Pressure in Rates of Reaction Question?

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M.Johnson2111
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Hi,

I'm attempting a Rates question and have been given the concentration and pressure.

Since pressure increases the rate do I multiply the concentration by the pressure?

Also the pressure is in kPa, would I have to convert this to Pa?

Thank you :}
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Pigster
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(Original post by M.Johnson2111)
Hi,

I'm attempting a Rates question and have been given the concentration and pressure.

Since pressure increases the rate do I multiply the concentration by the pressure?

Also the pressure is in kPa, would I have to convert this to Pa?

Thank you :}
Can you post the Q?
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M.Johnson2111
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The questions attached
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Pigster
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(Original post by M.Johnson2111)
The questions attached
There is no mention of pressure.

Have you studied weak acids? Do you know how to work out pH of a weak acid and hence work out [H+] from pH?
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M.Johnson2111
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(Original post by Pigster)
There is no mention of pressure.

Have you studied weak acids? Do you know how to work out pH of a weak acid and hence work out [H+] from pH?
I assumed pKa was pressure?
Not yet this is preparation work for my second year of A-Level
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Pigster
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(Original post by M.Johnson2111)
I assumed pKa was pressure?
Not yet this is preparation work for my second year of A-Level
kPa would be kilopascals.

pKa is a way of expressing the strength of a weak acid.
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M.Johnson2111
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(Original post by Pigster)
kPa would be kilopascals.

pKa is a way of expressing the strength of a weak acid.
Ah thank you, I'll look up on this
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M.Johnson2111
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So since its a weak acid there'll be a high PH which means a high concentration of H+ ions. So an increased rate of reaction. How do I use this to answer the question?
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Pigster
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(Original post by M.Johnson2111)
So since its a weak acid there'll be a high PH which means a high concentration of H+ ions. So an increased rate of reaction. How do I use this to answer the question?
Weak acids have lower [H+] than strong acids (of the same concentration).

You know the order WRT [H+]. You'll calculate how [H+] changes when swapping the acid. I'll bet it is a simple comparison, e.g. [H+] will be 0.1x what it used to be and hence rate will be 0.1orderx the old value.
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M.Johnson2111
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(Original post by Pigster)
Weak acids have lower [H+] than strong acids (of the same concentration).

You know the order WRT [H+]. You'll calculate how [H+] changes when swapping the acid. I'll bet it is a simple comparison, e.g. [H+] will be 0.1x what it used to be and hence rate will be 0.1orderx the old value.
Thank you
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