How do you revise?

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Nadia19
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How do people revise? Like what do you do to revise? I always see tips and tricks on revising on YouTube but they never say how to revise. I suck at revising mainly because I don’t know how to do it then I start procrastinating which I’m doing rn 😂

Could someone tell me how they revise? Flash cards, reading etc

Would be great help x ty
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fr3g
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(Original post by Nadia19)
How do people revise? Like what do you do to revise? I also see tips and tricks on revising on YouTube but they never say how to revise. I suck at revising mainly because I don’t know how to do it 😂

Could someone tell me how they revise? Flash cards, reading etc

Would be great help x ty
I write up my notes as flashcards, then i will take a topic, learn all the flash cards and then do as many practise questions as possible to practise application.
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University of Portsmouth Student Rep
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(Original post by Nadia19)
How do people revise? Like what do you do to revise? I always see tips and tricks on revising on YouTube but they never say how to revise. I suck at revising mainly because I don’t know how to do it then I start procrastinating which I’m doing rn 😂

Could someone tell me how they revise? Flash cards, reading etc

Would be great help x ty
Hey Nadia19

I personally like to write my notes out on flashcards - the key points - and then rewrite these until I know them or ask someone to test me on them!
I get the information for the cards from my class notes and a revision guide (when I was doing GCSE and A-levels, which I found useful

I also used the specification for each exam to use as a guide for what I needed to know, this way I didn't miss out any key points and it worked really well

I hope this helps!
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5hyl33n
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(Original post by Nadia19)
How do people revise? Like what do you do to revise? I always see tips and tricks on revising on YouTube but they never say how to revise. I suck at revising mainly because I don’t know how to do it then I start procrastinating which I’m doing rn 😂

Could someone tell me how they revise? Flash cards, reading etc

Would be great help x ty
Which subjects are you asking for?
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Broque_
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The best thing you can do to help yourself when revising is to focus in your lessons.

General revision methods I use:
- Practice questions and past papers. This only applies if you've covered most to all the content. Just blasting through questions, since you know, that's what you'll be doing in the final exam. It helps things I've learnt to stick, and it's really useful quick revision on the day of the exam. If you have a portfolio of answers, you can just look up the answer for the question you have.

- Teach yourself/someone. There really isn't many other ways to make something stick than teach it. For me this usually meant making resources, powerpoints, workbooks etc. as if I was the teacher. I found this most useful in English lit and Bio. If they're good enough you can even try to sell them, I've made a very miniscule sum of money selling my revision resources/powerpoints/essays on tes.

- Mind maps and flash cards. There isn't a formula for ways to format these, you just have to experiment and see what you like/what's the most time efficient for you. The key of making mind maps or flash cards though is that it's the second round of revision. What I mean by this is, for example, you first make more detailed notes of a topic in a book, then go on to make flash cards, not flash cards directly from the thick textbook, because then they'll 90% of the time end up too selective, or too broad.

- Periodic revision. Spread out your revision of topics/subjects. The best way to keep things in your long term memory is to continuously go over them periodically, i.e., let's say you revised photosynthesis one day, after a week, come back and revise it a little bit, after 2 weeks, come back and revise it a little again, etc. If that made any sense.

:cheers:
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Tarayani25
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Honestly there is no particular manner to study effectively. I would advise you to test out the various recommendations that people have mentioned step by step and stick to what is working for you.
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aubindes bois
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(Original post by Nadia19)
How do people revise? Like what do you do to revise? I always see tips and tricks on revising on YouTube but they never say how to revise. I suck at revising mainly because I don’t know how to do it then I start procrastinating which I’m doing rn 😂

Could someone tell me how they revise? Flash cards, reading etc

Would be great help x ty
Hi Nadia19,

I believe you have 2 key issues
Issue 1: you mistake method with tools.
Issue 2: you lack a strategy to tailor your resources to your objectives

Issue 1: you mistake method with tools.
There is a big difference between a method and a tool.
Eg " spaced repetition" is a method
"Flashcard" is a tool to implement "spaced repetition"
FOr more details you can take a look at this https://wikidiff.com/tool/method#:~:...%20process)%3A.
In order to build a " how to revise" that works for you, that is tailored to the resources you have, and that you can replicate anytime without having to figure all it out again, focus on the method. THen find appropriate tools.


Issue 2: you lack a strategy to tailor your resources to your objectives
A strategy is made up of two components: mistakes to avoid and a process that works
Mistake to avoid
Many people complain there are wasting their time during the day.
They complain that they didn’t achieve something meaningful.
It is because they focus on time management ("building a schedule) .. They neglect The energy component. Energy management represents the level of focus you invest in doing something. Focus this energy on those activities which greatly impact your execution process: remembering, managing the flow, and solving problems (whatever tool you use)

Process
Step 1: what do you want to optimize for?
When you are trying to optimize for everything at the same time, you end up overwhelmed.
Optimizing for something means that you make a conscious choice to prioritize for a category of tasks. It means that you make the conscious decision to sacrifice other activities ( temporarily) when you don’t have enough resources. Once this choice is clear within your mind, you simplify your decision process.
there are 2 ways of defining priorities: Topic or type of tasks
Topic: mathematics, history, language
eg:, you can decide to prioritize "mathematic" because you are weak on it.
Type of tasks: remembering, practicing solving exercises
eg: I like to prioritize "practicing solving problems within exercises" when preparing for foreign languages exam instead of "studying vocabulary"

For more :<https://grillagemind.com/why-you-struggle-to-working-remotely-with-so-many-distractions/>

Step 2: set up deep work sessions for priority 1
Make "Working in the zone" a habit. this is the key to having an efficient organizational system. during the deep work sessions, you address your number 1 priorities: SOlving critical problem. for example, you can say: "every morning I will take 30 min to put myself in the right state in order to spend the next 2H to process mathematic exercises I am weak on"
For more: <https://grillagemind.com/dont-neglect-little-things-average-work-and-improvistion/>
Step 3; set up average sessions for other priorities
Don’t neglect to allocate time for anything that doesn’t belong to priorities number 1
You should aim to be “good enough” at anything that doesn’t belong to priorities number 1.


