bluewolf21's Student Laptop Guide (last updated September 2020)

Watch
bluewolf21
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
bluewolf21's Student Laptop Guide

Introduction notes
  • This guide is aimed at helping most students picking a laptop. This should not be interpreted as the be-all-end-all advice, rather as a general guide.
  • If you still need help picking a laptop, feel free to comment on this thread, PM me, or start your own thread.
  • If you want recommendations, please look at this form as it makes it easier to recommend a laptop that suits your needs well. If you're not going to use the form, though, please at the very least state the software that you intend to run as well as your budget.
  • My primary advice is bold in blue for emphasis. The extra information that I've added on is either an expansion of that point or an explanation as to why I've given that advice.

Operating System
  • Windows 10 – the most common operating system, and the one to go for if you're unsure. Advantages are better software support, better hardware support and it often comes preloaded on a lot of systems. The disadvantage is that it is more prone to viruses than others, though common sense and the built-in Windows Defender take care of this.
  • As it's free and quick to come out of it, I wouldn't recommend discounting laptops with Windows 10 S or to go by its other name, Windows 10 S mode as for the sake of the 5 minutes it takes to come out of it, it's not worth restricting your hardware options. For those who are wondering on how to switch out of Windows 10 S, it's worth looking at this guide from Microsoft.
  • macOS – this is the one you will find on Apple's Mac computers. The advantage of this one is the deep integration with other Apple Products(e.g. iPhone, iPad), whilst the disadvantage is that you are restricted to Apple’s own hardware, which generally costs a lot of money and commonly has some shortcomings, such as the limited ports and lack of any real kind of upgradability.
  • I would personally avoid buying a MacBook the current Intel-based Macs are likely going to lose their support once Apple is done with the transition, whilst the upcoming Apple Silicon MacBooks are likely going to have issues with software support. For those who really want one, or need certain software only available on macOS, however, the best course of action is to wait for the Apple Silicon MacBooks to be released as whilst they will have issues, for most people the longevity that would be offered by one will outweigh the software support issues.
  • Linux – Advantages are that it is free and there's generally more customizability compared to Windows, macOS and Chrome OS. Disadvantages are that support for your hardware isn't guaranteed, and the software you may need to run for your course isn’t guaranteed to be available. If you are interested in this one, I would create a thread for laptops with good Linux support.
  • Chrome OS – Advantages are that it is quite fast, even on low-end hardware, however, the main disadvantage of this one is the relatively poor software support, hence why I generally don't recommend them unless you're on a tight budget.

Display
  • If you're unsure which screen size to go for, I would personally recommend getting a 14” laptop as it offers the best balance of having something that provides enough screen for real work, whilst also being fairly small and often light to put into a bag.
  • 13.3 inches – Typically found in smaller laptops like the 13.3" MacBooks, these are good if getting something small as possible is one of your main priorities, but while the physical difference between a 14" laptop and a 13.3" laptop often isn't that big, you will the extra screen real estate quite a bit.
  • 14 inches – Generally a nice balance of being small to put into a bag, whilst having enough room to get real work done.
  • 15.6 inches – Generally better for media consumption, and for people who value screen real estate, but do keep in mind that these laptops come with the compromise of generally being a bit bigger and heavier to carry around all day, though not drastically so.
  • 17.3 inches – great if you want something that you can just leave at home with tons of screen real estate, but you will likely have a hard time getting a laptop of this size into a bag, and if you can it’d likely be too heavy.
  • Size is subjective, and which size is best for you comes down to personal preference. When we're not in the middle of a pandemic, it's worth going into a store and checking whether you get along with a particular size. Additionally, you can also use the size of an existing laptop that you already own to base your decision.
  • I would avoid screens with low resolutions like 1366x768 and jump up to 1080p if you can help it. Laptop Mag did a really good article on the matter here, but the TLDR is that things will look flat out worse and with 1080p screens being fairly common across most price points, it's quite hard to recommend a laptop with a lower resolution.

