Adam_pir
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Hi,

Done
Thank you
Last edited by Adam_pir; 1 year ago
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999tigger
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(Original post by Adam_pir)
Hi,

I have a Bachelor's degree with distinction
Master degree with honors
Second master's degree with Excellent

I am currently about to complete the third master's degree via distance learning in the UK, and my plan from the start was to obtain a master's degree with distinction, but now it seems very difficult,

There are 5 courses
The first course I got 70%
The second course 68%
Third 65%
Fourth 65%
The fifth maybe 68%

It seems that the final result will be Merit

I am completely dissatisfied, but this happened !!!

Is Merit a good grade?

Thank you
Why are you doing so many masters degrees? Get experience as you are past academics, now. They wont really care whether you got a distinction or not.
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Sentenced_to
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This is an unpleasant outcome I am afraid. However, you can always do a fourth Master's to overcome it.

Good luck!
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Mike Jordan
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I don't think it is. Everybody in our year doing BTEC's has been saying this.

Isn't it
Distinction = A grade
Merit = C grade
Pass = E grade
Fail = U

I would think that is the proper way, Otherwise, you could basically do the very minimal to pass and get a bloody C grade equavalent!

I think people must get it confuzzled witrh GCSE level BTECs (Level 2?)
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Lshort17
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(Original post by Mike Jordan)
I don't think it is. Everybody in our year doing BTEC's has been saying this.

Isn't it
Distinction = A grade
Merit = C grade
Pass = E grade
Fail = U

I would think that is the proper way, Otherwise, you could basically do the very minimal to pass and get a bloody C grade equavalent!

I think people must get it confuzzled witrh GCSE level BTECs (Level 2?)
Dont think he/she is referring to btecs
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Lshort17
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Found this on the internet, no idea if its correct as im not familiar with it


‘If you have a “merit” on your diploma, it indicates that you graduated with 2i, as known as second class honours upper division classification. This is a really good score, as most of the employers require you to have that kind of grade and above.’
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Sentenced_to
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(Original post by Lshort17)
Found this on the internet, no idea if its correct as im not familiar with it


‘If you have a “merit” on your diploma, it indicates that you graduated with 2i, as known as second class honours upper division classification. This is a really good score, as most of the employers require you to have that kind of grade and above.’
The dude already has 3 degrees. Do you think that anyone in the world will care the least about the classification of his 4th - especially an employer? JEEZZUS, some common sense, please....
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Adam_pir
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(Original post by Sentenced_to)
The dude already has 3 degrees. Do you think that anyone in the world will care the least about the classification of his 4th - especially an employer? JEEZZUS, some common sense, please....3
You. Listen, I have 3 or 4 masters , this is NOT your business,. Did you pay anything?

So, leave this topic.
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Student-95
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No. The majority of graduates will have the same or better.
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GabiAbi84
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(Original post by Adam_pir)
Hi,

I have a Bachelor's degree with distinction
Master degree with honors
Second master's degree with Excellent

I am currently about to complete the third master's degree via distance learning in the UK, and my plan from the start was to obtain a master's degree with distinction, but now it seems very difficult,

There are 5 courses
The first course I got 70%
The second course 68%
Third 65%
Fourth 65%
The fifth maybe 68%

It seems that the final result will be Merit

I am completely dissatisfied, but this happened !!!

Is Merit a good grade?

Thank you
Depends on what you mean by “good” it’s obviously not the best but also not the worst. It is what it is.
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Sentenced_to
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(Original post by Adam_pir)
You. Listen, I have 3 or 4 masters , this is NOT your business,. Did you pay anything?

So, leave this topic.
Sad thing is that my comments were the most constructive that you will ever get. Unless you like to sniff corks (and to show off) of course... Bye bye. :itsme:
Last edited by Sentenced_to; 1 year ago
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chaotic1328
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Three Master's are not particularly over the top, depending on the circumstances. A second master's may be taken for a change in the direction of study, or to make up for the low reputation of the first master's if its from a country without a high academic reputation, or to make up for a bad grade in the previous master's. A third master's could also be justified for any combination of these reasons. It's probably best not to criticise without knowing the full facts, or to judge someone life decisions based on your own criteria.

Back on topic, a merit is considered to be a 'very good' result, not as good as a distinction which is considered 'excellent', but better than a pass, which is considered 'good'. If we were to translate that to an undergraduate grades, it would be in the 'very good' category: First (70+) = excellent, Upper-Second (60-69) = very good, Lower-second (50-59) = good, Third/Pass (40-49) = average. Here I am using the 'old' scale of grades, and not sure if it is still appropriate, as it seems that only upper-seconds and firsts are considered 'good' degrees theses days, as defined by the league tables.
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Sentenced_to
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(Original post by chaotic1328)
Three Master's are not particularly over the top, depending on the circumstances. A second master's may be taken for a change in the direction of study, or to make up for the low reputation of the first master's if its from a country without a high academic reputation, or to make up for a bad grade in the previous master's. A third master's could also be justified for any combination of these reasons. It's probably best not to criticise without knowing the full facts, or to judge someone life decisions based on your own criteria.

