L.E.A.H
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I am interested in becoming a SEMH teacher in a primary school as this is an area I am interested and passionate about, however, I love working and teaching young children (EYFS currently) and I can not decide if I would like to teach children in a classroom focusing on the EYFS and KS1 or in smaller groups as a SEMH Teacher.

I know for both you are required to have QTS so I was wondering if it was possible to teach as a 'normal' teacher but still have SEMH responsibilities in the school because that would actually be my dream job.
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by L.E.A.H)
I am interested in becoming a SEMH teacher in a primary school as this is an area I am interested and passionate about, however, I love working and teaching young children (EYFS currently) and I can not decide if I would like to teach children in a classroom focusing on the EYFS and KS1 or in smaller groups as a SEMH Teacher.

I know for both you are required to have QTS so I was wondering if it was possible to teach as a 'normal' teacher but still have SEMH responsibilities in the school because that would actually be my dream job.
It is possible to train as a classroom teacher and then take on other responsibilities- in a mainstream school it would likely be SEND as well as SEMH, though.

You could also do a primary or EYFS PGCE with a specialism in SEND/inclusion/SEMH and still teach as a normal classroom teacher as well.
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bwilliams
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Hi

That's great that you've identified that passion - it's a passion I also have. To be honest, your best bet is to train as a primary school teacher anyway. Most SEMH positions will require you to have worked in mainstream and have QTS before you enter special school. While working in mainstream, you will gain experience working with children with SEMH or you could shadow the SENCO as SEMH is one of the four broad areas of special educational needs.

Are you looking at undergraduate training or postgraduate training and do you have a specific area in which you wish to train? I can point you in the direction of some course providers that either have SEN modules included or offer a SEN specialism.

Additionally, you'd benefit a lot of teaching mainstream before you go into SEMH. The inclusive ideal is obviously that children with SEMH needs remain in mainstream and if we were truly inclusive all children with SEMH needs would be in mainstream school. It's also worth bearing in mind that most SEMH schools work on referral only so they are either PRUs or alternative provisions. Maybe contact one to get some experience.
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bwilliams
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Also important to remember that SEMH is SEND. SEMH is one part of Special Educational Needs. So if you are looking to specialise in SEMH then it would be beneficial looking at the other broad areas of need too.
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L.E.A.H
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(Original post by bwilliams)
Hi

That's great that you've identified that passion - it's a passion I also have. To be honest, your best bet is to train as a primary school teacher anyway. Most SEMH positions will require you to have worked in mainstream and have QTS before you enter special school. While working in mainstream, you will gain experience working with children with SEMH or you could shadow the SENCO as SEMH is one of the four broad areas of special educational needs.

Are you looking at undergraduate training or postgraduate training and do you have a specific area in which you wish to train? I can point you in the direction of some course providers that either have SEN modules included or offer a SEN specialism.

Additionally, you'd benefit a lot of teaching mainstream before you go into SEMH. The inclusive ideal is obviously that children with SEMH needs remain in mainstream and if we were truly inclusive all children with SEMH needs would be in mainstream school. It's also worth bearing in mind that most SEMH schools work on referral only so they are either PRUs or alternative provisions. Maybe contact one to get some experience.
I will be looking at postgraduate as I already have my undergraduate degree in Young Children and Early Childhood and by the time I get round to applying I will have a masters degree in Education (Trauma-Informed Practice), which has a focus on children with ACE'S and SEMH needs. I would need to be trained in the North East as I would not be able to relocate for my training.

Yes please if you could point me in the right direction that would be great, I'm just trying to get as much information as possible at the moment. I currently work with children in a private day nursery but within it, we have several children who fall under the SEN category however I know it may be completely different within a school.
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L.E.A.H
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(Original post by bwilliams)
Also important to remember that SEMH is SEND. SEMH is one part of Special Educational Needs. So if you are looking to specialise in SEMH then it would be beneficial looking at the other broad areas of need.
I have some experience of working with children with SEND as part of my job as a nursery nurse, but I have also completed a few courses which are a Level 2 Certificate in Behaviour that Challenges in Children, Level 2 Certificate in Understanding Specific Learning Difficulties and a Level 2 Certificate in Understanding Autism. would these all help with my goal or would I need to do higher levels or something else?
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bwilliams
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(Original post by L.E.A.H)
I will be looking at postgraduate as I already have my undergraduate degree in Young Children and Early Childhood and by the time I get round to applying I will have a masters degree in Education (Trauma-Informed Practice), which has a focus on children with ACE'S and SEMH needs. I would need to be trained in the North East as I would not be able to relocate for my training.

