Aduminum
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Hi
I will be applying to uni this year and want to do an architecture course. My issue is that I will have a lot of trouble supporting myself financially - as I come from a poor family- and have social anxiety, which would make living alone difficult. A friend has offered to share an apartment with me, as they are already in uni and we could split bills etc. However, this would mean going to a university that doesn't do the course that I want ( the closest course I could find there is interior design.) I am unsure whether I should try living alone and doing the degree I want to or if I should do a slightly different degree, but have the comfort of being with a friend and be somewhat financially supported.
Any advice would be appreciated
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Dechante
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(Original post by Aduminum)
Hi
I will be applying to uni this year and want to do an architecture course. My issue is that I will have a lot of trouble supporting myself financially - as I come from a poor family- and have social anxiety, which would make living alone difficult. A friend has offered to share an apartment with me, as they are already in uni and we could split bills etc. However, this would mean going to a university that doesn't do the course that I want ( the closest course I could find there is interior design.) I am unsure whether I should try living alone and doing the degree I want to or if I should do a slightly different degree, but have the comfort of being with a friend and be somewhat financially supported.
Any advice would be appreciated
Have you looked into hardship funds or bursaries for people of low household incomes? Many universities offer this for people who have a household income of £25,000 or below and you don't have to pay bursaries back. Also, maintenance loans take into account your household income.
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Ellix_x
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(Original post by Dechante)
Have you looked into hardship funds or bursaries for people of low household incomes? Many universities offer this for people who have a household income of £25,000 or below and you don't have to pay bursaries back. Also, maintenance loans take into account your household income.
I think the most I can get is £500 a year in terms of bursaries, even though my family's income is less than 12k. And I'm not a big fan of taking out loans, but I'm definitely considering it.
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Dechante
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(Original post by Ellix_x)
I think the most I can get is £500 a year in terms of bursaries, even though my family's income is less than 12k. And I'm not a big fan of taking out loans, but I'm definitely considering it.
I wouldn't really compare a maintenance or tuition loan to just any other loan. Almost every student takes both of these out. You only have to pay it back once you reach a threshold of 26k a year and it gets written off after 30 years. It's not like it's ''oh you have just graduated uni now you owe me 30k''. You also pay it in small instalments which depends on your income after you have graduated. I would recommend reading this to make your mind up https://www.savethestudent.org/stude...nce-loans.html. I would also look out for bursaries/grants and I think the link is on there as they don't have to be paid back. You can get some weird ones from being vegetarian to just getting money for your last name. I get one just because of my postcode
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