Going from obese (94kg) to a healthy weight

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silverflowers
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Hi! So right now, I'm currently obese. I weigh 94kg and I'm about 5 foot 8 (I'm a girl). This is all kind of hard for me to admit as I don't ever talk about my weight but hopefully it's worth it.

I've had body image issues since I was a little kid, and once I joined high school I convinced myself I was fat (I wasn't), so I just emotionally ate all the time because I thought I was so fat already that it wouldn't make a difference, but it did, and now I've been stuck for years with unhealthy eating habits and at an unhealthy weight. I nudged into obese about 2 years ago and it set me off into doing a proper diet and I reached about 75kg, but I got so stressed if I broke the diet that it'd throw me off for days, so when Christmas came I gave up and gained it all back, plus more.

I'd been slowly but steadily losing weight for a couple months before lockdown (but not enough to make much difference), but as someone who does quite a bit of exercise, having to stop that but still eating the same put me back into obese, where I've stayed for the months since. I'm going into 6th form this year and it's hit me quite hard realising how difficult it is to find smart, well-fitting but not plain and boring clothes in the size 16 I wear, and I really want to lose weight again.

However, I still can't do a lot of the sport I was doing before lockdown. I am running every other day and doing other sport about once a week but that's it. Has anyone my age managed to go from being obese to a healthy weight before? I really want to lose weight in a steady way and still see a difference, but I would struggle cutting out everything sugary in my life (there is no unhealthy food like that in my house, but I do struggle with binge eating). I was potentially thinking about buying some middle-ground calorie snacks that are still tasty but not full of sugar, and slowly eating them at a normal pace of like one a day, rather than binge eating chocolate at the end of the week. Has anyone tried this before?

I'd be so grateful if anyone could give me any tips, tricks or advice about weight loss in general, but especially if you've gone from obese to healthy as a teen, as I feel it's something that's definitely not talked about enough. Thank you!

(Also, I hope that if I start successfully losing weight I track my progress on this thread!)
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Reality Check
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(Original post by silverflowers)
Hi! So right now, I'm currently obese. I weigh 94kg and I'm about 5 foot 8 (I'm a girl). This is all kind of hard for me to admit as I don't ever talk about my weight but hopefully it's worth it.

I've had body image issues since I was a little kid, and once I joined high school I convinced myself I was fat (I wasn't), so I just emotionally ate all the time because I thought I was so fat already that it wouldn't make a difference, but it did, and now I've been stuck for years with unhealthy eating habits and at an unhealthy weight. I nudged into obese about 2 years ago and it set me off into doing a proper diet and I reached about 75kg, but I got so stressed if I broke the diet that it'd throw me off for days, so when Christmas came I gave up and gained it all back, plus more.

I'd been slowly but steadily losing weight for a couple months before lockdown (but not enough to make much difference), but as someone who does quite a bit of exercise, having to stop that but still eating the same put me back into obese, where I've stayed for the months since. I'm going into 6th form this year and it's hit me quite hard realising how difficult it is to find smart, well-fitting but not plain and boring clothes in the size 16 I wear, and I really want to lose weight again.

However, I still can't do a lot of the sport I was doing before lockdown. I am running every other day and doing other sport about once a week but that's it. Has anyone my age managed to go from being obese to a healthy weight before? I really want to lose weight in a steady way and still see a difference, but I would struggle cutting out everything sugary in my life (there is no unhealthy food like that in my house, but I do struggle with binge eating). I was potentially thinking about buying some middle-ground calorie snacks that are still tasty but not full of sugar, and slowly eating them at a normal pace of like one a day, rather than binge eating chocolate at the end of the week. Has anyone tried this before?

I'd be so grateful if anyone could give me any tips, tricks or advice about weight loss in general, but especially if you've gone from obese to healthy as a teen, as I feel it's something that's definitely not talked about enough. Thank you!

(Also, I hope that if I start successfully losing weight I track my progress on this thread!)
Well done for having lost a significant amount of weight in the first place. You, along with 95% of other dieters, put it back on plus a bit extra, unfortunately. Over what time period did the 19kg weight gain happen?

It can be easier to lose weight when you're younger: you're usually more active and can easily have a higher energy expenditure than an older, more sedentary person. Use this to your advantage. You already know how to lose weight: you've clearly done it very successfully before. I'd recommend that as long as it wasn't some sort of deranged dieting, you do again what you've proved to work already. However, this time, you need to examine what is was about getting stressed that threw you off the diet in the first place, and then completely once Christmas came around. Stresses and issues will doubtless arise again during this weight loss, and you need to sort of pre-empt them by thinking about coping strategies that don't involve turning to food, so you can live your life and not only continue to lose weight, but keep that weight off, which is the hardest part.

