Studying a masters part time and working full time

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Pongo1
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I've been wanting to do a masters degree for a while now but I have a full-time job and I've always been hesitant about giving it up to study.

I'm wondering whether I can fit a part-time MA around my job. With the covid situation and working from home, and lectures being online at most uni's for at least the first term it actually feels more do-able.

Does anyone here juggle a part-time MA and full-time job? Does it work?

I'm also wondering with part-time course do you have separate classes or do you just attend fewer than the full-time students?
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Muserock
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I'm starting a masters degree in September. I plan to work full time and study (doing supply teaching so they'll be times when I might be working less than full time). My masters is all online so I can fit studying around my day.


I did my undergraduate degree online whilst holding down a full time job which was manageable. For that I did one module per semester and I think it will be the same for my masters.

I think how uni's structure their timetable will vary depending on the university and the subject. For the campus students, a lot of the modules are in evenings and weekends to fit around work for the part time students.
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Keele University
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(Original post by Pongo1)
I've been wanting to do a masters degree for a while now but I have a full-time job and I've always been hesitant about giving it up to study.

I'm wondering whether I can fit a part-time MA around my job. With the covid situation and working from home, and lectures being online at most uni's for at least the first term it actually feels more do-able.

Does anyone here juggle a part-time MA and full-time job? Does it work?

I'm also wondering with part-time course do you have separate classes or do you just attend fewer than the full-time students?
What you can juggle in terms of workload very much depends upon both the MA and the person I think.

I studied my MA in English Literature full-time and then worked three part-time jobs (two were casual contracts with flexible hours, one was a Saturday job with occasional holiday/sick cover). I was probably working about 8 - 15 hours a week and I found that perfectly do-able, although because of the flexible nature of my jobs, I was able to drop hours when I got busy with university assignments which was really helpful.

Part-time MA's tend to involve classes on just one or two days a week - most universities try to group their MA classes together as they know that many postgraduate students (especially those studying part-time) will have work or childcare/family commitments. Due to the complexities of timetabling it isn't always possible but many aspects of MA study (such as dissertation tutorials) are one-to-one and can therefore be flexed a little more easily around your work commitments than undergraduate lectures and seminars.

At Keele, our part-time MA students were in the same classes as our full-time students on my English course - they just didn't attend all of the classes as they were taking the degree over two years instead of one. However that might be different at other universities - and can even vary from course to course depending on cohort size and on how the university structure their full-time and part-time study programmes. If you're unsure how your university approaches this, contact the departmental administrators or the course lead and they should be able to tell you. They'll also be able to advise as to how much time each week you would be expected to set aside for your studies.

It's certainly possible to hold down a full-time job and study for your MA - I've known quite a few people who have obtained qualifications this way - but it is hard work and it helps to have a supportive employer. Expect to have to devote some evenings and weekends to studying in order to fit your MA workload around your job - and consider saving some of your annual leave to use when assignments are due.

Hope that helps!

Amy
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