How do I revise efficiently to get all 7,8 and 9s on my GCSE?

Watch
Interesting name
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#1
So I am really worried about my GCSEs which are next year (2021) but I do not know how to revise smarter (not harder). I have beenookikg into the active techniques but I would like some help on how to use active learning in terms of methods or any method that is really efficient.

I am quite a lazy person and get distracted easily, I can't go full hours without a break, which is why I am trying to attempt the Pomodoro technique, 25 mins solid work 5 mins rest.

Basically, how do I get myself to revise efficient methods, how much time per day (pretend it's September at the time of this being posted), and how do I get confident and motivated?

Thank you
0
reply
king1234567890
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 week ago
#2
What are you taking? I'm in year 10 but was meant to take GCSE's this year so I might be able to offer some advice and support 😊😊.
0
reply
liketorun
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 week ago
#3
Consistency is key, so once you've learnt something, dont leave it months before you go back and look back over things, its better to try and make an effort to understand things and remember things as soon as you've learnt them.

Staying after school for an hour or two to get work done will also help with distraction, as awful as that may sound.

Maybe give flash cards a go?

A method I found particularly useful was when id finished learning something, id go home, revise it a bit, and then pretend to be a teacher and try and explain what you've just learnt as if you were teaching another student, this will force you to understand something more deeply.

Theres no set amount of hours you have to work to secure grades 7-9, but keep in mind a lot of people say they wished they'd started revising earlier, so if you start doing even little bits of revision throughout the whole year, you'll feel more confident.

good luck!
0
reply
Interesting name
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#4
(Original post by liketorun)
Consistency is key, so once you've learnt something, dont leave it months before you go back and look back over things, its better to try and make an effort to understand things and remember things as soon as you've learnt them.

Staying after school for an hour or two to get work done will also help with distraction, as awful as that may sound.

Maybe give flash cards a go?

A method I found particularly useful was when id finished learning something, id go home, revise it a bit, and then pretend to be a teacher and try and explain what you've just learnt as if you were teaching another student, this will force you to understand something more deeply.

Theres no set amount of hours you have to work to secure grades 7-9, but keep in mind a lot of people say they wished they'd started revising earlier, so if you start doing even little bits of revision throughout the whole year, you'll feel more confident.

good luck!
Thank you very much for your reply, I am starting earlier aka beginning of year 11 but the thing is I'm so confused on how to revise, hence this posy
0
reply
Interesting name
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#5
(Original post by king1234567890)
What are you taking? I'm in year 10 but was meant to take GCSE's this year so I might be able to offer some advice and support 😊😊.
I'm taking:
AQA; all sciences
EdExcel; Maths
I think IGCSE; English
Not too sure in my French and German
Not too sure on my DT and electronics
0
reply
stillcrying
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 week ago
#6
I used the website seneca learning for my revision in year 11, accumulating over 100 hours. It has pretty much every subject and exam board and it’s completely free! I used listen to movie soundtracks while revising (nothing with lyrics) and spend a few hours doing that every day; the background music helped me focus. I didn’t find that flash cards/mind maps worked for me unlike most people so was really happy when my teacher recommended seneca. I got 888877776 (wish it was a 7 but it really don’t matter now, it was only English lit) and I’d also suggest doing exam questions/past papers as the same/similar ones will come up in your exam. Hope this helps!
Last edited by stillcrying; 1 week ago
0
reply
Interesting name
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#7
(Original post by stillcrying)
I used the website seneca learning for my revision in year 11, accumulating over 100 hours. It has pretty much every subject and exam board and it’s completely free! I used listen to movie soundtracks while revising (nothing with lyrics) and spend a few hours doing that every day; the background music helped me focus. I didn’t find that flash cards/mind maps worked for me unlike most people so was really happy when my teacher recommended seneca. I got 888877776 (wish it was a 7 but it really don’t matter now, it was only English lit) and I’d also suggest doing exam questions/past papers as the same/similar ones will come up in your exam. Hope this helps!
I use senca too, but maybe not enough, I also did not know it covered all subjects, just sciences so thank you very much
0
reply
stillcrying
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 week ago
#8
(Original post by Interesting name)
I use senca too, but maybe not enough, I also did not know it covered all subjects, just sciences so thank you very much
Yeah it really benefited me - I’m still using it for a-level! Don’t go overboard doing 6 hours a day of revision; I made this mistake during my mocks and got burnt out. If you just do a few hours every day after school, you’ll have built up all your knowledge in time for your exams. Even during my exams, I was only doing a few hours after school and then playing Xbox/chilling for the rest of my evenings. I knew I’d built up my knowledge so I didn’t need to revise hard during the exam season itself. Best of luck!
0
reply
aw03
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 week ago
#9
heyy so i did my gcses in 2018 and i'll tell you how i revised my subjects

English Lit: AQA & i got a 9
for English i had one of the best teachers in the world so that defo contributed to my grade haha. in lesson we would annotate the texts / poems and then i would summarise it all into revision cards. i had about 1.5 cards for all 15 poems and all the important characters & themes in my books. i did power & conflict poems, macbeth, an inspector calls and a christmas carol. i found this a really efficient method because all my important points were in one place. i also recommend doing practice essay questions & paragraphs and getting your teacher to mark them. also practice being concise, it really helps.
i actually ended up getting full marks in the second paper (96/96) and overall i got 154/160 in the exam which i've never gotten before so i think it was a useful revision method. my school got my paper back & i could email you it if you want.