When this is ok, you can now find Tools to implement " THE METHOD" you designed for you.

Courage. Don't Back down. You will be making progress at revising that helps you to move the needle.
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gyuigygh
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Learn concept then do lots of questions while using specimen.

When I found it hard to start revising I would use an app that locks my phone for a few hours. Once you do this often enough studying will be habit and it will be harder to break than to continue (it gets easier). I would usually set it on the way home from skl coz otherwise I would get home , tell myself I'm gonna go on my phone for 5 mins, then I wouldn't do anything all day. Set it for a bit longer than you plan to revise for coz you are likely gonna procrastinate by walking around, cleaning... But eventually you will realise you might as well just start. (also, you can usally allow certain apps like Spotify if you still wanna listen to music from phone).

Active recall + spaced repetition + pomodoro technique.

Spaced repetition (as others have already mentioned) is really underrated. If done well you can do well without spending a lot of time revising. Personally, I make an excel chart for each subject where I put the topics header for each row and the date header for each column. Then whenever I revise I colour in the cells one of 3 colours: red if I tried to learn that topic but still didn't understand, orange if I made progress but had to use extra resources or look up answers and green if it was so easy I didnt learn anything new and didn't get anything wrong . Then I set some simple rules: if the cell is red I must try again the next day, if the cell is orange I can try again in around 3 to 7 days, and if its green I can try again in 2 or 3 weeks or if I've completed all the other topics. This method allows you to not missing anything and have a clear idea of what topics you're struggling with, it also should make your grades pretty consistent and it's really encouraging have a history of your progress and to see the cells for a topic morph from red or orange to green overtime. Also you can attach a little note on each cell and write a brief sentence or two about something you learnt that made the topic "click" with you and whether you covered the whole topic or not in that session. Then when you have an exam coming up you can quickly go back and look through these points. A chart gives you a lot more freedom than a timetable as you don't have a set subject to study, but you still will know what you need to study by looking at the chart. Still keep a set time of day when you should revise and also know exaclty which websites and textbooks you will use. You can use whatver other stuff you want like flashcards on top of this but maintaining a timetable like this as the root of all my revision was helpful for me.

As for pomodoro technique, just take a 5 min break every 25 mins or half an hour. If you find having this break makes you go back to your phone and get lost in the Internet for hours then instead just listen to music and close your eyes for 5 mins or walk around or do exercise. You must take this break at least every half an hour, even if you feel you don't need it.

You can search more about active recall if you want but essentially: once you've learnt the concept and done a few questions you should refrain from looking back at notes or textbooks or answers every other time you come back to do questions until you've had a go at the question.

Lastly, once you're more comfortable with topics you can start setting a stopwatch for the questions and try and do it in required time (usually a mark per min). If you have a friend who is around your level and you like group studying then get a booklet of questions and each set a stopwatch on phone for each question to see who can do it faster (this is sorta fun for subjects with short questions like maths) .

I don't listen to music when learning a concept (I've tried and it just takes much longer) but I usally listen to music when doing short questions (usally for maths) that I'm already somewhat comfortable with.

When it come to a real exam I usally do all the questions that have straightforward procedures much faster than the required time and then spend a decent chunk of exam on a few of the tricky questions. If you find you don't have enough time to answer attempt every question in the vast majority of your exams then there is a clear issue, either with time management during exam or with ur revision method.

Also be careful of diet. If you eat too much, especially carbs and sugary drinks then you might feel sleepy. Try not to eat a big meal before revising. Also stick to water or smoothies (anything that's light and not sugary) until after you're done revising for the day. If you really like caffeine/coffee and regularly drink it that's fine, personally I gave it up and my energy levels were more consistent throughout the day. But it takes a week or two for body to adjust. Basically, don't suddenly start or stop drinking caffeine before an exam as, if your body is not used to it, you will be too alert to think straight or too tired to think.

When it come to exam season aim to go through the entirety of all ur subjects a few weeks before exam season using specimen. Then during exam season you go everything you need for each specific test. This way you've gone through things at least twice, the first time allows you to make sure you've done everything and identify and real weak points so you have no surprises of things you don't understand during exam season
. Then in exam season you will be pretty much stress free as you won't be learning anything new when revising, just going over things.

If there are some facts that you just have to remeber then make some mnemonic or smthn to remeber it. The weirder the better. This is especially useful just before an exam if u haven't revised enough and need need to quickly commit those facts to memory.

You don't need to revise a lot to do well, it's more consistency, try to colour in at least one cell a day (even if it means just doing one question and colouring it red or orange or making a note) this way you will avoid breaking habit and often its a good trick to tell yourself "I am only going to one question, no more" coz if you've gotten up to sit at your desk then you will likely do more than one question, coz starting revision and breaking the procrastination cycle is the hardest.

Sleep well too, no point revising too late at night.

You will probably have a few times where you just give up for a whole week or two without filling in any cells, but as long as you get back up then it's fine.

Also, when you question yourself as to whether you should start working or continue procrastinating a bit more, it might be also helpful to be aware that pretty much every other student in the country is probably having the same thought. The majority of those students will choose to continue procrastinating, the rest will actually start revising. Which category do you want to be in?
Last edited by gyuigygh; 2 weeks ago
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