Why are we all so mentally messed up.

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glassalice
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This generation of young people are probably the most mentally messed up. Ie. Rates of mental illnesses, suicide & selfharm are on the up.
Conversely, we are probably living in one of the safest time periods and arguably most free societies of all time. What had gone wrong?
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LaPregunta
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Nothin really free about the society of today, but that's a political issue.

What went wrong? Children stopped bein children.
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LovelyMrFox
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The amount of academic pressure, lack of strong parenting and guidence, and the internet all play a big role.
Like LaPregunta said, children have stopped being children. There are so many pressures in kid's lives now that it really starts to wear down on them.
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ByEeek
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(Original post by glassalice)
This generation of young people are probably the most mentally messed up. Ie. Rates of mental illnesses, suicide & selfharm are on the up.
Conversely, we are probably living in one of the safest time periods and arguably most free societies of all time. What had gone wrong?
The big thing I can see is that life is now very uncertain and the pace of change is high. You can be an expert in something and in high demand today and in 5 years time you are completely redundant.

There is also a huge gap between the expectations people have of life as portayed by the media and the reality. Success as defined by society is unachievable to the majority.
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looloo2134
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(Original post by glassalice)
This generation of young people are probably the most mentally messed up. Ie. Rates of mental illnesses, suicide & selfharm are on the up.
Conversely, we are probably living in one of the safest time periods and arguably most free societies of all time. What had gone wrong?
Or young people have always had mental health problems we just know about them more and it more talked about.
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Picnic1
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There are a lot of people over the age of 50 who are JOYFULLY ignorant about movies and videogames. Their generation sometimes only regarded music as a cool artform. Videogames represent an entire other controllable universe that can connect people. Videogames have sometimes been unique forms of art, philosophy, and social spaces.

Young people are living dual or triple media-focussed lives whilst a lot of older generations ignore or never meet anyone who they engage with in a modern, imaginative, way.
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LaPregunta
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(Original post by Picnic1)
There are a lot of people over the age of 50 who are JOYFULLY ignorant about movies and videogames. Their generation sometimes only regarded music as a cool artform. Videogames represent an entire other controllable universe that can connect people. Videogames have sometimes been unique forms of art, philosophy, and social spaces.

Young people are living dual or triple media-focussed lives whilst a lot of older generations ignore or never meet anyone who they engage with in a modern, imaginative, way.
Bein busy was a good thing in those days, away from the idle worship of today. They can't understand it- 'the meaningless simulation' a friend called it- and, to some extent, nor can I.

Video-games are not bad, but they're, especially now, an utter waste of time.
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Picnic1
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(Original post by LaPregunta)
Bein busy was a good thing in those days, away from the idle worship of today. They can't understand it- 'the meaningless simulation' a friend called it- and, to some extent, nor can I.

Video-games are not bad, but they're, especially now, an utter waste of time.
That's why they get games awards given by the British Academy, eh? The movie A Beautiful Mind is about game theory expert John Nash. Nowadays, there are a plethora of games that allow a certain amount of game theory on the fly. I'm currently playing Mario + Rabbids Battle on the Switch. Some of the levels demand serious puzzle solving skill. Level design in games can sometimes be truly architectural. It's not all superhero fantasy fulfillment. Chances are, many of the great artists of the future, if not now, will have been partly inspired by some level design or aesthetic in a videogame.
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LaPregunta
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(Original post by Picnic1)
That's why they get games awards given by the British Academy, eh? The movie A Beautiful Mind is about game theory expert John Nash. Nowadays, there are a plethora of games that allow a certain amount of game theory on the fly. I'm currently playing Mario + Rabbids Battle on the Switch. Some of the levels demand serious puzzle solving skill. Level design in games can sometimes be truly architectural. It's not all superhero fantasy fulfillment. Chances are, many of the great artists of the future, if not now, will have been partly inspired by some level design or aesthetic in a videogame.
I think you think yourself to be a rather common character.

Art is dead, if video-games revive it, it'll be inferior to the art inspired by God and/or Beauty.
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Picnic1
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(Original post by LaPregunta)
I think you think yourself to be a rather common character.

Art is dead, if video-games revive it, it'll be inferior to the art inspired by God and/or Beauty
You are too 1960s era soundbitey (’Art is dead' - says who? You actually took the likes of Marcel Duchamp at face value? When did it die for you though? Why did it die for you? Because you're actually not particularly a fan of artistic progression?) to actually meaningfully converse with. Art inspired by beauty? You mean human physical beauty as opposed to the beauty of a nice piece of engineering, for example?
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LaPregunta
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(Original post by Picnic1)
You are too 1960s era soundbitey (’Art is dead' - says who? You actually took the likes of Marcel Duchamp at face value? When did it die for you though? Why did it die for you? Because you're actually not particularly a fan of artistic progression?) to actually meaningfully converse with. Art inspired by beauty? You mean human physical beauty as opposed to the beauty of a nice piece of engineering, for example?
I suppose I probably am, I'm not for modernity, I lament its comin.
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JSG29
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(Original post by Picnic1)
That's why they get games awards given by the British Academy, eh? The movie A Beautiful Mind is about game theory expert John Nash. Nowadays, there are a plethora of games that allow a certain amount of game theory on the fly. I'm currently playing Mario + Rabbids Battle on the Switch. Some of the levels demand serious puzzle solving skill. Level design in games can sometimes be truly architectural. It's not all superhero fantasy fulfillment. Chances are, many of the great artists of the future, if not now, will have been partly inspired by some level design or aesthetic in a videogame.
Just to point out game theory is not particularly about what non-mathematicians consider games. Game theory is about making optimal strategic decisions - it has applications in everything from economics and politics to computer science.
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DiddyDec
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(Original post by LaPregunta)
I think you think yourself to be a rather common character.

