Dododododo
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Hey,

So I'm in year 10 and was thinking about future careers. It's really brought a lot of stress to me because my friends all seem to know more or less what they want to do, and my parents are pressuring me to be a doctor (as expected aha), but I really have no clue. Spoke to my counsellor about it, she was really helpful and said that it'll help me be more open minded when it comes to opportunities, which is definitely true. However, I've recently really leaned towards teaching. I'm not sure if this is just because lots of my role models are teachers, or if it's because it's the only thing I see - when I see a doctor I like, I want to be a doctor etc etc. Teaching seems very appealing to me, I've always been kind of a "work with people younger than you" person. In primary, thank to the bullying, I often volunteered at the nursery during breaks so I was safe from the bullying (under literal constant supervision), and I'm currently volunteering at a primary school (but just because I want to).

I guess the things that are stopping me from fully aiming for this is
1) Payment
2) My parents would be so disappointed
3) Idk what I would teach, I guess I'd work that out with time
4) I'm not sure if I have the patience, again, that might change over time
5) Workload and showing authority, not sure if I can do that yet

There's more but I can't exactly think rn lmao
I've been watching videos about teacher training and it all interests me.
I don't know if I should set my standards "so low" because people usually aim "higher" than a teacher, like a doctor or engineer, but I don't know.

I also want to add that there's another factor that's been stressing me out quite a bit. I know someone who's essentially set on being a teacher; it's her dream job aside from something else she's interested in. She's so determined, and she often brags about her experience babysitting and teaching and her ability to "turn around" bad behaved kids, and how she's always willing to listen to them etc etc. I don't know, but I often wish I had that. Firstly, I've used every experience opportunity I've had so far (and I'm only in Year 10, so not that many), and I'm trying my best, but I guess she's made me feel really incompetent to being a teacher if I do decide to do that. It's quite difficult when you finally find something you're interested in from your heart. To be a good teacher, to be one that TRULY makes a difference, do you have to have that determination right away?

In Year 10, we begin the whole career thing, so I'll have some more ideas then, but I'm just wondering if anyone has any insight/experience to this.

Thanks and have a good day
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bluebeetle
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(Original post by Dododododo)
Hey,

So I'm in year 10 and was thinking about future careers. It's really brought a lot of stress to me because my friends all seem to know more or less what they want to do, and my parents are pressuring me to be a doctor (as expected aha), but I really have no clue. Spoke to my counsellor about it, she was really helpful and said that it'll help me be more open minded when it comes to opportunities, which is definitely true. However, I've recently really leaned towards teaching. I'm not sure if this is just because lots of my role models are teachers, or if it's because it's the only thing I see - when I see a doctor I like, I want to be a doctor etc etc. Teaching seems very appealing to me, I've always been kind of a "work with people younger than you" person. In primary, thank to the bullying, I often volunteered at the nursery during breaks so I was safe from the bullying (under literal constant supervision), and I'm currently volunteering at a primary school (but just because I want to).

I guess the things that are stopping me from fully aiming for this is
1) Payment
2) My parents would be so disappointed
3) Idk what I would teach, I guess I'd work that out with time
4) I'm not sure if I have the patience, again, that might change over time
5) Workload and showing authority, not sure if I can do that yet

There's more but I can't exactly think rn lmao
I've been watching videos about teacher training and it all interests me.
I don't know if I should set my standards "so low" because people usually aim "higher" than a teacher, like a doctor or engineer, but I don't know.

In Year 10, we begin the whole career thing, so I'll have some more ideas then, but I'm just wondering if anyone has any insight/experience to this.

Thanks and have a good day
Obviously, most people here won't agree that teaching is a low aspiration, but that being said, it's an attitude you'll definitely encounter. Best to ignore comments like that from people who have very little idea of what goes into teaching. There are teachers at my school who were previously working engineers who then decided they would rather teach, and others who have PhDs and the like but still decided teaching was a worthy career for them.