Your paragraph about sugar was a bit troubling, as was the idea of 'not having any 'unhealthy food' in the house. It's a bit 'all or nothing' thinking, which would fit in with the binge eating issue. It's usually more helpful, and more sustainable, not to think of food in terms of 'good' and 'bad'. All food is OK - it's just how much of it we eat, and the overall balance. Obviously you need to restrict your energy intake if you want to lose weight, and restricting 'empty calories' like high fat, high sugar treats is the easy and most obvious place to start, but don't get into the mindset that you can't ever have chocolate or ice-cream or confectionary once in a while as a treat. As well as probably stopping the bingeing at the weekend on these things (you're bingeing on them because you're denying yourself them during the week, and creating an irresistible 'wave' of desire for them), it's a much more realistic, healthy way of going about things.

You're changing the way you eat permanently, not just during the time you're on a 'diet'. Develop healthier ways of thinking about food and make lots of small, permanent changes which are practical and that you can live with, taking into account your individual preferences and likes for food. You'll succeed, doubtless
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UnwantedKid
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The minute you see if as a diet you're most likely going to fail long-term. It needs to be a lifestyle change. Otherwise what will happen is you'll just keep going from losing weight to gaining weight, once you go back to old habits, and then losing weight again.

Reality Check has summed it up in a great way. You can still have all the things you enjoy, but it's all about moderation in what your're eating. Also, is there something psychological going on? Not saying there is but that can be a hurdle to overcome potentially, especially regarding the binge eating.
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londonmyst
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Do you have a target weight or specific clothes size that you are hoping to achieve?

I've been helping an obese hate crime survivor to lose weight over lockdown through controlling dietary intake, brief daily exercise workouts and swimming a couple of times a week.

She's gone down eight dress sizes, is more physically capable and looks healthier.
Homecooked meals served in reasonable portion sizes, no greasy takeaways, lots of still water and giving small fresh salads/fruit/nuts instead of crisps or chocolate.
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Chopinnocturne31
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I don’t have any more advice for you other than what has already been said but I’m watching this thread because I’d love to support you through this! I hope you post updates but no pressure of course 😊❤️
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silverflowers
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Well done for having lost a significant amount of weight in the first place. You, along with 95% of other dieters, put it back on plus a bit extra, unfortunately. Over what time period did the 19kg weight gain happen?

It can be easier to lose weight when you're younger: you're usually more active and can easily have a higher energy expenditure than an older, more sedentary person. Use this to your advantage. You already know how to lose weight: you've clearly done it very successfully before. I'd recommend that as long as it wasn't some sort of deranged dieting, you do again what you've proved to work already. However, this time, you need to examine what is was about getting stressed that threw you off the diet in the first place, and then completely once Christmas came around. Stresses and issues will doubtless arise again during this weight loss, and you need to sort of pre-empt them by thinking about coping strategies that don't involve turning to food, so you can live your life and not only continue to lose weight, but keep that weight off, which is the hardest part.

Your paragraph about sugar was a bit troubling, as was the idea of 'not having any 'unhealthy food' in the house. It's a bit 'all or nothing' thinking, which would fit in with the binge eating issue. It's usually more helpful, and more sustainable, not to think of food in terms of 'good' and 'bad'. All food is OK - it's just how much of it we eat, and the overall balance. Obviously you need to restrict your energy intake if you want to lose weight, and restricting 'empty calories' like high fat, high sugar treats is the easy and most obvious place to start, but don't get into the mindset that you can't ever have chocolate or ice-cream or confectionary once in a while as a treat. As well as probably stopping the bingeing at the weekend on these things (you're bingeing on them because you're denying yourself them during the week, and creating an irresistible 'wave' of desire for them), it's a much more realistic, healthy way of going about things.

You're changing the way you eat permanently, not just during the time you're on a 'diet'. Develop healthier ways of thinking about food and make lots of small, permanent changes which are practical and that you can live with, taking into account your individual preferences and likes for food. You'll succeed, doubtless
Hi! Thanks for replying!
I can't remember exactly but around the first 10kg I put back on really really quick, like 2 months, the rest went on in a good few months afterwards.