Processor
  • Most people should aim for something with at least an 8th gen i5 or newer (i.e. 1035G1), or an AMD Ryzen 5 CPU(i.e. 4500U). These CPUs offer generally better performance across the board, and with more developers taking advantage of the extra cores offered by newer CPUs, they will likely offer better longevity than a lower grade CPU, or an older 7th gen CPU.
  • Ideally, if you're going to go with an AMD processor, I'd aim for a 6 core CPU such as the 4500U as these generally offer better performance at often similar price points to laptops with older 3000 and 2000 series CPUs, as well as their Intel counterparts. That said, the older 3000/2000 series Ryzen 5 and Ryzen 7 CPUs are still going to be good enough for most students, so these aren't worth avoiding.
  • Avoid older 7th Gen Intel Core Processors, as well as lower-end Core i3 and 3000/2000 series AMD Ryzen 3s(such as the 3200U). This is because these are dual-core CPUs, which while perfectly sufficient for lighter tasks, these offer less multi-tasking headroom and with more developers taking advantage of the extra cores in new systems, they will likely offer worse longevity compared to newer 8th gen or newer i5/i7 processor, or an AMD Ryzen 5 or above.
  • The processor generation can be determined by the first or first two number(s) in the CPU model, e.g. the 8265u is an 8th gen processor, the 1035G1 is a 10th gen processor, etc.
  • Be careful when using the filters in an online store/sorting tool. While not that many places sell systems with older processors these days, they can still be found now and again. Most stores don't separate processors by generations, which means that older 7th gen processors might be lumped in with newer 8th & 10th generation processors,

Graphics Card
  • Don’t get a laptop with dedicated graphics if you will just be doing tasks like writing essays, watching movies, TV shows, YouTube etc., and likely video conferencing, as these often come at the expense of things like battery life and portability, and often with gaming laptops, fan noise. While there are exceptions to those downsides like the ASUS Zephyrus G14, or the Dell XPS 15, it is safe to say most people should skip over this.
  • Do get a laptop with dedicated graphics if you will be doing something like Engineering, will be using a lot of Photo & Video Editing software, and/or plan on gaming as the dedicated graphics will likely come in handy, especially for engineering in which you’ll be running CAD software like SolidWorks, which really benefits from the extra graphical power provided by the GPU.
  • If you will be doing something where you'll be using a lot of Photo/Video editing software such as Photoshop and Premiere, I'd go for something with an MX Card as while these aren't great for gaming or CAD, for the things that you will be doing they will provide you with enough power without compromising on things like battery life. I'd go for this Lenovo Ideapad S540 with an i5-8265u and an MX250 on the budget end, or this ASUS ZenBook with an AMD Ryzen 4700U and an MX350 on the more premium end.
  • For engineering, I would get something with a more powerful GTX/RTX Card (i.e. GTX 1650), or an AMD RX5500M+ as while the MX cards are good for stuff like Photo and Video editing, they are not so good for the CAD Software which you will be using. I would personally pick this Acer Aspire 7 on the budget end of the Asus G14 on the premium end.

RAM
  • If you can afford it, I would strongly recommend getting something with 8GB as this will run a bit quicker, you'll often be able to run more apps on your laptop at once, and besides it’s fairly cheap to jump up to 8GB anyway.
  • For most people, though, 4GB would be serviceable, just expect some general slowdowns, especially when multitasking.

Storage Space
  • 128GB is the minimum amount of storage for most people, however, if you can afford it, I would recommend getting 256GB as at least on full-blown OSes like Windows or macOS, as you start installing apps you will find that you start to run out of storage pretty quickly on anything lower than that.
  • If you can help it, get a secondary storage solution like a USB stick, cloud storage, or an external hard drive instead of getting a laptop with an internal mechanical hard drive as while mechanical hard drives will get you much more storage for less money, the performance compromise is too big for it to be something that I can comfortably recommend for most people. Plus, it's always a good idea to keep backups of your important data for if something goes wrong down the line.