I'd say in year 10, you can easily keep your options open while still preparing for teaching as a possibility. When I was your age, I didn't have a strong aspiration to become a teacher, but I did some work experience in a primary school and also was a young leader in my local Guides group, both of which I think helped me see some of the benefits and drawbacks of working with young people. At this stage, I would worry less about the specific logistics and more about getting bits of relevant experience where you can, and you said you've been volunteering in a primary school, which sounds fantastic! Even if you don't end up being a teacher, there are many careers working in education / working with young people that aren't teaching.

To address some of your concerns about having enough patience, dealing with the workload, and showing authority, I'd say these are all things I wouldn't have been confident with at your age! Just knowing that these are skills you may need means that you can work on developing them over time.

Best of luck!
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EierVonSatan
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(Original post by Dododododo)
Hey,

So I'm in year 10 and was thinking about future careers. It's really brought a lot of stress to me because my friends all seem to know more or less what they want to do, and my parents are pressuring me to be a doctor (as expected aha), but I really have no clue. Spoke to my counsellor about it, she was really helpful and said that it'll help me be more open minded when it comes to opportunities, which is definitely true. However, I've recently really leaned towards teaching. I'm not sure if this is just because lots of my role models are teachers, or if it's because it's the only thing I see - when I see a doctor I like, I want to be a doctor etc etc. Teaching seems very appealing to me, I've always been kind of a "work with people younger than you" person. In primary, thank to the bullying, I often volunteered at the nursery during breaks so I was safe from the bullying (under literal constant supervision), and I'm currently volunteering at a primary school (but just because I want to).

I guess the things that are stopping me from fully aiming for this is
1) Payment
2) My parents would be so disappointed
3) Idk what I would teach, I guess I'd work that out with time
4) I'm not sure if I have the patience, again, that might change over time
5) Workload and showing authority, not sure if I can do that yet

There's more but I can't exactly think rn lmao
I've been watching videos about teacher training and it all interests me.
I don't know if I should set my standards "so low" because people usually aim "higher" than a teacher, like a doctor or engineer, but I don't know.

In Year 10, we begin the whole career thing, so I'll have some more ideas then, but I'm just wondering if anyone has any insight/experience to this.

Thanks and have a good day
You are very young to be thinking about teaching :yes:

If you want to go into secondary teaching, you need to find a subject you are really interested in. Then you need to be sure that you want to work with young people, which is where a bit of experience helps.

It's completely normal to be unsure what you want to do in the future but I'd encourage you to try something else before teaching. I started to consider teaching at about 25 and I think I certainly benefitted from going into teaching a bit later. I went into teaching a few years later. However, people are going to have different opinions on this!
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TSR Professor
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The “main mission or aim of a teacher” is simple. It is to make a positive difference to the lives of young people.

End of, pretty much. It’s an important job, and a hard one. It’s a “mission or aim” that cannot easily - perhaps at all - be measured, and is never featured in the metrics against which teachers are judged in their professional careers. So if you look at most teacher appraisals, they will be focused on systems and how well the teacher has followed them.

But making a difference. That’s what it is about.

Make a difference to individuals. Make a difference to the world.
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Dododododo
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(Original post by bluebeetle)
Obviously, most people here won't agree that teaching is a low aspiration, but that being said, it's an attitude you'll definitely encounter. Best to ignore comments like that from people who have very little idea of what goes into teaching. There are teachers at my school who were previously working engineers who then decided they would rather teach, and others who have PhDs and the like but still decided teaching was a worthy career for them.

I'd say in year 10, you can easily keep your options open while still preparing for teaching as a possibility. When I was your age, I didn't have a strong aspiration to become a teacher, but I did some work experience in a primary school and also was a young leader in my local Guides group, both of which I think helped me see some of the benefits and drawbacks of working with young people. At this stage, I would worry less about the specific logistics and more about getting bits of relevant experience where you can, and you said you've been volunteering in a primary school, which sounds fantastic! Even if you don't end up being a teacher, there are many careers working in education / working with young people that aren't teaching.

To address some of your concerns about having enough patience, dealing with the workload, and showing authority, I'd say these are all things I wouldn't have been confident with at your age! Just knowing that these are skills you may need means that you can work on developing them over time.