I'm going to try my best to repeat what I did the first time, but I just feel that so much of my life is centered around thinking about how much I weigh and therefore food that even just trying to live a healthier lifestyle was just this thing that I was constantly thinking about, so if I ate chocolate with my friends I'd feel so bad I'd just give up for a week. I'm definitely not going to let Christmas throw me off like it did before, I got given all of this chocolate by relatives I barely see but now I've realised that that doesn't actually mean I have to eat it, I can just give it to somebody.

My mum is a self described hippie, so she's just not a fan of processed things and such, so it's probably not as bad as it sounds. But I do think that all or nothing thing might have been something I did create for myself (nothing that my family have done).

Thanks so much for your help, I'll really try and take everything on board.
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silverflowers
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(Original post by gigaberry)
The minute you see if as a diet you're most likely going to fail long-term. It needs to be a lifestyle change. Otherwise what will happen is you'll just keep going from losing weight to gaining weight, once you go back to old habits, and then losing weight again.

Reality Check has summed it up in a great way. You can still have all the things you enjoy, but it's all about moderation in what your're eating. Also, is there something psychological going on? Not saying there is but that can be a hurdle to overcome potentially, especially regarding the binge eating.
I definitely need to focus on a lifestyle change, it's kind of difficult to imagine but I know it's needed.

Yeah, to be honest there is probably something psychological going on. I've struggled with a lot of mental health stuff and my weight has always tied in with that. However, I know it's just something that I'm gonna have to get over because otherwise I'll never change. Thanks for replying, it's so helpful.
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silverflowers
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(Original post by londonmyst)
Do you have a target weight or specific clothes size that you are hoping to achieve?

I've been helping an obese hate crime survivor to lose weight over lockdown through controlling dietary intake, brief daily exercise workouts and swimming a couple of times a week.

She's gone down eight dress sizes, is more physically capable and looks healthier.
Homecooked meals served in reasonable portion sizes, no greasy takeaways, lots of still water and giving small fresh salads/fruit/nuts instead of crisps or chocolate.
I do! I'd love to be about 70-75kg, which is at the top end of a healthy weight for my height, and I'm guessing about a size 12. The ultimate goal would be to weight less than that and be a size 10, but to be honest I think I will always eat a little too much chocolate, but as long as I'm healthy then I can deal with that.

Wow 8 dress sizes is amazing, I can't believe I'm struggling so much with 2 haha (although to be honest I think I'm almost an 18 right now, so 3). I've heard a lot of people say drinking water is really helpful, do you know why?

Thanks so much!
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silverflowers
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(Original post by Chopinnocturne31)
I don’t have any more advice for you other than what has already been said but I’m watching this thread because I’d love to support you through this! I hope you post updates but no pressure of course 😊❤️
Aww thank you! I really hope that I can actually manage this, and I'll try my best to lose enough worthy of posting updates about!
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Reality Check
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(Original post by silverflowers)
Hi! Thanks for replying!
I can't remember exactly but around the first 10kg I put back on really really quick, like 2 months, the rest went on in a good few months afterwards.

I'm going to try my best to repeat what I did the first time, but I just feel that so much of my life is centered around thinking about how much I weigh and therefore food that even just trying to live a healthier lifestyle was just this thing that I was constantly thinking about, so if I ate chocolate with my friends I'd feel so bad I'd just give up for a week. I'm definitely not going to let Christmas throw me off like it did before, I got given all of this chocolate by relatives I barely see but now I've realised that that doesn't actually mean I have to eat it, I can just give it to somebody.

My mum is a self described hippie, so she's just not a fan of processed things and such, so it's probably not as bad as it sounds. But I do think that all or nothing thing might have been something I did create for myself (nothing that my family have done).

Thanks so much for your help, I'll really try and take everything on board.
Yes, it's not uncommon to regain weight very rapidly, particularly if you've got the mindset of 'throwing the towel in', so to speak (which a lot of people who've fallen off the wagon do). Have you heard of the Stages of Change model? It's this:

Name:  the-stages-of-change-2794868-01-1cbf04c4db034a809663a7db18a47921.png
Views: 21
Size:  127.2 KB