Budget
  • For a laptop with the specs that I generally recommend for most people, expect to pay around £500-£600. However, a lot of people aren't going to be in a position to pay that, so I've listed some other budgets and whether they're worth shopping in.
  • £200-£300 - You can't really win in this budget. Occasionally a deal can be found that brings more usable specs into this budget, however, this isn't overly common, and wherever possible, it's worth spending the extra money as even an extra £50 can go a long way to getting something more usable.
  • £300-£400 - The vast majority of laptops in this price will certainly be serviceable for a lot of use cases, though still don't expect anything overly great. As with before, however, you can get a better computer by coming up with the extra money.
  • £400-£500 - A pretty decent price point - a lot of the laptops in this price point are worth buying, and you can get some of the specs that I recommend in this price range with deals and student discount.
  • £500-£600 - This is the price range that the laptops I recommend for most people generally fall in and can be considered as being the sweet spot between performance and value.
  • £600-£1000 - This is generally where you'll find more entry-level gaming laptops, most 2-in-1s with the specs that I recommend, and some more premium laptops.
  • £1000+ - This is basically where you'll find your more premium offerings, like the MacBook range, the Dell XPS laptops, most of the Microsoft Surface family, and the majority of Lenovo's ThinkPads. Often laptops in this price range have better build quality, better battery life, as well as somewhat lower weight and size compared to a cheaper laptop, however, you do pay a premium for this, and for a lot of people, this isn't worth it.

TLDR for most people
  • Most people should aim for a 14” traditional laptop with either an AMD Ryzen 5, or an 8th Gen or newer Intel Core i5, 8GB of RAM, a 256GB SSD, and a 1080p. This Lenovo Ideapad 5i is a solid laptop which meets all of those requirements for £500.

General Buying Advice.
  • If you can come up with the extra money for something decent (anything with at least 4GB RAM, a 128GB SSD, Pentium/Athlon), most people should just buy a brand new laptop rather than going used as the used market can be a minefield, especially if you don't know what to look for, and should really be If this is something you plan on doing, I would recommend watching this video by the 8-bit-guy as it covers some really good tips on buying a used laptop.
  • It's worth looking around at different websites for laptops as you might find a laptop that suits your needs better from one site than one from another, plus you might be able to find a better deal from another site than you can from another.
  • If you have a student discount, I strongly recommend taking advantage of this if it is available at the place you are purchasing the laptop from. This is something that you only get whilst you're in education and is certainly worth taking advantage of unless a deal brings the price down lower than what it would be with student discount.

Where to buy a laptop from?
  • Contained within the spoiler is a list of good places to buy a laptop from:

  • Buying from the manufacturer directly isn't a bad idea. Again, within the spoiler are links to the main manufacturers:
Last edited by bluewolf21; 1 day ago
13
reply
theJoyfulGeek
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
(Original post by bluewolf21)
bluewolf21's Student Laptop Guide

Introduction notes
  • This guide is aimed at helping most students picking a laptop. This should not be interpreted as the be-all-end-all advice, rather as a general guide.
  • If you still need help picking a laptop, feel free to comment on this thread, PM me, or start your own thread.
  • If you want recommendations, please look at this form as it makes it easier to recommend a laptop that suits your needs well. Failing that, please give a budget at a minimum.
  • Anything bold in blue is the main advice. Anything not in blue is the extra information(i.e. reasoning) that goes along with that.

Display
  • I would personally recommend getting a 14” laptop as it offers the best balance of having something that provides enough screen for real work, whilst also being fairly small to put into a bag.
  • 13.3 inches – Typically found in smaller laptops like the 13.3" MacBooks, these are good if getting something small as possible is a main priority, but while the difference between this and a 14” laptop isn’t drastic, the extra 0.7" still makes a bigger difference than you would think.
  • 14 inches – Generally a nice balance of being small to put into a bag, whilst having enough room to get real work done with. If you're unsure which screen size to go with, go with this one.
  • 15.6 inches – Generally better for media consumption, and for people who value screen real estate, but do keep in mind that these laptops come with the compromise of generally bigger and heavier to carry around all day.
  • 17.3 inches – great if you want something that you can just leave at home with tons of screen real estate, but you will likely have a hard time getting a laptop of this size into a bag, and if you can it’d likely be too heavy.
  • Size is subjective and comes down to personal preference at the end of the day. When we're not in the middle of a pandemic, it's worth going into a store and checking whether you get along with a particular size.
  • I would avoid screens with low resolutions like 1366x768 and jump up to 1080p if you can help it. Laptop Mag did a really good article on the matter here, but the TLDR is that things will look flat out worse and with 1080p screens being fairly common across most price points, it's quite hard to recommend a laptop with a lower resolution.


