Does it really matter if i take soft subjects for a demanding course?

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Soph975
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If I take soft subjects (such as psychology), would it hinder my chances of studying law at a good uni??
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Soph975)
If I take soft subjects (such as psychology), would it hinder my chances of studying law at a good uni??
Please stop cross posting this question and asking it in different ways. One thread per question is plenty, so everyone gets the chance to get answers to their questions. Thanks
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Quick-use
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(Original post by Soph975)
If I take soft subjects (such as psychology), would it hinder my chances of studying law at a good uni??
It's not a soft subject at all and no, it won't hinder your chances. The concept of 'soft' A levels has long been scrapped.

All you need are the grades and any required subjects. That's all. :rambo: You could take A level Psychology, Politics and Sociology and still apply to the most reputable universities and get in.
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Soph975
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Please stop cross posting this question and asking it in different ways. One thread per question is plenty, so everyone gets the chance to get answers to their questions. Thanks
Of course, Sorry!
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Soph975
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(Original post by Quick-use)
It's not a soft subject at all and no, it won't hinder your chances. The concept of 'soft' A levels has long been scrapped.

All you need are the grades and any required subjects. That's all. :rambo: You could take A level Psychology, Politics and Sociology and still apply to the most reputable universities and get in.
Ahh ok thanks. My school told us that we should mainly take subjects off of a particular list (which was basically a list of traditional subjects), but i really like the look of psychology, but idk if it will be a useless a level, or if good unis will see it as respectable or “soft.”
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cherryxberry
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better to do a subject u find interesting and get a good grade than do something u don’t like and perform poorly.. if u find it interesting do it!
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Soph975)
Of course, Sorry!
No problem - it just makes it easier if you confine your question to one thread, and then you'll have a single reference point for all the answers. By all means give it a cheeky bump after 12 hours or so if you've received no, or very few, answers - the rules on bumping are here

Hopefully your mind has been put at rest about this subject anyway. Please note that 'soft subjects' is an old-fashioned and outdated idea now - have a look at Informed Choices instead, which is the updated guidance.
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_gcx
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The idea of "soft subjects" came from the idea of "facilitating subjects" - which was misunderstood so much (and threatened entries for more creative subjects) it was dropped. They basically only ever meant, "if you're unsure on what you should take - look at taking a few of these to make sure you open a lot of doors for university courses" and were about subjects being applicable to a broad range of degree courses, not about how "rigorous" or "hard" they were. (but of course - people wrongly took it this way)

Psychology would be fine in your case, and I imagine it would be a useful complement for law.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by _gcx)
The idea of "soft subjects" came from the idea of "facilitating subjects" - which was misunderstood so much (and threatened entries for more creative subjects) it was dropped. They basically only ever meant, "if you're unsure on what you should take - look at taking a few of these to make sure you open a lot of doors for university courses" and were about subjects being applicable to a broad range of degree courses, not about how "rigorous" or "hard" they were. (but of course - people wrongly took it this way)

Psychology would be fine in your case, and I imagine it would be a useful complement for law.
Exactly so. Facilitating subjects, although well intentioned, went horribly wrong when the TSR-type students who have to have everything ranked so they can compare themselves to the rest of the cohort and find themselves 'better' had something to wave around to prove definitively that an 'ology' was a joke.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Soph975)
If I take soft subjects (such as psychology), would it hinder my chances of studying law at a good uni??
No uni has psychology on its list of non-preferred A level subjects
(Original post by Soph975)
Ahh ok thanks. My school told us that we should mainly take subjects off of a particular list (which was basically a list of traditional subjects), but i really like the look of psychology, but idk if it will be a useless a level, or if good unis will see it as respectable or “soft.”
LSE is a very fussy uni and even they are happy with most A level subjects with the exception of a few like Media Studies and PE (look at their list of "generally preferred" and "common non preferred" subjects listed under Subject Combinations).

https://www.lse.ac.uk/study-at-lse/U...ns-Information
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