Why does voltage stay the same when current splits up?

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moomin valley
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on different paths of the circuit?
V=IR so at measured points in the different wires where current is different why is voltage the same?

Also, in a series circuit with several lamps, I don't understand what is actually happening to the electrons flowing. the voltage drops after each lamp, and successive lamps may get dimmer.. but the same current flows through all of them.. so the same number of electrons are flowing through all of them.. what happened to the electrons when work is done?
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GeronimoFrankie
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Hi Moomin Valley,

Try and think of current as electrons moving through a wire (or marbles running down a tube), and voltage as the amount of energy each of those electrons has (or how fast the marbles are moving).

Parallel Circuits:
The number of electrons changes after a split because electrons cannot be in two places at once, they must either go through one wire or the other before arriving back at the battery. Hence the number of electrons will change depending on which wire you are looking at in a parallel circuit because they have more than one way they can go. The amount of energy each electron has (ie voltage) remains the same because it is attached to individual electrons not how many electrons there are. So even though the number of electrons running through a wire has gone down, the amount of energy each electron has, remains the same.

Series Circuits:
In a series circuit, there is only one wire for the electrons to move through. The wire can't just gain or lose any of the electrons inside it, so the number of electrons stays the same. However, as the electrons pass through each lamp they lose a little bit more of their energy (voltage) to each lamp before finally arriving back at the battery with no energy left (ie 0V). The more lamps you put into this circuit, the more the voltage is shared between the lamps and so the dimmer they get.

BBC Bitesize is always a good source for GCSE knowledge:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/guide...2p3/revision/1

Hope this helps,

Frankie
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