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What is Gibraltar's relationship with the UK? watch

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    I know Gibraltar's status has been an ongoing dispute for years with the Spanish, but what is the current status of Gibraltar? I understand that most Gibraltarians want to stay part of Britian, but is Gibraltar technically part of the UK? Is Gibraltar considered a foreign country, or is someone in Gibraltar technically in the UK? Are citizens of Gibraltar also full citizens of the UK and thus have UK passports? Are British services, such as the NHS, Royal Mail, etc, also in Gibraltar? Do Gibraltarians have the right to vote in UK elections? How are they represented politically in the UK?

    Also, is a flight from the UK to Gibraltar considered an Internal flight, or still an International flight? Is the relationship between the UK and Gibraltar comparable of that between the USA and Puerto Rico?

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    Gibraltar, like the Falklands, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands etc, is a British Overseas Territory. Effectively a new branding for a colony - albeit these days colonies have rather better arrangements.

    Gibraltar is not a 'foreign country' (then again, technically the Commonwealth and Ireland are not 'foreign' to us) - but it is not in the UK. It is a possession of the UK.

    Gibraltar has a Governor (appointed effectively by the UK Government) and a Parliament, which elects a Chief Minister. In Home Affairs, it is effectively self-governing: Britain takes responsibility for things like defence and foreign affairs despite the fact Gibraltar does not elect members to the UK Parliament (which I think is rather disgraceful). In theory, when Britain is making decisions for Gibraltar, they will consult the Gib Parliament, Chief Minister and Governor.

    Gibraltarians are not automatically British citizens, but rather British overseas territories citizens with 'belonger status' to Gibraltar. They can however register and are automatically given British citizenship (ie, it cannot be refused). There are Gibraltar passports - which are almost identical to normal British passports - you can see one here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gibraltar_passport

    Gibraltar has its own health service and post service (the Royal Gibraltar Post Office) although in effect these will be very similar to Britain (same red post boxes etc).

    A flight to Gib will be considered an international flight. Yes, its relationship is broadly like that between the USA and Puerto Rico, but there are plenty of minor differences.
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    It's a strange concept really. So when one is in Gibraltar, while one is not actually in the UK, he is still in British territory and thus entitled to protection and assistance from the British government. It's difficult to whether it's Gibraltar, or Britian. Because while you are in Gibraltar, you're still in British territory, and thus not a foreign country, so in a broader sense, you're still in Britian? It boggles the mind, lol.

    Is it also like the situation between Hong Kong (which ironically used to be British) and China, as Hong Kongers are technically Chinese citizens, with the right to abode in Hong Kong, so not actual citizens of Mainland China. And Hong Kong also has it's own political system, laws, etc. Yet China is still in charge of it's foreign affairs, etc.
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    I went to Gibraltar recently, brilliant run as usual, however it might as well be spanish now as the only brits or brit looking types i saw there, were holidaymakers. everyone else was spanish. including a gang of about 200 youths who would ride around on mo-peds starting fights with sailors, one lad even got his thigh slashed by a blade wielded by a youth on a passing moped. :laughing:

    Perhaps a secret plan by the spanish to infiltrate and take back Gib via Hells Angels....on mopeds.
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    The Gibraltarian people have always been quite ethnically diverse, with plenty of separate European origins - you can typically tell that from their surnames, look at the list of Chief Ministers: Hassan, Peliza, Canepa, Bossano and now Caruana. Also, unlike the UK, most of the population are Catholic (78%, with only 7% Anglican, and 4% Muslim)

    Equally, you'll go to other British Overseas Territories and find the population almost entirely black.

    To confuse Britishness with being a White, Anglo-Saxon Protestant is, to my mind, demonstrably wrong, particularly in the territories. British National Party and their fellow travellers, take note.
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    (Original post by donmcl777)
    I went to Gibraltar recently, brilliant run as usual, however it might as well be spanish now as the only brits or brit looking types i saw there, were holidaymakers. everyone else was spanish. including a gang of about 200 youths who would ride around on mo-peds starting fights with sailors, one lad even got his thigh slashed by a blade wielded by a youth on a passing moped. :laughing:

    Perhaps a secret plan by the spanish to infiltrate and take back Gib via Hells Angels....on mopeds.
    The majority of Gibraltarians speak very good English though and there's quite a lot of British people living and working there.
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    (Original post by Belle-x)
    The majority of Gibraltarians speak very good English though and there's quite a lot of British people living and working there.


    Thats True. and dont get me wrong the majority of Gibraltarians are very nice people, its just those mental youths, i mean do they live there or do they come over the border?
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    (Original post by donmcl777)
    Thats True. and dont get me wrong the majority of Gibraltarians are very nice people, its just those mental youths, i mean do they live there or do they come over the border?
    I think everyone has a scooter in Gibraltar! My brother and his wife live there and I stayed there for a month this summer. The majority of teenage boys in Gib are chavs, they're mental.
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    (Original post by Belle-x)
    I think everyone has a scooter in Gibraltar! My brother and his wife live there and I stayed there for a month this summer. The majority of teenage boys in Gib are chavs, they're mental.