Operating System
  • Windows 10 – the most common operating system, and the one to would go for if you're unsure. Advantages are better software support, better hardware support. Disadvantages are that it is more prone to viruses than others, though common sense and the built in Windows Defender take care of this.
  • macOS – this is the one you will find on Apple's Mac computers. Advantages are deep integration with other Apple Products(e.g. iPhone, iPad), and generally good use of screen space. Disadvantages are that you are restricted to Apple’s own hardware, which generally costs a lot of money.
  • Linux – Advantages are that it is free and is generally quicker. Disadvantages are mediocre hardware support and the software you might need isn’t guaranteed to run. If you are interested in this one, I would create a thread for laptops with good Linux support.
  • Chrome OS – decent on a tight budget, however if you can come up with the extra money for a good Windows Laptop, I would pick that. Advantages are that it is quite fast on low-end hardware and has some nice tie-ins with Android (though not as many as iOS and macOS). Disadvantages are poor software support(hence why I generally don't recommend them unless you're on a tight budget), and you will be restricted to Google-sanctioned hardware (though this comes from a variety of manufacturers).


Processor/Graphics Card
  • Most people should aim for something with at least an 8th gen i5 or newer (i.e. 1035g1), or an AMD Ryzen 5 CPU. The latter should have 4 cores at a minimum (i.e. 3500u), or 6 cores if you can help it (for example, a 4500U).
  • If you can afford to do so, avoid the lower end Intel Core i3, and to a lesser extent AMD Ryzen 3 systems as while the latter has 4 cores in the latest generation, the Core i3s and older Ryzen 3s only have 2 cores, which while certainly sufficient, will make things a touch slower, and will come with the caveats of potentially shorter longevity – at the end of the day futureproofing doesn’t hurt.
  • Don’t get a laptop with dedicated graphics if you will just be doing tasks like writing essays, watching movies, TV shows, YouTube etc., and likely video conferencing, as these often come at the expense of things like battery life and portability, and often with gaming laptops, fan noise. While there are exceptions to those downsides like the ASUS G14, or the Dell XPS 15, it is safe to say most people should skip over this.
  • Do get a laptop with dedicated graphics if you will be doing something like Engineering, and to a lesser extent some creative courses like Graphic Design as the dedicated graphics will seriously come in handy, especially for engineering in which you’ll be running CAD software like SolidWorks, which really benefits from the extra graphical power provided by the GPU.
  • For the latter scenario of creative courses, something like this ASUS ZenBook with a Ryzen 4500U and a lower end MX350 will still give you enough performance for the tasks you will be doing, whilst also keeping your device relatively thin and light.
  • For engineering, I would get something with a more powerful GTX/RTX Card (i.e. GTX 1650) as while the MX cards are good for stuff like Photo and Video editing, they are not so good for CAD Software. I would personally pick this Lenovo Ideapad Gaming 3 on the budget end, or the Asus G14 on the premium end.


RAM
  • For most people 4GB is the absolute minimum amount of RAM you should pick up, however if you can afford it, I would strongly recommend getting something with 8GB of RAM as this will run a bit quicker, and besides it’s fairly cheap to jump up to 8GB anyway.
  • If you will be doing Engineering or Creative subjects, I would bump the minimum up to 8GB, as the type of apps you will be running like CAD software and the Adobe suite respectively are unlikely to run well on 4GB.


Storage Space
  • 128GB is the minimum amount of storage for most people, however again I would recommend getting 256GB if you can afford it as at least on full-blown OSes like Windows or macOS, as you start installing apps you will find that you start to run out of storage pretty quickly on anything lower than that.
  • Get a secondary storage solution like a USB stick, cloud storage, or an external hard drive instead of getting a laptop with an internal mechanical hard drive as while mechanical hard drives will get you much more storage for less money, the downside is that the computer will run a bit too slow for comfort. Plus, it's always a good idea to keep your important data in a secondary location.

TLDR for most people
  • Most people should aim for a 14” traditional laptop with either an AMD Ryzen 5, or an 8th Gen or newer Intel Core i5, 8GB of RAM, a 256GB SSD, and a 1080p display. This Lenovo Ideapad 5 fits basically all of those requirements for £530(normally £580).


