gain.

Accreditation is only really important in areas like engineering where its evidence that the course meets the standards expected, and clears a barrier to institute membership.
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kimR
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(Original post by AW_1983)
It's not important because most graduates in accounting firms didn't study accountancy at university in the first place. And nor should you.

Why on earth get into £50k of student debt to be taught accountancy that employers will teach you anyway AND pay you to learn? A lot of firms will not even let you claim the exemptions you earn because they want you on the same program as the rest of the cohort.

If you want to go to university and you want it to help your accountancy career, then do something that will make you more bespoke to future employers. I would recommend Law, Modern Languages, Engineering or a technology related degree. Or maybe Psychology which is growing in relevance in the business world.

Also, do bear in mind the Big 4 take on apprentices at 18. Going to university when you have the A-Levels needed for an apprenticeship place is quite risky because you could come out with a 2:2 or worse and not be eligible to apply for the graduate schemes.
okay thanks, i've decided on a maths and finance degree. I wasn't aware that people could do psychology and get a job in accountancy. I'm trying to look at apprenticeships but most of them are like accounting or business or technology and its so hard to choose because in don't necessarily know if I want to be an accountant in future.
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AW_1983
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(Original post by kimR)
okay thanks, i've decided on a maths and finance degree. I wasn't aware that people could do psychology and get a job in accountancy. I'm trying to look at apprenticeships but most of them are like accounting or business or technology and its so hard to choose because in don't necessarily know if I want to be an accountant in future.
One of the partners at Deloitte when I was there did Psychology. One of the directors had done forestry.

There's always been this divide in understanding between students and accountancy recruiters that I do try and clear up. Students think they have to study something particular to get in whereas recruiters just want someone bright with a 2:1 in any subject. Most people I've encountered in accountancy firms don't have a relevant degree. Go on LinkedIn and look for yourself.

Personally, if you do Maths and Finance and you get a good result, I think you'll be selling yourself a big short as an accountant though. I think you should aim to become a data science in the banking sector and make real money.
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kimR
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(Original post by AW_1983)
One of the partners at Deloitte when I was there did Psychology. One of the directors had done forestry.

There's always been this divide in understanding between students and accountancy recruiters that I do try and clear up. Students think they have to study something particular to get in whereas recruiters just want someone bright with a 2:1 in any subject. Most people I've encountered in accountancy firms don't have a relevant degree. Go on LinkedIn and look for yourself.

Personally, if you do Maths and Finance and you get a good result, I think you'll be selling yourself a big short as an accountant though. I think you should aim to become a data science in the banking sector and make real money.
yes that's kind of my aim, i don't really want to end up being an accountant but my careers advisor is sure that everyone ends up there. The thing is there are data science degrees being introduced and i hope i won't be able to get a job because my degree is not that specific
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AW_1983
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(Original post by kimR)
yes that's kind of my aim, i don't really want to end up being an accountant but my careers advisor is sure that everyone ends up there. The thing is there are data science degrees being introduced and i hope i won't be able to get a job because my degree is not that specific
Trust me, if you do Maths and Finance and you study hard, you'll be fine. Your careers adviser sounds like a teacher who's never left education in their life.

I would actually recommend your path over those looking to do data science at the undergraduate level. Those data science degrees are great for plods like me who might want to know a bit more about data science but the ones who excel in the field are the ones who get a solid grounding in maths first (data science degrees only cover stats).
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kimR
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(Original post by AW_1983)
Trust me, if you do Maths and Finance and you study hard, you'll be fine. Your careers adviser sounds like a teacher who's never left education in their life.

I would actually recommend your path over those looking to do data science at the undergraduate level. Those data science degrees are great for plods like me who might want to know a bit more about data science but the ones who excel in the field are the ones who get a solid grounding in maths first (data science degrees only cover stats).
hahahaha, i preferred a maths and finance degree over just a basic maths degree because I find it more interesting and (its not as hard lol)
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AW_1983
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(Original post by kimR)
hahahaha, i preferred a maths and finance degree over just a basic maths degree because I find it more interesting and (its not as hard lol)
It'll be a good grounding for FinTech. Get yourself onto a bank's technology graduate programme (you don't need an ICT degree for it) and get them to fund an MSc in Data Science. And if you really want to make money, follow that up with a part time PhD on the job (but an MSc is pretty lucrative on its own).
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