Best of luck!
Yes, I've come across so many people who think teaching is a low aspiration. My favourite teacher once told me that a student told her "I'm not going to insult my intelligence by becoming a teacher" and told us how much it hurt her. Made me think about how I might feel hearing that from my family in the future if I do decide to do this, but yes I will ignore them and see what's best for me. And yes, I definitely will take your advice and look to see if there is more experience I can get, which will probably help in any career I end up getting. Thank you!
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Dododododo
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(Original post by EierVonSatan)
You are very young to be thinking about teaching :yes:

If you want to go into secondary teaching, you need to find a subject you are really interested in. Then you need to be sure that you want to work with young people, which is where a bit of experience helps.

It's completely normal to be unsure what you want to do in the future but I'd encourage you to try something else before teaching. I started to consider teaching at about 25 and I think I certainly benefitted from going into teaching a bit later. I went into teaching a few years later. However, people are going to have different opinions on this!
Just want to clarify that I'm thinking about teaching in the future, definitely not now (is that even possible?). The things that concern me are that I'm not really sure quiet yet about the details, about what subject I'd teach, although I know for sure that I'll be looking for more experience in the near future. I also agree with you on teaching later, in the sense that I can see that some of the younger, newer teachers at school are often....how do I put it....lacking experience? lmao i dont know, I'm just so unsure right now that I don't think it makes sense for me to go into detail, but thank you for the advice!
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Dododododo
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(Original post by TSR Professor)
The “main mission or aim of a teacher” is simple. It is to make a positive difference to the lives of young people.

End of, pretty much. It’s an important job, and a hard one. It’s a “mission or aim” that cannot easily - perhaps at all - be measured, and is never featured in the metrics against which teachers are judged in their professional careers. So if you look at most teacher appraisals, they will be focused on systems and how well the teacher has followed them.

But making a difference. That’s what it is about.

Make a difference to individuals. Make a difference to the world.
Yes! I can't express how much I agree with this, and it's really one of the reasons I'm interested in teaching. This probably is cliche, but teachers have had suchhh a massive impact in my life, especially now, and I can't think of a reason why I wouldn't want to help other people in the way teachers have helped me. (Your response would make an excellent Thank You card for my teachers, I might steal it lmao). It's really sad how the role of teachers are so judged, and it doesn't really make sense why. Even my grandma was a teacher, but my family still look down on me potentially aspiring to be one. Thank you for your message, it's really inspired me
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gjd800
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Thing with teaching is that it is always there, so you need not make a decision now (or even soon!)

I'm in my 30s and just starting ITT, but I have been teaching in one form or another for the past 5 years ish (and I hold a PhD). It's not something to be leapt into, but you have plenty of time
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EierVonSatan
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(Original post by Dododododo)
Just want to clarify that I'm thinking about teaching in the future, definitely not now (is that even possible?). The things that concern me are that I'm not really sure quiet yet about the details, about what subject I'd teach, although I know for sure that I'll be looking for more experience in the near future. I also agree with you on teaching later, in the sense that I can see that some of the younger, newer teachers at school are often....how do I put it....lacking experience? lmao i dont know, I'm just so unsure right now that I don't think it makes sense for me to go into detail, but thank you for the advice!
I know what you mean't, don't worry What I mean, is aim to be a teacher at the earliest possible oppurtunity...a path you could be starting at 17 when applying to university. Good luck, anyway.
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Dododododo
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(Original post by gjd800)
Thing with teaching is that it is always there, so you need not make a decision now (or even soon!)

I'm in my 30s and just starting ITT, but I have been teaching in one form or another for the past 5 years ish (and I hold a PhD). It's not something to be leapt into, but you have plenty of time
Yes that's very true! Will I need to start training at a certain age/level "just in case", or is it just whenever? (I think I need to do a bit more research, what do I need to have in order to train?)
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Dododododo
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(Original post by EierVonSatan)
I know what you mean't, don't worry What I mean, is aim to be a teacher at the earliest possible oppurtunity...a path you could be starting at 17 when applying to university.
Oh right! (Sorry) Again, is there a level/age I need to be at in order to start "preparing"?
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EierVonSatan
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(Original post by Dododododo)
Oh right! (Sorry) Again, is there a level/age I need to be at in order to start "preparing"?
Well, this is were things get complicated There are lots of different ways into teaching, confusingly so! Essentially, no matter at what stage of education/life you are there is a path to get into teaching. I won't bore you with every possibility but most people either:

1) A do an education degree that gives them QTS (qualified teacher status) - more common for primary teachers

or

2) Do a degree in a subject (like maths, history etc), followed by 1 year 'conversion' course that gives them QTS - more common for secondary teachers

So if you want to do primary teaching, as soon as possible, then you can apply to do option 1 when you apply for university in year 13.
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Dododododo
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(Original post by EierVonSatan)
Well, this is were things get complicated There are lots of different ways into teaching, confusingly so! Essentially, no matter at what stage of education/life you are there is a path to get into teaching. I won't bore you with every possibility but most people either:

1) A do an education degree that gives them QTS (qualified teacher status) - more common for primary teachers

or

2) Do a degree in a subject (like maths, history etc), followed by 1 year 'conversion' course that gives them QTS - more common for secondary teachers

So if you want to do primary teaching, as soon as possible, then you can apply to do option 1 when you apply for university in year 13.
Ughghhg it's so annoying because as soon as I read this I can FEEL that I'm genuinely interested, so now I can't even fake to myself that I'm not interested in seeing if teaching is an opportunity. I also didn't realise that it was so close, year 13 isn't too far away.

I'm just thinking about the primary teachers I've had and how t e r r i b l e they were with pastoral care and things, and also the primary teachers at the school I volunteer at because they seem so dead in the inside - must be difficult taking care of small excitable children.
Something for me to think about - seems a bit less confusing that I thought it would be but of course I think you've just summarised it consciely lmao

And it's nice to know that there's always a path to get into teaching, thank you
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(Original post by Dododododo)
Hey,

So I'm in year 10 and was thinking about future careers. It's really brought a lot of stress to me because my friends all seem to know more or less what they want to do, and my parents are pressuring me to be a doctor (as expected aha), but I really have no clue. Spoke to my counsellor about it, she was really helpful and said that it'll help me be more open minded when it comes to opportunities, which is definitely true. However, I've recently really leaned towards teaching. I'm not sure if this is just because lots of my role models are teachers, or if it's because it's the only thing I see - when I see a doctor I like, I want to be a doctor etc etc. Teaching seems very appealing to me, I've always been kind of a "work with people younger than you" person. In primary, thank to the bullying, I often volunteered at the nursery during breaks so I was safe from the bullying (under literal constant supervision), and I'm currently volunteering at a primary school (but just because I want to).

I guess the things that are stopping me from fully aiming for this is
1) Payment
2) My parents would be so disappointed
3) Idk what I would teach, I guess I'd work that out with time
4) I'm not sure if I have the patience, again, that might change over time
5) Workload and showing authority, not sure if I can do that yet

There's more but I can't exactly think rn lmao
I've been watching videos about teacher training and it all interests me.
I don't know if I should set my standards "so low" because people usually aim "higher" than a teacher, like a doctor or engineer, but I don't know.

I also want to add that there's another factor that's been stressing me out quite a bit. I know someone who's essentially set on being a teacher; it's her dream job aside from something else she's interested in. She's so determined, and she often brags about her experience babysitting and teaching and her ability to "turn around" bad behaved kids, and how she's always willing to listen to them etc etc. I don't know, but I often wish I had that. Firstly, I've used every experience opportunity I've had so far (and I'm only in Year 10, so not that many), and I'm trying my best, but I guess she's made me feel really incompetent to being a teacher if I do decide to do that. It's quite difficult when you finally find something you're interested in from your heart. To be a good teacher, to be one that TRULY makes a difference, do you have to have that determination right away?

In Year 10, we begin the whole career thing, so I'll have some more ideas then, but I'm just wondering if anyone has any insight/experience to this.

Thanks and have a good day
Hi there,

TRUST me when I say that it's totally fine that you don't know what you quite want to do yet. The majority of people swap and change career paths throughout their lifetime as their experiences and knowledge grows and their interests and values change. This is completely normal and if anything I wouldn't say it's wise for someone of your age to be so set on what they want to do when they don't even know about the majority of careers out there!