Back on topic, a merit is considered to be a 'very good' result, not as good as a distinction which is considered 'excellent', but better than a pass, which is considered 'good'. If we were to translate that to an undergraduate grades, it would be in the 'very good' category: First (70+) = excellent, Upper-Second (60-69) = very good, Lower-second (50-59) = good, Third/Pass (40-49) = average. Here I am using the 'old' scale of grades, and not sure if it is still appropriate, as it seems that only upper-seconds and firsts are considered 'good' degrees theses days, as defined by the league tables.
a) Employers do not care about a masters classification. They certainly won't care for a bachelor's and three master's classification. Actually, they will probably say that he is 'overqualified' even if he had 4 pass degrees.

b) In case he is looking to do a PhD the admissions team will ask for transcripts. There, they will see his exact marks, and not a classification so it is again irrelevant.

d) End of story. Everything else is exclusively about the personal feel-good about an achievement (that is of course understandable up to a point, but that's it).
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Lshort17
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(Original post by Sentenced_to)
The dude already has 3 degrees. Do you think that anyone in the world will care the least about the classification of his 4th - especially an employer? JEEZZUS, some common sense, please....
If you havent got anything nice to say dont say anything. Just trying to help!

I did say i dont know much about this topic so...
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chaotic1328
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(Original post by Sentenced_to)
b) In case he is looking to do a PhD the admissions team will ask for transcripts. There, they will see his exact marks, and not a classification so it is again irrelevant.
I am not sure how much you know about PhD admissions, but the classification of the master's degree (where a master's is required) is very much relevant. The transcript will you the grades of individuals modules, the number of attempts etc, but the classification is the overall achievement, and there is a strong correlation between the two.
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Student-95
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(Original post by chaotic1328)
Three Master's are not particularly over the top, depending on the circumstances. A second master's may be taken for a change in the direction of study, or to make up for the low reputation of the first master's if its from a country without a high academic reputation, or to make up for a bad grade in the previous master's. A third master's could also be justified for any combination of these reasons. It's probably best not to criticise without knowing the full facts, or to judge someone life decisions based on your own criteria.

Back on topic, a merit is considered to be a 'very good' result, not as good as a distinction which is considered 'excellent', but better than a pass, which is considered 'good'. If we were to translate that to an undergraduate grades, it would be in the 'very good' category: First (70+) = excellent, Upper-Second (60-69) = very good, Lower-second (50-59) = good, Third/Pass (40-49) = average. Here I am using the 'old' scale of grades, and not sure if it is still appropriate, as it seems that only upper-seconds and firsts are considered 'good' degrees theses days, as defined by the league tables.
That scale is definitely not appropriate. In 2015/16 only 5% of grads got a third - it's not 'average' it is very bad. About 75% of grads get a 2.1 or higher so a 2.2 is also bad as it puts you in the bottom 25% and lots of grad jobs will automatically reject you. 2.1 is average and 1st is good.
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Sentenced_to
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(Original post by Student-95)
That scale is definitely not appropriate. In 2015/16 only 5% of grads got a third - it's not 'average' it is very bad. About 75% of grads get a 2.1 or higher so a 2.2 is also bad as it puts you in the bottom 25% and lots of grad jobs will automatically reject you. 2.1 is average and 1st is good.
A 2:2 or a 3rd will only make your life a little difficult when searching to find your first good job. Some adjustments and/or compromises may be required. After this and as you get older and more experienced, the classification won't matter. Therefore, you can also do a master's even at a top 20 uni (perhaps not just after you graduate), easily! I would use "very bad" only for dropping out, and even then perhaps only for permanently dropping out...

@chaotic1328's scale is fine. Perhaps not perfectly fine today with all this grade inflation, but is surely was about 20 years ago, or so...
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Realitysreflexx
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Three master's is very impressive.... Are you going for a job now? Or just doing them for fun 😂.

The distinction is fine...grades don't define you.
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chaotic1328
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(Original post by Student-95)
That scale is definitely not appropriate. In 2015/16 only 5% of grads got a third - it's not 'average' it is very bad. About 75% of grads get a 2.1 or higher so a 2.2 is also bad as it puts you in the bottom 25% and lots of grad jobs will automatically reject you. 2.1 is average and 1st is good.
In which case, I would argue that a new classification system is needed. Having 75% of people in the first two tiers doesn't really help to distinguish the the top achievers from the rest.
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Student-95
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(Original post by chaotic1328)
In which case, I would argue that a new classification system is needed. Having 75% of people in the first two tiers doesn't really help to distinguish the the top achievers from the rest.
Well the top achievers get a first but more granularity wouldn't hurt.
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