How much do you utilise your tutor?

Watch
Poll: How much do you use/meet with your tutor?
Not at all (5)
22.73%
The minimum/the least I can get away with (9)
40.91%
A moderate amount; not extensively but not for everything (4)
18.18%
As much as I can and/or whenever I need advice on something (4)
18.18%
KittyN
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#21
Report 1 week ago
#21
(Original post by Anonymous)
What's the pastoral support like at uni? Do you get any freedom, or is it basically just a continuation of secondary school and sixth form?

I'm already sick of safeguarding, etc, and I want to have a proper adult life when I get to uni? I'll be an adult - not a toddler and I don't need rules preventing me from everything!

Do you get freedom, or is everyone so fragile that it isn't an option? Obviously there should be support if you need it, but it shouldn't be forced on everyone like in secondary school/sixth form...
There's not the same idea of "safeguarding" at uni, since you're all adults. Unless you actively go and tell a lecturer that you need help, they're not going to know what goes on outside of class anyway.

Your uni may still have rules about a few things (e.g. student/staff relationships may be banned and almost certainly have to be declared. Lecturers may have to tell someone if you say you're going to harm yourself or others) but if you're 18+, they won't tell your parents or social services.
0
reply
Sycaphore
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#22
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#22
(Original post by Catherine1973)
I have seen mine once, at start of first year. I assumed we’d have to arrange another meeting post first year xmas exams but he went on strike then COVID happened.
I should try and arrange a meeting for start of second year to discuss results. Other reason to see them more is if you need a reference so they remember you but that’s not going to be a issue for me as I have kept up my old job throughout university.
I dislike this new “drop in to my open hours via zoom” as it just seems that you can barge in when they are chatting to someone else? Should be arrange a time in advance really.
BIB: Yeah, whatever I decide to do after I graduate I won't be able to go to my tutor for a reference! He doesn't know me at all and, to be honest, it'd probably be a bit cheeky of me since I barely engaged with him at all when it was required to/in normal circumstances. Hopefully I'll be able to count on my dissertation advisor in that regard (although he's probably wondering why I haven't been in contact for over a month now, even though I don't need to and he was a bit vague on when I should again).
0
reply
Catherine1973
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#23
Report 1 week ago
#23
We have been told that any reference requests must go to our academic tutor and no one else. They can write one based off your academic record, I assume they have access to all grades and tutor feedback and attendence records.
They can just write a better one if they know you a bit more. But should do one regardless. (Though you must still politely ask permission first)
0
reply
Mr Wednesday
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#24
Report 1 week ago
#24
(Original post by Sycaphore)
He doesn't know me at all and, to be honest, it'd probably be a bit cheeky of me since I barely engaged with him at all when it was required to/in normal circumstances.
Don’t do this people ! From “the other side” of the discussion its MUCH easier to write a decent letter of reference for a student you know well, who turns up to meetings, answers emails and engages with you as a tutor. You don’t have to be “best buddies” but you do have to invest in a bit of time in relationship management if you want to then be able to ask for help and support.
0
reply
_gcx
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#25
Report 1 week ago
#25
Idk what I'd ask him about. I only meet him for the scheduled termly meetings.
1
reply
Sycaphore
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#26
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#26
(Original post by Mr Wednesday)
Don’t do this people ! From “the other side” of the discussion its MUCH easier to write a decent letter of reference for a student you know well, who turns up to meetings, answers emails and engages with you as a tutor. You don’t have to be “best buddies” but you do have to invest in a bit of time in relationship management if you want to then be able to ask for help and support.
My only engaging with him during our scheduled meetings is actually beyond the limit I've ever needed him for any help and support; in fact I've never needed him but of course the uni presupposes we do three times a year. I found going to meetings more of a nuisance than anything. I probably, with hindsight and maybe going forwards, should use/appreciate him more but it's going to be hard to adopt that attitude so suddenly and with no real need to on my part; I second what @_gcx said.
Last edited by Sycaphore; 1 week ago
0
reply
_gcx
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#27
Report 1 week ago
#27
(Original post by Mr Wednesday)
Don’t do this people ! From “the other side” of the discussion its MUCH easier to write a decent letter of reference for a student you know well, who turns up to meetings, answers emails and engages with you as a tutor. You don’t have to be “best buddies” but you do have to invest in a bit of time in relationship management if you want to then be able to ask for help and support.
This is what I'm worried about to be honest. I do go to their termly meetings but I'm not sure what else I'm supposed to do considering my current one doesn't specialise in an area that I'm interested in and/so I have nothing really to talk to them about, so I'm not sure how they'd write a good reference.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How are you feeling ahead of results day?

Very Confident (6)
4.17%
Confident (14)
9.72%
Indifferent (15)
10.42%
Unsure (32)
22.22%
Worried (77)
53.47%

Watched Threads

View All