English Lang: AQA & i got a 7
imo, the only good and useful way to revise for English Lang is to do practice papers and be well versed in the different types of language & structure. i would also say for question 5 in paper 1, find out which you usually do better on: the story or the description and stick to it. also write a couple of stories / descriptions that you could use for a wide variety of prompts. if you can use it in the exam, it could really help ease pressure and secure you a good mark in that question.

Combined Science: AQA and i got 8-8
what i did was after every lesson, i would go through my notes & the revision guide (a god send) and i would make mini Q&A cards. so on one side of the card i would write "why can't an ionic compound conduct electricity as a solid but can as a liquid" and then i would have the answer on the back. then you go through the cards and put the ones you got right on one side and the ones you got wrong on another side and you keep going until they're all on the right side. i had this for every single topic for bio, chem and phys and it was such a good way to remember all the content. you can make these by hand or on a revision site like quizlet.
next when all my cards were on the right side, i would do exam questions. exam questions for science are the most useful tool because they will inevitably ask the same questions as previous years. once you become confident in answering exam questions, the exam itself shouldn't be too much hassle.

Maths: Edexcel & i got a 7
for maths, all i can say is practice questions, practice questions, practice questions. like science, they will inevitably start asking the same questions. useful websites are mathsgenie, corbett maths and physics & maths tutor. don't be afraid to do questions from the A*-G specification because they didn't change much imo.

i also did History, RE & Citizenship (Edexcel) and Food Prep & Nutrition (AQA) so if you do any of these subjects then i can tell you how i revised those too.

i saw you said you're quite lazy lol and i think the Pomodoro method could work for you. i would also say that if you get bored revising a subject, instead of stopping revision altogether, try move onto a different subject. that way you're at least still getting something done. good luck for your GCSEs and lemme know if there's anything i can do to help. you've got this!
2
reply
15holmes.j
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 week ago
#10
hi,
i was supposed to be sitting my gcse's this september and was predicted all 8's and 9's, so I can hopefully give you some advice. All these worked for me, but try them out and see what works for you.
Before the science mocks ( i did triple), i would get the textbook and make a poster of all the information i didn't know for each one. I would wait 2 days and make a new poster of all the information I didn't know, the idea being they would get smaller and smaller over time. i did 4 of these for each science. it really helped consolidate the information. i also made flashcards for all the equations, to study them before i went into the exams.
For english it really helped to look at online essays as you get some really in depth analysis you haven't necesarily seen before. I then made a flashcard for each theme and poem. i condensed all the information on these which made it a lot easier to learn.
For maths i went over my past papers and looked at areas i did badly in. I then used textbooks and hegarty maths to practise questions in these areas.
For languages i made posters with tense tables and really good phrases to use in writing and speaking, i would study them before the exams.
I know you're not taking history, but what i did for this was to make mini flashcards with one fact on the back and a key date/ topic on the front accompanied by a drawing. This really helped me memorise things and jog my memory.
Hope this helps!
0
reply
Flk10
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 week ago
#11
Personally to get top grades I think you need to revise smart and hard. It’s good to be efficient but you should also be getting your head down and working hard.

To stay motivated, I’d recommend setting a really ambitious goal for your results-I.e. 6 9s and 4 8s. Stick this on your wall and on your phone to constantly remind yourself.

In terms of hours, I’d recommend getting into a revision routine and sticking to it from September. 2 and a half hours Monday- Thursday and then 6 hours over the weekend (made up of homework and revision) is a good place to start. You can then increase this when exams are closer- ultimately you’ll want to be doing around 3.5 hours on a school night and 7 hours per weekend day to get top grades.
0
reply
akay8
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 week ago
#12
Revising for 6/7 hours a day on the weekends etc might work for some people, but seems pretty excessive to me. Be super aware of burnout - that’s a lot of time to be revising!

I did my GCSEs in 2018 and got all 9s and 8s and I DEFINITELY didn’t revise for 6/7 hours every day on weekends. I’d say, on average, I worked for 3/4 hours a day on weekends and 2 hours after school on weekdays from January.

Main tips: start early, and make a big checklist! There was nothing more satisfying after an hour revision session than ticking that next topic of the list.

And vary your revision to keep yourself interested. I did all sorts from flashcards to posters, quick fire quizzes to past papers depending on subjects. And make sure to test yourself after revising a topic, maybe using a different method, to make sure the key facts have sunk in.

Also, I found condensing is key! GCSEs are mainly about some core facts that need to be recalled for certain questions, and particular structures for essays in English and so on. Become super familiar with these and you can’t go wrong - nothing in those exams will be able to take you by surprise that way.

Hope this helps
0
reply
Kibser
  • Political Ambassador
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 week ago
#13
I absolutely destroyed my school print credit printing off past papers. You can't get better prep than that imo.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How do you feel about your grades? Are they...

What I expected (124)
24.46%
Better than expected (106)
20.91%
Worse than expected (277)
54.64%

Watched Threads

View All