bob fred
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I graduated last year with a BSc biochemistry. How can i get HCPC registered even though my course was not HCPC accredited? Also i have no experience in a hospital.

I've heard i can get this from the NHS scientist training program (STP) but that will take 4 year assuming i get accepted next year
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by fprischi)
Yes that is correct, with a BSc Biochemistry you need to do an NHS (or comparable) internship, create a portfolio and then apply for HCPC accreditation. Check profiles examples here so you can see what is missing in your CV to reach an accreditation: https://www.hcpc-uk.org/cpd/cpd-audi...mple-profiles/
This is incorrect. The OP has a lot to do before they can even consider doing their HCPC portfolio.

There is a wealth of information on this forum as I've answered similar posts to this many times.

(Original post by bob fred)
I graduated last year with a BSc biochemistry. How can i get HCPC registered even though my course was not HCPC accredited? Also i have no experience in a hospital.

I've heard i can get this from the NHS scientist training program (STP) but that will take 4 year assuming i get accepted next year
Firstly, the HCPC do not accredit courses. The HCPC manage the registration of various healthcare professionals. The IBMS accredit courses and your registration portfolio is to gain the IBMS Certificate of Competence, which allows you to apply to the HCPC for registration.

I'll add, I've assumed you're discussing Biomedical Scientist, but you've simply stated you want to be HCPC registered. The HCPC register people from 15 different professions, from Biomedical Scientists to social workers to chiropodists.

A Biochemistry degree is never going to be IBMS accredited. The purpose of IBMS accreditation is to show you have learnt various pathology-related topics. Biochemistry, microbiology, genetics, cellular pathology, haematology, transfusion etc. You've learnt one.

Therefore the next step you need to take is to hold an IBMS accredited undergraduate degree if you want to be a Biomedical Scientist. You need to apply to the IBMS to assess your degree, essentially see how far off being equivelent to an IBMS-accredited course it is. I believe degree assessment costs £290. They'll either provide you with a list of required top-up modules (most common), tell you your degree is actually sufficient or tell you your degree is that different you need to do a whole new degree.

Once you've done top-up modules, you need to get a Trainee Biomedical Scientist position. The issue is, most job specs for these require NHS experience, so you're going to have to work as a Band 2 Medical Laboratory Assistant first just to tick that box. I've had ex-colleagues who did this and worked as an MLA for a few months, started applying for Trainee jobs instantly. That's fine.

You mention the STP. That is to become a Clinical Scientist, which is also a HCPC registered profession. That is something you would be eligible to apply for. It is a complete different job to being a Biomedical Scientist. Some make the mistake of thinking a CS is just higher up. It's more office based so it comes down to what you want to do.
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bob fred
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Thanks for the insight and clearing my misunderstandings. My course included lots of genetics, cellular microbiology, and I took "Clinical haematology and blood science" as my optional module. Maybe i'll try that £290 degree assessment. These top-up modules, are they something you can do part-time?? There's a part-time phlebotomist (band 2) post advertised near where i live so i has considering applying to check the experience box.

Tbh i'm not entirely sure what i want to do but for sure it's something medical related and with some lab work since i enjoy that stuff. I wanted to try a BMS position since is sound like a mostly lab-based job. I'll have to do a bit of research on Clinical scientist and find out what this job is like. If it's quite investigative with problem solving I may take a liking to it. I'm not always a fan of office jobs but it depend on what i have to do.

I was considering STP to specialise in something for a masters but since i don't know what job i want, i'm putting it off and trying a few other jobs to figure out my likes and dislike, strength and weaknesses etc. The one thing i dread is getting specialising in a job I don't enjoy, and regretting my choices.
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by bob fred)
Thanks for the insight and clearing my misunderstandings. My course included lots of genetics, cellular microbiology, and I took "Clinical haematology and blood science" as my optional module. Maybe i'll try that £290 degree assessment. These top-up modules, are they something you can do part-time?? There's a part-time phlebotomist (band 2) post advertised near where i live so i has considering applying to check the experience box.

Tbh i'm not entirely sure what i want to do but for sure it's something medical related and with some lab work since i enjoy that stuff. I wanted to try a BMS position since is sound like a mostly lab-based job. I'll have to do a bit of research on Clinical scientist and find out what this job is like. If it's quite investigative with problem solving I may take a liking to it. I'm not always a fan of office jobs but it depend on what i have to do.

