mc1927
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Personally I'm doing Secondary History PGCE. I've worked both in play groups with Junior age and Youth Clubs with Secondary age children and although I enjoyed both for different reasons, I find I can relate to and manage better with youny people who are of secondary age. Plus I love history and the idea of teaching phonics/maths /primary generally has never appealed to me. Yet the majority of people or trainees I speak to seem to lean towards doing primary. Why is that?
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gjd800
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Secondary because my subject specialism knowledge suits GCSE and A Level (and degree level...) and I'm good at giving the proverbial kick up the arse at exam times

I don't fancy the holistic nature of primary, and I'd find super young people overwhelming
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bluebeetle
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The reasons I enjoy secondary are:
- being able to focus on my specific subject
- the variety of having several different classes / year groups
- rarely have to teach content that doesn't interest me (though some parts of stats are a real bore)
- find it easier to relate to teenagers than younger children
- being in a department surrounded by people who also really enjoy maths
- very rarely having to deal with the chaos of school trips (just not my sort of thing at all)

Really though, I think it depends on the type of person. I suppose for a lot of people, primary school appeals for different reasons. A friend of mine who went the primary route told me she picked it in part because behaviour management is so much easier - which I'm sure is true for her, but I think I'd find it harder. She also liked that primary let her form close relationships over the course of the year with all students in the class. I also know a lot of the people from my training provider who did primary had degrees in psychology / sociology or similar things, so I think for many people, they've more of an interest in developing children's learning in a general sense rather than in a specific subject.
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username5359312
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I followed the Secondary path namely because in my general life I haven't had much interaction with young children and as a result I don't feel as comfortable around them. Alongside this, teenagers are going through a really difficult and strange life-transitionary period which I feel makes my interaction with students more interesting. They're not learning to read and write, they're building upon their knowledge, learning who they are, how to interact with others, trying to understand the world around them a little more.

In addition, I like being able to focus on my subject area and I feel quite privileged I'm able to immerse myself within the subject and share my passion and expertise to younger generations through my work. Additionally, I like interacting with a range of students and not being limited to one class for an academic year. I observed a primary school teacher for a few days ahead of applying to the PGCE and seeing the transition from reading to philosophy to multiplication to play just totally overwhelmed me!
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