Art is dead, if video-games revive it, it'll be inferior to the art inspired by God and/or Beauty.
Art is dead :lol:

Art is alive and doing very well.
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Picnic1
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(Original post by DiddyDec)
Art is dead :lol:

Art is alive and doing very well.
And supposedly they're 'not for modernity', although their pic shows a girl with a 1920s bob, a period that was literally the 'Modernist' age.
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Sabertooth
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Mental illness has always been a thing, only we don't drill holes in people's skulls, stick them in asylums, or poke a screwdriver into their frontal lobes anymore. The whole deinstitutionalization movement put mental illness in front of people, no longer was it hidden away and today we still see this only with new medications keeping people in the community. People are more willing to admit they are struggling and, although certainly still present, there is also less stigma now.
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glassalice
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(Original post by Sabertooth)
Mental illness has always been a thing, only we don't drill holes in people's skulls, stick them in asylums, or poke a screwdriver into their frontal lobes anymore. The whole deinstitutionalization movement put mental illness in front of people, no longer was it hidden away and today we still see this only with new medications keeping people in the community. People are more willing to admit they are struggling and, although certainly still present, there is also less stigma now.
Yeah, thats the severe end of the mental illness spectrum. I think though people have always been awere of it to some degree. However it was often conceptualised in a different way ie possession.
An interesting thing is that in parts of the world with worse access to healthcare, according to some metrics, people with SMI live better lives. Ie. There life expectancies are proportionally far longer.

(Original post by LaPregunta)
Bein busy was a good thing in those days, away from the idle worship of today. They can't understand it- 'the meaningless simulation' a friend called it- and, to some extent, nor can I.

Video-games are not bad, but they're, especially now, an utter waste of time.
Video-games reduce the amout of time people spend outside. Anacdotelay there's something amazingly uplifting the outdoors. Maybe it's the sunlight or the vitamin D.

(Original post by looloo2134)
Or young people have always had mental health problems we just know about them more and it more talked about.
Or rather, has the language we use to talk about a range of life experiences changed? Are we, as a society pathologising the everyday?
What could our modern life styles be inherently unhealthy?

(Original post by ByEeek)
The big thing I can see is that life is now very uncertain and the pace of change is high. You can be an expert in something and in high demand today and in 5 years time you are completely redundant.

There is also a huge gap between the expectations people have of life as portayed by the media and the reality. Success as defined by society is unachievable to the majority.
Prisom.
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DiddyDec
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Far more people killed themselves previously because they weren't receiving the care they needed due to the fact it wasn't talked about.
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glassalice
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(Original post by DiddyDec)
Far more people killed themselves previously because they weren't receiving the care they needed due to the fact it wasn't talked about.
Suicide rates are still rising...
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DiddyDec
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(Original post by glassalice)
Suicide rates are still rising...
But they are far lower than they were.

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fallen_acorns
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My take is that severe mental health issues haven't risen at all. I don't think you will find more cases of schizophrenic type disorders, bipolar, multiple personality, etc. etc. There just may feel like there is more of them because they aren't thrown away to die in poor houses/insane asylums or hidden away by the family out of shame etc. any more.

I do think there is a rise in minor (comparatively) mental health issues.. especially anxiety. For me the best explanation of this is that the complexity of life has increased so much in the last 100 years, that I think its pushed a lot of people to the edge of what they can handle. Its not the difficulty or struggle that's increased. By all accounts life was harder back 100 years ago, but its the sheer mental strain of whats expected, especially of younger people. Our society is so complex now.. its fast moving, and so detailed in how you need to work with it..

Education has gone from listening to a teacher for a few years before getting a job.. to a massive huge complex machine that you need to negotiate through and pay for and try and not make the wrong decisions at each turn...

Social lives have gone from just being a small circle of people you lived near, to being a global web of interconected people all linked on social media, all sharing, all the time..

Relationships have gone from being a simple marriage for life with a girl/boy down the road or that your family new.. to being a complex dance of dating, taboos, etc.

Jobs have gone from being a simple occupation, often for life, often passed down from your family, to being a constant battle throughout your life to change and become better, advance and adapt through multiple companies, bossess, new enviroments etc.

Media has gone from being a book, and maybe a radio.. to a million options online, all fighting for your attention, all trying to get you adicted and hooked on their latest idea..

etc. etc.

In isolation I think all of these things are probably good, and there was a good reason why we advanced towards them. But all combined together they have made life extremely more complex and mentally taxing. And I think this is where the rise in minor mental health issues is coming from. I think many of us, at some stages of our life are just being pushed mentally a bit too far, taxed a bit too much, and the strain of modern complexity hits us.. whether we fear it through anxiety or give up on it through depression.
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