somedude95
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Hi, I am a foreigner in the UK doing my FY1 currently, I want to apply for GP training next year. Due to my identity, I cannot stay outside of the UK for too long if I want to eventually gain the indefinite leave to remain, so the best case for me is something like finishing FY2 in July and starting GPST1 in August of the same year. I am not sure about the timeline and their recruitment website offers very vague ideas so I thought I would ask here from some experienced people. Thank you!
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Democracy
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(Original post by somedude95)
Hi, I am a foreigner in the UK doing my FY1 currently, I want to apply for GP training next year. Due to my identity, I cannot stay outside of the UK for too long if I want to eventually gain the indefinite leave to remain, so the best case for me is something like finishing FY2 in July and starting GPST1 in August of the same year. I am not sure about the timeline and their recruitment website offers very vague ideas so I thought I would ask here from some experienced people. Thank you!
You can apply in November of FY2 i.e. 3 months after you've started.

MSRA is in January
Offers are in March - if you score highly enough in the MSRA you can bypass the interview stage and get an offer directly
Getting your job allocations is probably deanery specific but I got mine at the end of April
Start in August

Timelines are here, though they may not be updated for August 2021 entry yet: https://gprecruitment.hee.nhs.uk/Recruitment
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somedude95
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(Original post by Democracy)
You can apply in November of FY2 i.e. 3 months after you've started.

MSRA is in January
Offers are in March - if you score highly enough in the MSRA you can bypass the interview stage and get an offer directly
Getting your job allocations is probably deanery specific but I got mine at the end of April
Start in August

Timelines are here, though they may not be updated for August 2021 entry yet: https://gprecruitment.hee.nhs.uk/Recruitment
Congrats, so did you skip interview stage? What are the resources you used to prep MSRA SJT and Clinical?
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Democracy
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(Original post by somedude95)
Congrats, so did you skip interview stage? What are the resources you used to prep MSRA SJT and Clinical?
I did. Used PassMedicine for the MSRA.

There are some MSRA experiences here:

https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5202178
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somedude95
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(Original post by Democracy)
I did. Used PassMedicine for the MSRA.

There are some MSRA experiences here:

https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?ti
I used pass medicine before FY1 SJT but I felt like their questions weren’t really relevant to the real exam questions, I felt it that way and so did the people in the discussions. Did you really use pass medicine as your only revision source for the MSRA SJT? how about pastest?
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Democracy
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(Original post by somedude95)
I used pass medicine before FY1 SJT but I felt like their questions weren’t really relevant to the real exam questions, I felt it that way and so did the people in the discussions. Did you really use pass medicine as your only revision source for the MSRA SJT? how about pastest?
Honestly I think 90% of my revision was for the Clinical Problem Solving questions. I did a load of Professional Dilemma (=SJT) questions in the two days before the exam but I derive little benefit from "revising" for SJTs, I really only did it to familiarise myself with the format and to get into the SJT mindset, so for that PassMedicine was absolutely fine.

No idea about PasTest sorry.
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somedude95
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(Original post by Democracy)
Honestly I think 90% of my revision was for the Clinical Problem Solving questions. I did a load of Professional Dilemma (=SJT) questions in the two days before the exam but I derive little benefit from "revising" for SJTs, I really only did it to familiarise myself with the format and to get into the SJT mindset, so for that PassMedicine was absolutely fine.

No idea about PasTest sorry.
Was gonna make a new post but I thought you know quite a lot so I will ask it here. When I fully qualify as a GP, what is the minimum requirement to do to keep up the licence to practice? i.e. number of hours to work per year, etc etc.
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(Original post by somedude95)
Was gonna make a new post but I thought you know quite a lot so I will ask it here. When I fully qualify as a GP, what is the minimum requirement to do to keep up the licence to practice? i.e. number of hours to work per year, etc etc.
I don't think there is a minimum requirement:

Spoiler:
Show
Myth: I need to undertake a minimum number of GP sessions to revalidate

Revalidation assesses your fitness to practise as a doctor. There are no GMC requirements that relate to the number of sessions you need to work in any role. You need to be confident that you can demonstrate that you practise safely in every role you undertake, not matter how little of that work you do.

For any part of your scope of practice, no matter how little time is spent on it, the GMC expects you to reflect on how you:

- keep up-to-date at what you do
- review your practice and ensure that you can demonstrate that it remains safe
- seek out and respond to feedback from colleagues and patients about what you do.

There will always be times when doctors have a significant break from practice, for good reason, such as maternity or parental leave, sickness or sabbaticals, among others. Your designated body will have mechanisms in place for agreeing to postpone your appraisal, or even agreeing an 'approved missed' appraisal. Approved breaks in practice should be considered separately from doctors doing low volumes of clinical work on an on-going basis.

If necessary, your responsible officer (RO) has the option of deferring your revalidation recommendation to allow more time to collect the supporting information you need. If you have been out of practice entirely for more than two years, you will need to do a refresher course: the Induction and Refresher Scheme in England, Northern Ireland and Wales and the GP Returner Scheme in England, Northern Ireland and Wales and the GP Returner Scheme is Scotland. Approved breaks in practice should be considered separately from doctors doing low volumes of clinical work on an ongoing basis.



https://www.rcgp.org.uk/training-exa...f-doctors.aspx

GANFYD - is the above true in your experience?
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GANFYD
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(Original post by Democracy)
I don't think there is a minimum requirement:

Spoiler:
Show
Myth: I need to undertake a minimum number of GP sessions to revalidate

Revalidation assesses your fitness to practise as a doctor. There are no GMC requirements that relate to the number of sessions you need to work in any role. You need to be confident that you can demonstrate that you practise safely in every role you undertake, not matter how little of that work you do.