I didn't know what I wanted to do really so I just went for subjects that I enjoyed. It makes sense to me that the career you'll be happiest in will probably be one that's somewhat linked to the areas of study that you enjoy and find interesting. I maintained this attitude all the way up until I completed my Masters degree. I studied Geography because 1) It genuinely interested me 2) I was good at it 3) It's a highly adaptable subject and as a result can send you down more career paths than I even know about.

I eventually decided to go into teaching because I wanted to contribute more to the world around me and trust me when I say I would never have imagined myself as a teacher, even when I was mid-way through my undergraduate degree at university. My teachers at school were nasty and emotionally abusive and that's what I thought teachers were. I'm proud to say that I'm a teacher that tries their best to install confidence in the young people I teach. Some people don't respect Teaching as much as they should but I do believe that's because their interaction and knowledge of them mostly falls back to their own experiences when they were at school. I think a lot of people also hold the psychology that teaching is a profession beneath others as they eventually left their teachers behind and progress on with their lives when leaving school. Since qualifying as a teacher I've gained a lot of respect from a wide variety of people and people are always impressed by it when I tell them as it demonstrates someone with a lot of perseverance, skill and strength. When they find out I'm a secondary teacher on top I get a lot of 'Yikes.' 'I could never.' 'How do you cope.' remarks haha.

"I guess the things that are stopping me from fully aiming for this is
1) Payment
2) My parents would be so disappointed
3) Idk what I would teach, I guess I'd work that out with time
4) I'm not sure if I have the patience, again, that might change over time
5) Workload and showing authority, not sure if I can do that yet"

1) Teachers aren't paid as much as other professionals at the start of their career, no, but this is soon changing with government incentives to raise the minimum starting salary. We also have fantastic job security and one of the best pensions you can get.
2) It's ok for me to say this because I had generally supportive parents who only really wanted me to get a university education rather than study a specific subject, but genuinely your parents aren't leading your life, you are. Once you go to university and start being more independent and working towards building your life and career why does their opinion matter? You will not succeed pursuing something you despise and pleasing your parents won't make a life of misery worth it.
3) Don't worry about this one - for the most part you don't need to study a subject that you would eventually want to teach. Yes, you may have to take a summer transition course but you don't need to have studied a Biology degree to become a biology teacher.
4) People change, their interests transform and their characteristics develop in different ways. I know people who 'knew' they wanted to be a teacher when we were in Year. 9, studied an education related UG degree and got to the PGCE and couldn't cope.
5) You're still figuring out who you are, this is completely normal. Again, I was always very shy, not very confident etc.


Hope some of my feedback helps. Just please keep your doors open. There are so SO many opportunities to swap and change directions throughout your life. Do what interests you and makes you happy
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username5359312
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(Original post by EierVonSatan)
Well, this is were things get complicated There are lots of different ways into teaching, confusingly so! Essentially, no matter at what stage of education/life you are there is a path to get into teaching. I won't bore you with every possibility but most people either:

1) A do an education degree that gives them QTS (qualified teacher status) - more common for primary teachers

or

2) Do a degree in a subject (like maths, history etc), followed by 1 year 'conversion' course that gives them QTS - more common for secondary teachers

So if you want to do primary teaching, as soon as possible, then you can apply to do option 1 when you apply for university in year 13.
Whilst this is true, I just wanted to take the opportunity to highlight to the OP that undertaking an education degree at UG might limit potential career opportunities. What if you want to move direction or decide working with children isn't for you? A subject at degree level would open more doors.
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TheMandalorian
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I am probably going to get a lot of hate for this but I always tell people who are thinking of teaching to think about it very carefully. Teaching is a difficult job. Your salary is unlikely to increase unless you take on leadership responsibilities. There isn’t much room for progression in teaching. Having a good work-life balance is possible but you have to really work hard for it e.g working through lunch breaks. Also depends on where you work as well.