Yes please if you could point me in the right direction that would be great, I'm just trying to get as much information as possible at the moment. I currently work with children in a private day nursery but within it, we have several children who fall under the SEN category however I know it may be completely different within a school.
Wow - this is a really good start. With your current qualifications, you are in a very good position. However, you now just need the PGCE - this will be essential as I said before, because it is so crucial to have mainstream experience before going into special. I'm currently mainstream primary and we have quite a few children with SEMH needs. It's sort of seen as trying to run before you can walk - you should definitely complete your NQT in mainstream.
Alternatively, you could seek school direct training with an SEMH school - I know some that do this. If you are clear you want to work in SEMH for the majority if your career this may be useful to you as you'd learn on the job in an SEMH school - beware that this may inhibit your chances of going back to mainstream if you wanted to in the future. I would really take the mainstream route first.

I don't know any specifics in the North East, unfortunately. Here is one that might take your interest - https://www.reading.ac.uk/ready-to-s...nal-needs.aspx
https://www.cumbria.ac.uk/study/cour...nd-disability/
https://www.bcu.ac.uk/courses/pgce-p...sm-sen-2020-21

It is not essential to take the SEN specialism at your PGCE - it would just help - so, don't panic if you can't. You already have your MA in trauma informed practice. Your knowledge of adverse childhood experiences will really help you.
(Original post by L.E.A.H)
I have some experience of working with children with SEND as part of my job as a nursery nurse, but I have also completed a few courses which are a Level 2 Certificate in Behaviour that Challenges in Children, Level 2 Certificate in Understanding Specific Learning Difficulties and a Level 2 Certificate in Understanding Autism. would these all help with my goal or would I need to do higher levels or something else?
These are fine and will look great! Here's another course you might be interested in for the future - this isn't a PGCE but it is aimed at people who are currently working with children with SEMH. This is accredited by SEBDA - take a look at the SEBDA website it should really interest you (Social Emotional and Behavioural difficulties association).
https://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/po...-difficulties/
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L.E.A.H
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(Original post by bwilliams)
Wow - this is a really good start. With your current qualifications, you are in a very good position. However, you now just need the PGCE - this will be essential as I said before, because it is so crucial to have mainstream experience before going into special. I'm currently mainstream primary and we have quite a few children with SEMH needs. It's sort of seen as trying to run before you can walk - you should definitely complete your NQT in mainstream.
Alternatively, you could seek school direct training with an SEMH school - I know some that do this. If you are clear you want to work in SEMH for the majority if your career this may be useful to you as you'd learn on the job in an SEMH school - beware that this may inhibit your chances of going back to mainstream if you wanted to in the future. I would really take the mainstream route first.

I don't know any specifics in the North East, unfortunately. Here is one that might take your interest - https://www.reading.ac.uk/ready-to-s...nal-needs.aspx
https://www.cumbria.ac.uk/study/cour...nd-disability/
https://www.bcu.ac.uk/courses/pgce-p...sm-sen-2020-21

It is not essential to take the SEN specialism at your PGCE - it would just help - so, don't panic if you can't. You already have your MA in trauma informed practice. Your knowledge of adverse childhood experiences will really help you.

These are fine and will look great! Here's another course you might be interested in for the future - this isn't a PGCE but it is aimed at people who are currently working with children with SEMH. This is accredited by SEBDA - take a look at the SEBDA website it should really interest you (Social Emotional and Behavioural difficulties association).
https://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/po...-difficulties/
That course looks quite good it's definitely something I would consider in the future.

Thank you for your advice and help, next step is to get onto a PCGE with QTS course! Fingers Crossed!
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