For any part of your scope of practice, no matter how little time is spent on it, the GMC expects you to reflect on how you:

- keep up-to-date at what you do
- review your practice and ensure that you can demonstrate that it remains safe
- seek out and respond to feedback from colleagues and patients about what you do.

There will always be times when doctors have a significant break from practice, for good reason, such as maternity or parental leave, sickness or sabbaticals, among others. Your designated body will have mechanisms in place for agreeing to postpone your appraisal, or even agreeing an 'approved missed' appraisal. Approved breaks in practice should be considered separately from doctors doing low volumes of clinical work on an on-going basis.

If necessary, your responsible officer (RO) has the option of deferring your revalidation recommendation to allow more time to collect the supporting information you need. If you have been out of practice entirely for more than two years, you will need to do a refresher course: the Induction and Refresher Scheme in England, Northern Ireland and Wales and the GP Returner Scheme in England, Northern Ireland and Wales and the GP Returner Scheme is Scotland. Approved breaks in practice should be considered separately from doctors doing low volumes of clinical work on an ongoing basis.



https://www.rcgp.org.uk/training-exa...f-doctors.aspx

GANFYD - is the above true in your experience?
I certainly know people who only do 2 sessions in actual General Practice and some with annualised hours. Some do nothing else, some have other medical roles. I do not think there is a minimum requirement in terms of hours, but it will be hard to get MSFs, training etc, if you work much less, I would have thought.
Other than that it is minimum 50 hours CPD a year, +/- relevant training for any specific roles you do (can be part of the 50 hours if needed), eg FSRH if doing coils etc, minor surgery competencies, Teaching the Teacher stuff if you have med students, Trainer stuff if GPSTs,
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somedude95
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So is it 50 hours annually minimum? I heard the minimum is 40 sessions per year
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Democracy
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(Original post by somedude95)
So is it 50 hours annually minimum? I heard the minimum is 40 sessions per year
50 hours is for CPD activities - that's not the same as clinical sessions at work, which is what I thought you were asking about?
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GANFYD
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(Original post by somedude95)
So is it 50 hours annually minimum? I heard the minimum is 40 sessions per year
Have a read here
https://www.england.nhs.uk/publicati...clinical-work/

I think more of an issue would be finding someone to employ you for 40 sessions a year or feeling confident enough to locum for only that length of time, as you would rapidly de-skill, let alone the financial implications
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Helenia
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(Original post by somedude95)
So is it 50 hours annually minimum? I heard the minimum is 40 sessions per year
50 hours is the CPD requirement, not the clinical commitment
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somedude95
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(Original post by Democracy)
50 hours is for CPD activities - that's not the same as clinical sessions at work, which is what I thought you were asking about?
(Original post by GANFYD)
Have a read here
https://www.england.nhs.uk/publicati...clinical-work/

I think more of an issue would be finding someone to employ you for 40 sessions a year or feeling confident enough to locum for only that length of time, as you would rapidly de-skill, let alone the financial implications
(Original post by Helenia)
50 hours is the CPD requirement, not the clinical commitment
So CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development right, what does it include? Do you have to have this 50 hours annually in order to progress?
I agree with rapidly de-skilling, but I guess there is no such thing as a perfect decision, GP amongst all doctors already has the most flexibility in terms of taking time out to do other things
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Democracy
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(Original post by somedude95)
So CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development right, what does it include? Do you have to have this 50 hours annually in order to progress?
I agree with rapidly de-skilling, but I guess there is no such thing as a perfect decision, GP amongst all doctors already has the most flexibility in terms of taking time out to do other things
CPD (in the sense of collecting x number of hours) is something you have to do as part of annual appraisal and revalidation once you have finished training.
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GANFYD
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(Original post by somedude95)
So CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development right, what does it include? Do you have to have this 50 hours annually in order to progress?
I agree with rapidly de-skilling, but I guess there is no such thing as a perfect decision, GP amongst all doctors already has the most flexibility in terms of taking time out to do other things
Yes. You agree with your Appraiser what some of the content will be when you set your PDP (personal development plan), some of it is compulsory (Basic Life Support, E&D, Data Protection adn a million and 1 other "usefull" things), the rest is down to you.
As stated, yes, you have to make this annually in order to be revalidated and hence continue as a GP
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somedude95
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(Original post by GANFYD)
Yes. You agree with your Appraiser what some of the content will be when you set your PDP (personal development plan), some of it is compulsory (Basic Life Support, E&D, Data Protection adn a million and 1 other "usefull" things), the rest is down to you.
As stated, yes, you have to make this annually in order to be revalidated and hence continue as a GP
What happens when you set your PDP? Do you have to demonstrate the skills in the PDP?
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GANFYD
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(Original post by somedude95)
What happens when you set your PDP? Do you have to demonstrate the skills in the PDP?
Yes, that is the point. You agree a plan with outcomes and then work towards it during the next year and then produce evidence you have achieved your learning objectives at the next appraisal
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somedude95
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(Original post by GANFYD)
Yes, that is the point. You agree a plan with outcomes and then work towards it during the next year and then produce evidence you have achieved your learning objectives at the next appraisal
I am thinking once I qualify as a GP I will do locuming for as much as I can because if you are still undertaking GP work you belong to the 'lower risk' group which only requires minimal mitigation/safeguards. Do you know how locuming work? Is it usually like a contract where you are fixed on working a certain period or it is completely up to you to work how many sessions, what days and time?
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