If you are genuinely passionate about education and helping young people then I’d say go for teaching. I’ve been teaching for a couple of years now and have decided to leave. The work-life balance is simply not possible for me in teaching.
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remussjhj01
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(Original post by Dododododo)
Hey,

So I'm in year 10 and was thinking about future careers. It's really brought a lot of stress to me because my friends all seem to know more or less what they want to do, and my parents are pressuring me to be a doctor (as expected aha), but I really have no clue. Spoke to my counsellor about it, she was really helpful and said that it'll help me be more open minded when it comes to opportunities, which is definitely true. However, I've recently really leaned towards teaching. I'm not sure if this is just because lots of my role models are teachers, or if it's because it's the only thing I see - when I see a doctor I like, I want to be a doctor etc etc. Teaching seems very appealing to me, I've always been kind of a "work with people younger than you" person. In primary, thank to the bullying, I often volunteered at the nursery during breaks so I was safe from the bullying (under literal constant supervision), and I'm currently volunteering at a primary school (but just because I want to).

I guess the things that are stopping me from fully aiming for this is
1) Payment
2) My parents would be so disappointed
3) Idk what I would teach, I guess I'd work that out with time
4) I'm not sure if I have the patience, again, that might change over time
5) Workload and showing authority, not sure if I can do that yet

There's more but I can't exactly think rn lmao
I've been watching videos about teacher training and it all interests me.
I don't know if I should set my standards "so low" because people usually aim "higher" than a teacher, like a doctor or engineer, but I don't know.

I also want to add that there's another factor that's been stressing me out quite a bit. I know someone who's essentially set on being a teacher; it's her dream job aside from something else she's interested in. She's so determined, and she often brags about her experience babysitting and teaching and her ability to "turn around" bad behaved kids, and how she's always willing to listen to them etc etc. I don't know, but I often wish I had that. Firstly, I've used every experience opportunity I've had so far (and I'm only in Year 10, so not that many), and I'm trying my best, but I guess she's made me feel really incompetent to being a teacher if I do decide to do that. It's quite difficult when you finally find something you're interested in from your heart. To be a good teacher, to be one that TRULY makes a difference, do you have to have that determination right away?

In Year 10, we begin the whole career thing, so I'll have some more ideas then, but I'm just wondering if anyone has any insight/experience to this.

Thanks and have a good day
Hey, so I'm aiming to be a teacher too. About to start my undergraduate, and will do a PGCE after this. I was 14 when I decided I wanted to be a teacher. At the time I was unsure between history and music, but I've now decided to do music.
1). The salary isn't GREAT, but it does go up each year and they are planning on increasing the salary over a few years (not sure how much I trust the tories, but fingers crossed).
2). Honestly, ignore your parents. It's your life and you should do what you think you'd enjoy/what would make them happy. My parents weren't very happy when I first told them and tbh, I think they're still not thrilled and do keep saying I should be a uni lecturer, but I think they know I'm sure what I want to do now.
3). As I said before, I wasn't sure when I was in year 10 either. I wasn't 100% until I was at college. It'll come with time.
4). Patience isn't as bad as you'd think. I thought I was going to have a really short temper and get really annoyed having to explain things over and over, but I didn't, because you can see they're trying really hard to get it, and they do WANT to get it.
5). Workload IS tough, but obviously doable. The hardest part will be your PGCE year. The discipline/authority side will probably not be an issue until your PGCE year. I would aim to get as much school experience as possible so you can see how teachers do things when a kid acts out, that way you'll be somewhat prepared.
If you're a good teacher, you WILL make a difference. I still remember my favourite teachers and certain things they said to me.
You've still got a while, and you can change your mind. I would advise doing your work experience in a school if possible at the level and 1-2 of the subjects you want to teach. That's what I did and it was really beneficial.
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EierVonSatan
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(Original post by TheMandalorian)
I am probably going to get a lot of hate for this but I always tell people who are thinking of teaching to think about it very carefully. Teaching is a difficult job. Your salary is unlikely to increase unless you take on leadership responsibilities. There isn’t much room for progression in teaching. Having a good work-life balance is possible but you have to really work hard for it e.g working through lunch breaks. Also depends on where you work as well.

If you are genuinely passionate about education and helping young people then I’d say go for teaching. I’ve been teaching for a couple of years now and have decided to leave. The work-life balance is simply not possible for me in teaching.
Thanks for posting this. It's important to have all the full range of expierences, so that people can make up their own minds.

