Driving on motorway alone thoughts??

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beyhive1
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Have you ever driven on a motorway alone? I've driven on normal roads and dual carriageways quite a lot but I don't have experience on 60/70mph motorways.
Should I just go for it? I think I'm a pretty safe driver. Any advice?
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Joseph Green
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If possible, take a parent with you for your first few times just so you get the feel of the road. I'm a new driver myself and have been on the motorway once. Even when it's quiet you should still be very alert but this could make new drivers anxious so having a parent or trusted person with you will help massively. Best of luck
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by beyhive1)
Have you ever driven on a motorway alone? I've driven on normal roads and dual carriageways quite a lot but I don't have experience on 60/70mph motorways.
Should I just go for it? I think I'm a pretty safe driver. Any advice?
It's not really that different from a 70mph dual carriageway (which, technically, it is). Some motorways only have 2 lanes per side (e.g. M11).

Be aware of your speed, especially when you leave the motorway. The left hand lane can be rutted from lorries, and the ruts collect water when it rains. Be careful not to allow lorries to tailgate you, and leave sufficient stopping distance - you may have to slow if someone overtakes you, and doesn't leave enough space - many don't. Check your blind spot before changing lanes - cars going at a similar speed can be "hidden" for a while.

Remember that these are the safest roads per mile, but do be aware that you are moving quite fast - it doesn't seem like it until you have to stop, or take avoiding action.
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Appirition
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(Original post by beyhive1)
Have you ever driven on a motorway alone? I've driven on normal roads and dual carriageways quite a lot but I don't have experience on 60/70mph motorways.
Should I just go for it? I think I'm a pretty safe driver. Any advice?
If you'd like to get some proper help with driving on Motorways, now you've got experience on other roads, you could ask your original driving instructor for 1 or 2 lessons on Motorway driving. There is also the Pass Plus which is specifically designed for people who have passed their standard test and got some driving experience. This covers all types of roads, including Motorways, and is intended as a way of demonstrating that you've improved your overall driving abilities since passing your standard test.

If you choose not to get help from a driving instructor, re-read the parts of the Highway Code specifically relating to Motorway driving, to make sure you remember the things which are different from other roads, then ask someone who has lots of Motorway driving experience to go out with you the first time, and choose a quieter time to go on the Motorway the first time.
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rawr_jess
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(Original post by beyhive1)
Have you ever driven on a motorway alone? I've driven on normal roads and dual carriageways quite a lot but I don't have experience on 60/70mph motorways.
Should I just go for it? I think I'm a pretty safe driver. Any advice?
I’ve been driving a year and actually prefer motorways tbh. They’re weirdly relaxing lol maybe choose a time when it might be quieter?
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Joshkav
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(Original post by beyhive1)
Have you ever driven on a motorway alone? I've driven on normal roads and dual carriageways quite a lot but I don't have experience on 60/70mph motorways.
Should I just go for it? I think I'm a pretty safe driver. Any advice?
When I passed, I tried to avoid them, just through being anxious. But once I got a job 40 miles away, I knew I needed to face my fears, so one day just went for it and did pretty well. Now 2 years later, motorway driving is my life, of the 20,000 miles I drive, around 18,000 of that is purely motorway driving of my commute.

When I was having driving lessons, my instructor used to take me to 60mph dual carriageways as often as he could, as motorway driving is only 10mph higher (this was before you could have driving lessons on the motorway)
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RichPiana
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I used to avoid motorways when I first passed but nowadays I prefer to use them wherever possible. There’s a few reasons why:
- Higher speed limit compared to most other roads (besides dual carriageways which have the national speed limit).
- For the most part they’re 3 lanes which means that you have an extra lane which can be used in the case of overtaking.
- No roundabouts or junctions that require you to slow down (unless you want to get off at a junction of course) so you’re not constantly having to slow down.
- No traffic lights or things like pedestrian crossings so you’re not having to to constantly stop then start again.

As a result of the points above I usually tend to use motorways wherever possible nowadays. It can generally be a lot easier than driving on normal street roads as well as you’re usually just travelling constantly at one speed and you don’t have to worry about things like pedestrian crossings, roundabouts, traffic lights etc. The only thing you have to worry about is changing lanes and you get used to that very quickly as well once you get a grip of using motorways.
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RoyalSheepy
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Hands down the easiest roads to drive on, in my opinion.

Always check mirrors frequently. I find myself checking mirrors more than looking infront of me tbh, if there's any incident in front of me I need to swerve away from then I know my surroundings and which way I can divert.

Always check blind spots! I have a blind spot light on my mirrors, but I still check blind spots. They are so important.

Don't go too slow, but go at a speed which is good for you. 60mph is a good speed to familiarise yourself with the roads.

Take care of speed if you're driving on Smart Motorways and other variable speed limit stretches.

Don't lane hog. Move to the left when you're not overtaking.

Lane disipline. As you would on a roundabout, look where the lanes are taking you. You'll know if the lane your in is branching off if the road marking lines change from being spaced to more frequent and closer together.

Keep your distance from the person infront of you, whilst always anticipating for any hazards or incidents that may happen around you.
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