    Tell me about it i was leaving the angry friar, slightly worse for wear and there was about 5 of them just waiting outside. i had to curl up into a ball to protect my beautiful face, one of my friends wasnt so lucky, he had one of his teeth punched out!
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    Basically, Gibraltar is our *****. :p:
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    (Original post by L i b)
    Gibraltar, like the Falklands, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands etc, is a British Overseas Territory. Effectively a new branding for a colony - albeit these days colonies have rather better arrangements.

    Gibraltar is not a 'foreign country' (then again, technically the Commonwealth and Ireland are not 'foreign' to us) - but it is not in the UK. It is a possession of the UK.

    Gibraltar has a Governor (appointed effectively by the UK Government) and a Parliament, which elects a Chief Minister. In Home Affairs, it is effectively self-governing: Britain takes responsibility for things like defence and foreign affairs despite the fact Gibraltar does not elect members to the UK Parliament (which I think is rather disgraceful). In theory, when Britain is making decisions for Gibraltar, they will consult the Gib Parliament, Chief Minister and Governor.

    Gibraltarians are not automatically British citizens, but rather British overseas territories citizens with 'belonger status' to Gibraltar. They can however register and are automatically given British citizenship (ie, it cannot be refused). There are Gibraltar passports - which are almost identical to normal British passports - you can see one here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gibraltar_passport

    Gibraltar has its own health service and post service (the Royal Gibraltar Post Office) although in effect these will be very similar to Britain (same red post boxes etc).

    A flight to Gib will be considered an international flight. Yes, its relationship is broadly like that between the USA and Puerto Rico, but there are plenty of minor differences.
    Spot on.

    (Original post by L i b)
    The Gibraltarian people have always been quite ethnically diverse, with plenty of separate European origins - you can typically tell that from their surnames, look at the list of Chief Ministers: Hassan, Peliza, Canepa, Bossano and now Caruana. Also, unlike the UK, most of the population are Catholic (78%, with only 7% Anglican, and 4% Muslim)
    Were are often confused for Spaniards but the fact is that the Gibraltar community is drawn from a myriad of (mainly) Mediterranean ethnicities; British, Genoese, Portuguese, Maltese, Spanish, and Jewish, among other origins.

    Gibraltar is a nice place; it was recently voted the fifth most stable and prosperous country in the world and has a remarkably low crime rate (so all this talk of crazy youths sounds a little far-fetched!)

    The Governor’s role is limited to self-defence and security but his role is effectively a ceremonial one. He doesn’t figure in local politics and the decision-making boils down to the Gibraltar Parliament.

    As mentioned above, Gibraltar is not part of the UK but does vote in elections for the European Parliament as part of the part of the South West England region (until 2004 this right was very shamefully denied until the issue was taken up to the ECHR)

    To give a sense of some cultural proximity to the UK: I’ll be starting my A-levels next week (as supplied and marked by the same exam boards), may turn on the BBC now and perhaps pop down to Morrisons tomorrow.
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    (Original post by donmcl777)
    Tell me about it i was leaving the angry friar, slightly worse for wear and there was about 5 of them just waiting outside. i had to curl up into a ball to protect my beautiful face, one of my friends wasnt so lucky, he had one of his teeth punched out!
    lol..I didn't think it was that bad. The crime rates are low in Gibraltar!
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    (Original post by RedCoat1510)
    To give a sense of some cultural proximity to the UK: I’ll be starting my A-levels next week (as supplied and marked by the same exam boards), may turn on the BBC now and perhaps pop down to Morrisons tomorrow.
    No afternoon tea and Pimm's down at the cricket field? :p:

    How's the military presence on Gib these days? I imagine it's quite noticeable?
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    (Original post by RedCoat1510)
    Spot on.


    Gibraltar is a nice place; it was recently voted the fifth most stable and prosperous country in the world and has a remarkably low crime rate (so all this talk of crazy youths sounds a little far-fetched!)

    .

    I promise you it isnt, but maybe the amount of drunk matelots stumbling around might have provoked them a little
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    (Original post by L i b)
    No afternoon tea and Pimm's down at the cricket field? :p:

    How's the military presence on Gib these days? I imagine it's quite noticeable?
    Lol, of course.

    Since 1991 the military presence has been overwhelmingly reduced. Old photographs show Main Street jam-packed with marines and other British Army servicemen, a scene virtually indistinguishable from the present.

    Nevertheless, Gib does receive the odd ship. Last month there was an American nuclear submarine in port for a couple of days, USS Dallas, during which time you could hear the occasional babble of American voices in town. More often than not though, the ships tend to be cruise ships.

    The arrival of a nuclear-powered submarine doesn’t come without the whinge of a few Spanish ecologists who delight in stirring it up in an attempt at discrediting Gibraltar for obviously political reasons. Strangely enough, they don’t complain when submarines turn up at Rota, the largest U.S. naval base in Spain, or when their nuclear power plants cause problems.
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    http://news.bbc.co.uk/media/video/38...arshall_vi.ram
 
 
 
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