I was considering STP to specialise in something for a masters but since i don't know what job i want, i'm putting it off and trying a few other jobs to figure out my likes and dislike, strength and weaknesses etc. The one thing i dread is getting specialising in a job I don't enjoy, and regretting my choices.
It sounds like the IBMS will probably suggest top-up modules. You can take them whenever you want. They're not committing you to anyway. Nobody really does them full-time, and usually a module at a time so it's barely even part-time. Distance learning often.

You're considering a Band 2 role. You can do top-up modules with a full-time job, I would advice you to look for Band 2 Medical Laboratory Scientist jobs, sometimes referred to as a Biomedical Support Worker. They work in the labs with the Biomedical Scientists. You'll need to apply for one eventually to get some NHS experience under your belt before applying for a Trainee BMS job. You never know, you might get lucky and you become a Band 2 MLA at a laboratory that plays an active role in training new Biomedical Scientists and allows you to train there.
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Surgywannabe
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Surgywannabe

(Original post by RegisteredBMS)
It sounds like the IBMS will probably suggest top-up modules. You can take them whenever you want. They're not committing you to anyway. Nobody really does them full-time, and usually a module at a time so it's barely even part-time. Distance learning often.

You're considering a Band 2 role. You can do top-up modules with a full-time job, I would advice you to look for Band 2 Medical Laboratory Scientist jobs, sometimes referred to as a Biomedical Support Worker. They work in the labs with the Biomedical Scientists. You'll need to apply for one eventually to get some NHS experience under your belt before applying for a Trainee BMS job. You never know, you might get lucky and you become a Band 2 MLA at a laboratory that plays an active role in training new Biomedical Scientists and allows you to train there.
Hello,

I was hoping I could ask a question, i've tried researching and googling and cant find much help and you seem really well versed and active.

I'm looking to study at a Universtity to od Undergrad Biomedical Science the University says "This degree is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS). It is not approved by The Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) for Registration. However, when put together with completion of the IBMS's Registration Training Portfolio, it does provide eligibility to apply for HCPC Registration as a Biomedical Scientist. The IBMS Training Portfolio can potentially be completed during the placement year of the 4 year sandwich course (B931); however the majority of students undertake this after graduation, once in appropriate employment."

Is this normal for most universities to have? Would you recommend to do this or find a university that is both HCPC and IMBS accrediated? (I'm looking to do a physician associate degree after my biomedical science degree)

Thank you so much!
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by Surgywannabe)
Surgywannabe


Hello,

I was hoping I could ask a question, i've tried researching and googling and cant find much help and you seem really well versed and active.

I'm looking to study at a Universtity to od Undergrad Biomedical Science the University says "This degree is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS). It is not approved by The Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) for Registration. However, when put together with completion of the IBMS's Registration Training Portfolio, it does provide eligibility to apply for HCPC Registration as a Biomedical Scientist. The IBMS Training Portfolio can potentially be completed during the placement year of the 4 year sandwich course (B931); however the majority of students undertake this after graduation, once in appropriate employment."

Is this normal for most universities to have? Would you recommend to do this or find a university that is both HCPC and IMBS accrediated? (I'm looking to do a physician associate degree after my biomedical science degree)

Thank you so much!
Yes it is normal. HCPC don't accredit courses, but some courses can provide registration, namely BSc Healthcare Science (Life Science).

Please do not take this route. Why would you become a qualified Biomedical Scientist to then immediately go on to somebody else. It's a waste of time and an opportunity taken away from someone who actually wants to be a Biomedical Scientist.
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Surgywannabe
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(Original post by RegisteredBMS)
Yes it is normal. HCPC don't accredit courses, but some courses can provide registration, namely BSc Healthcare Science (Life Science).

Please do not take this route. Why would you become a qualified Biomedical Scientist to then immediately go on to somebody else. It's a waste of time and an opportunity taken away from someone who actually wants to be a Biomedical Scientist.
What would you recommend instead of biomedical to get to a Physician associate post graduate, most online stuff mention biomedical sciences.
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by Surgywannabe)
What would you recommend instead of biomedical to get to a Physician associate post graduate, most online stuff mention biomedical sciences.
By all means do BSc Biomedical Science degree, but doing a placement and persuading HCPC registration is an absolute waste of a position that somebody who actually wants that career could use. It's a career that is particularly difficult to get into if you don't start on the correct path, and if you take the path without intention of using it it's a waste.
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