geogteach557
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Hi,

I'm just wondering what changes have been made to everyone else's teacher training programmes due to the pandemic?

My course was very quick to say that we would not be allowed in schools until January and that we would only have one placement. This left September to October as a time for us to get all of the academic aspects out of the way in person. They said this was because we obviously couldn't be going between uni and school within each week - which makes sense.

They have now said that the whole university side of the course will now be online between September and December. However, they are still not allowing us into school, despite the fact that we would no longer be mixing with others at university.

To be honest I'm quite disappointed with the route they have taken, especially since I know other people doing teacher training who will be in school from September.

Are other people in a similar situation? or are you being allowed into schools earlier with online classes?
Last edited by geogteach557; 6 days ago
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Muserock
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I did my PGCE last year (2019/2020) so we had the last placement moved to online learning. It wasn't ideal but it couldn't be helped. All that I have heard for this year is that from September, it will be a mixture of online/small group teaching at university and that the university are hoping to send out students in November for their first placement (which is about 6 weeks).

I think the issue is probably the placement schools rather than mixing with others at university. Schools will have all students back in September (or at least that is the plan at the moment) so they'll be trying to avoid visitors coming in to the school.
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Always_Confused
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This link should tell you everything you need to know!

https://www.gov.uk/government/public...r-training-itt

It might seem gutting not to get as much school experience from your course, but the whole point is to keep potential trainees and pupils at the school safe in very uncertain times. I'm also starting a PGCE and I'm happy with the changes given the circumstances.
In place of a second placement, my university will be making us do online lessons or small group lessons to people doing a PGCE in a subject different to our own. Every uni course is having to adapt in some way or another. It's just a shame we'll be doing the one with such a big placement requirement!
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barnetlad
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I'm not a teacher but three of my family have been headteachers in my lifetime, though now retired. September is going to be a very difficult time for all teachers as you probably have no idea how well or badly the Covid 19 changes work or indeed how many children actually come into school. It will not be anything even vaguely realistic as a placement in the autumn term. Never mind the possibility of bringing Covid 19 into the school or taking it into the university.

I hope this change does not prevent you from becoming a successful and well respected teacher in time.
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geogteach557
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(Original post by Muserock)
I did my PGCE last year (2019/2020) so we had the last placement moved to online learning. It wasn't ideal but it couldn't be helped. All that I have heard for this year is that from September, it will be a mixture of online/small group teaching at university and that the university are hoping to send out students in November for their first placement (which is about 6 weeks).

I think the issue is probably the placement schools rather than mixing with others at university. Schools will have all students back in September (or at least that is the plan at the moment) so they'll be trying to avoid visitors coming in to the school.
I understand that school will be wary of visits, however, provided that we are not visiting university (which we won't be), we'll be just the same as regular teachers in terms of potentially bringing the virus into school - provided that social distancing can be followed. This seems to be the stance that other providers have taken anyway.
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Muserock
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(Original post by geogteach557)
I understand that school will be wary of visits, however, provided that we are not visiting university (which we won't be), we'll be just the same as regular teachers in terms of potentially bringing the virus into school - provided that social distancing can be followed. This seems to be the stance that other providers have taken anyway.
The thing is, it's not just you 'visiting' the school. You'll also have a university mentor coming in to assess you during observations so you won't be the same as regular teachers. However, doing all the theory initially isn't a bad thing at all. You'll be going into school knowing what the theory is before putting it into practice so you'll be more knowledgeable than other years where they have a few weeks at uni, then go off to placement, then come back to uni etc. It will also be better in some ways because you can get on with the assignments. If you can get those done (or make a good start with them), it will really help you on placement in terms of time management. I know it's disappointing but as well as keeping you safe, there are advantages to the way they are structuring it.
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remussjhj01
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Surely if you only have one placement you won't have done enough days to qualify for QTS at the end of your course?
I understand leaving the placements as long as possible, but entirely getting rid of one seems like it could make the who point of the course non-existent.
Has your uni said what will happen regarding QTS awards in this situation?
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fefssdf
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(Original post by remussjhj01)
Surely if you only have one placement you won't have done enough days to qualify for QTS at the end of your course?
I understand leaving the placements as long as possible, but entirely getting rid of one seems like it could make the who point of the course non-existent.
Has your uni said what will happen regarding QTS awards in this situation?
The guidelines surrounding the number of days required which is typically 120 has been changed, meaning you can still get qts without this much time spent in schools.
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