It's very relevant in behaviour change where food is concerned (and a lot of other habit-based behaviours too). It's important to note two things from it. Firstly, that you can enter and leave this cycle at any stage. Secondly, and more importantly, relapse is a normal part of behaviour change. People often think that 'failing' at something means you can't do it again, or can never do it 'properly', but it's important to note that relapsing is a normal part of successful behaviour change. Look at what you could learn from your last weight loss cycle and see how you might do things differently to make it better. For instance, is there anything you could do to move your thinking away from how much you currently weight to how much you couldweigh, basing that on the evidence of what happened before. Do you have any of your 'thin' clothes still? Hang them up and use them as a motivation - you will get back into them.
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BurstingBubbles
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Hey I'm 5'8 too and have gone from 78kg (overweight) to 64kg (bang in the middle of ideal BMI). I was 74kg at Christmas and just hit the 64kg so I lost the 10kg gradually over 7 months. I've used My Fitness Pal to keep track of what I've been eating. Sadly there's no easy way to lose weight than to eat less calories than you burn. Try going 500 cals under what you burn e.g. if you burn 2,000 cals, eat 1,500 - this should equal 1 pound loss a weight on average. Make sure you're eating enough protein too - you don't want to end up 'skinny fat' and protein fills us up for longer!

As I'm sure you know, there's no quick long term fix, be consistent and stick with it. Following this thread for updates! Good luck
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Compost
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Yes, it's not uncommon to regain weight very rapidly, particularly if you've got the mindset of 'throwing the towel in', so to speak (which a lot of people who've fallen off the wagon do). Have you heard of the Stages of Change model? It's this:

Name:  the-stages-of-change-2794868-01-1cbf04c4db034a809663a7db18a47921.png
Views: 21
Size:  127.2 KB

It's very relevant in behaviour change where food is concerned (and a lot of other habit-based behaviours too). It's important to note two things from it. Firstly, that you can enter and leave this cycle at any stage. Secondly, and more importantly, relapse is a normal part of behaviour change. People often think that 'failing' at something means you can't do it again, or can never do it 'properly', but it's important to note that relapsing is a normal part of successful behaviour change. Look at what you could learn from your last weight loss cycle and see how you might do things differently to make it better. For instance, is there anything you could do to move your thinking away from how much you currently weight to how much you could weigh, basing that on the evidence of what happened before. Do you have any of your 'thin' clothes still? Hang them up and use them as a motivation - you will get back into them.
PRSOM
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londonmyst
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(Original post by silverflowers)
I do! I'd love to be about 70-75kg, which is at the top end of a healthy weight for my height, and I'm guessing about a size 12. The ultimate goal would be to weight less than that and be a size 10, but to be honest I think I will always eat a little too much chocolate, but as long as I'm healthy then I can deal with that.

Wow 8 dress sizes is amazing, I can't believe I'm struggling so much with 2 haha (although to be honest I think I'm almost an 18 right now, so 3). I've heard a lot of people say drinking water is really helpful, do you know why?

Thanks so much!
Have you considered making your own chocolate and learning how to make a few vegan chocolates?
I drink plenty of water and always recommend this to people who want to either lose weight or consume fewer drinks that include caffeine/sugar/booze.
Drinking unflavoured still water helps keep the body hydrated and avoids falling back into old unhealthy diet habits often involving milkshakes, fizzy & high calorie drinks.
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josie71202
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my parents said weight loss is 60%diet and 40% exercise. Also have a lot of lettuce it's surprisingly filling
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UnwantedKid
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(Original post by londonmyst)
Have you considered making your own chocolate and learning how to make a few vegan chocolates?
Can you recommend any good recipes? I'm very curious about this. I'm not the biggest fan of chocolate, I can live without it, but sometimes the cravings pop up
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UnwantedKid
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(Original post by josie71202)
my parents said weight loss is 60%diet and 40% exercise. Also have a lot of lettuce it's surprisingly filling
More 80% diet 20% nutrition. It's possible to lose weight while beine more or less sedentary with a calorie deficit. Problem is how you look and feel after if you do no exercise/don't do weights but lose weight. Though of course burning more calories through exercise is there too.
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josie71202
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(Original post by gigaberry)
Can you recommend any good recipes? I'm very curious about this. I'm not the biggest fan of chocolate, I can live without it, but sometimes the cravings pop up
https://thethingswellmake.com/easy-h...s-vegan-paleo/
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UnwantedKid
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<3
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josie71202
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(Original post by gigaberry)
More 80% diet 20% nutrition. It's possible to lose weight while beine more or less sedentary with a calorie deficit. Problem is how you look and feel after if you do no exercise/don't do weights but lose weight. Though of course burning more calories through exercise is there too.
yeah that makes sense

also good on you OP for doing something about your weight
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KelsieTaylor
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Good luck!
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