I certainly had a rough first few years in teaching and seriously considered leaving. If I didn't change to a better school, I would have left teaching too. All of my friends who started teaching before me, have also left.
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Dododododo
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(Original post by TheMandalorian)
I am probably going to get a lot of hate for this but I always tell people who are thinking of teaching to think about it very carefully. Teaching is a difficult job. Your salary is unlikely to increase unless you take on leadership responsibilities. There isn’t much room for progression in teaching. Having a good work-life balance is possible but you have to really work hard for it e.g working through lunch breaks. Also depends on where you work as well.

If you are genuinely passionate about education and helping young people then I’d say go for teaching. I’ve been teaching for a couple of years now and have decided to leave. The work-life balance is simply not possible for me in teaching.
Hmm, this is something I'm really thinking about - especially because if it doesn't work for me, I won't have my parents' (emotional) support and it might screw me up. Maybe if i continue finding more work and school experience it'll be easier for me to see if it'll work for me. If you leave teaching, what happens next? Do you just go and find another job? (Is that obvious im not sure).

Thank you for sharing your experience
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(Original post by username5359312)
Hi there,

TRUST me when I say that it's totally fine that you don't know what you quite want to do yet. The majority of people swap and change career paths throughout their lifetime as their experiences and knowledge grows and their interests and values change. This is completely normal and if anything I wouldn't say it's wise for someone of your age to be so set on what they want to do when they don't even know about the majority of careers out there!

I didn't know what I wanted to do really so I just went for subjects that I enjoyed. It makes sense to me that the career you'll be happiest in will probably be one that's somewhat linked to the areas of study that you enjoy and find interesting. I maintained this attitude all the way up until I completed my Masters degree. I studied Geography because 1) It genuinely interested me 2) I was good at it 3) It's a highly adaptable subject and as a result can send you down more career paths than I even know about.

I eventually decided to go into teaching because I wanted to contribute more to the world around me and trust me when I say I would never have imagined myself as a teacher, even when I was mid-way through my undergraduate degree at university. My teachers at school were nasty and emotionally abusive and that's what I thought teachers were. I'm proud to say that I'm a teacher that tries their best to install confidence in the young people I teach. Some people don't respect Teaching as much as they should but I do believe that's because their interaction and knowledge of them mostly falls back to their own experiences when they were at school. I think a lot of people also hold the psychology that teaching is a profession beneath others as they eventually left their teachers behind and progress on with their lives when leaving school. Since qualifying as a teacher I've gained a lot of respect from a wide variety of people and people are always impressed by it when I tell them as it demonstrates someone with a lot of perseverance, skill and strength. When they find out I'm a secondary teacher on top I get a lot of 'Yikes.' 'I could never.' 'How do you cope.' remarks haha.

"I guess the things that are stopping me from fully aiming for this is
1) Payment
2) My parents would be so disappointed
3) Idk what I would teach, I guess I'd work that out with time
4) I'm not sure if I have the patience, again, that might change over time
5) Workload and showing authority, not sure if I can do that yet"

1) Teachers aren't paid as much as other professionals at the start of their career, no, but this is soon changing with government incentives to raise the minimum starting salary. We also have fantastic job security and one of the best pensions you can get.
2) It's ok for me to say this because I had generally supportive parents who only really wanted me to get a university education rather than study a specific subject, but genuinely your parents aren't leading your life, you are. Once you go to university and start being more independent and working towards building your life and career why does their opinion matter? You will not succeed pursuing something you despise and pleasing your parents won't make a life of misery worth it.
3) Don't worry about this one - for the most part you don't need to study a subject that you would eventually want to teach. Yes, you may have to take a summer transition course but you don't need to have studied a Biology degree to become a biology teacher.
4) People change, their interests transform and their characteristics develop in different ways. I know people who 'knew' they wanted to be a teacher when we were in Year. 9, studied an education related UG degree and got to the PGCE and couldn't cope.
5) You're still figuring out who you are, this is completely normal. Again, I was always very shy, not very confident etc.


Hope some of my feedback helps. Just please keep your doors open. There are so SO many opportunities to swap and change directions throughout your life. Do what interests you and makes you happy
Thank you so much - this was so helpful!
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