General Buying Advice.
  • If you can come up with the extra money for something decent, most people should just buy a brand new laptop as the used market is a minefield, and at the time of writing prices seem to be inflated on account of working from home. However, for those who need a lot of performance for not much money, or are on a tighter budget of around £300, this is a great way to get a decent computer for not much money, though I would first recommend watching this video by the 8-bit-guy as it covers some really good tips on going this route. If anything, avoid used laptops that do not come with a charger as there is too high a chance the laptop was stolen.
  • If you have a student discount, I strongly recommend taking advantage of this if it is available at the place you are purchasing the laptop from as unless there’s a sale which brings the price down to lower than it would be with student discount, it would just be a waste of money not to.
  • Wait for back to school sales as they are a great way to save money if you are buying something for a course.
  • PSA for those looking at MacBooks – I would advise on holding out for the release of the Apple Silicon MacBooks later this year, as while they will have teething issues to start, the current Intel based MacBooks will likely suffer from a shorter life span of anywhere within the realm of 3-5 years.
  • As it's free and quick to come out of it, I wouldn't discount laptops with Windows 10 S, or to go by it's other/proper name, Windows 10 S mode. Microsoft made a guide on how to do so here.

Where to buy a laptop from?
  • Contained within the spoiler is a list of good places to buy a laptop from:

  • Buying from the manufacturer directly isn't a bad idea. Again, within the spoiler are links to the main manufacturers:
Spoiler:
Show
This is amazing - thanks! I wish I had seen something like this when choosing my laptop (which will have to last me a few more years and through at least part of uni as I got it in y11)! Thank you so much!!

Edit: What do you think of Intel Core i9, or i7 compared to i5? I currently have i7 and it actually works really well and doesn't affect battery too much, but what's i5 like?
Last edited by theJoyfulGeek; 1 month ago
1
reply
RoyalSheepy
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 month ago
#3
Excellent stuff and packed full of detail! Will sticky this in the forum

Cheers.
2
reply
bluewolf21
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#4
(Original post by theJoyfulGeek)
This is amazing - thanks! I wish I had seen something like this when choosing my laptop (which will have to last me a few more years and through at least part of uni as I got it in y11)! Thank you so much!!

Edit: What do you think of Intel Core i9, or i7 compared to i5? I currently have i7 and it actually works really well and doesn't affect battery too much, but what's i5 like?
You're welcome.

They're excellent CPUs, especially if it's something like a gaming or a multimedia laptop(i.e. Dell XPS 15) using H-class CPUs where the difference between it and the i5 is actually pretty big. That said, on thin and light laptops like the MacBook Air, and the typical £500-£600 brand new laptops, they're still good but honestly the performance difference between a Core i5 and a Core i7 is probably fairly small - though the same can't be said for their AMD Ryzen 4000 counterparts.

I would say, though, that for a lot of use cases, AMD's Ryzen 4000 CPUs are probably worth considering if you want the extra performance as these generally outperform their Intel counterparts for a lot of use cases.
Last edited by bluewolf21; 1 month ago
0
reply
bluewolf21
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#5
(Original post by RoyalSheepy)
Excellent stuff and packed full of detail! Will sticky this in the forum

Cheers.
Thank you.
0
reply
Dunnig Kruger
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 month ago
#6
1 the most important factor when deciding which laptop to buy is ~"What will you be using it for?"

2 If you will be using it for web browsing, word processing, simple spreadsheets, video conferencing then a 4th gen i5 CPU with 4GB RAM will be massive overkill. All you need is an SSD to run these applications lightning fast.

3 If you will be using it to play Far Cry 5, 6, 7 and 8 then it makes sense to get the snazziest, fastest internal bits you can get.

4 Buying used off ebay via paypal from a seller with good feedback is not a minefield. If the item isn't fully as described you simply return it for a full refund.

5 It's scare-mongering to say that laptops that come without chargers represent a too high a risk that they are stolen. Especially if you are buiying a used business laptop. In the corporate world chargers get lost all the time. Users that are leaving the organisation hand their laptops back in without the charger all the time. Because they want to keep the charger for personal use and are just following to the letter their instructions to hand their laptop and phone back in. Or the charger was routed via the cable management of their desk and they didn't think it was their job to untangle it and retrieve it.
Also Dell chargers have a habit of the outer insulation slipping off a section of the charger lead. When this happens the charger will be instantly binned by the IT Department. When collecting laptops when they are being refreshed, it's common for the laptops to be placed in 1 pile and the chargers in a separate big box. When it comes to disposal time the chargers and the laptops often get separated.

6 there are signs that the supply and demand equation on used business laptops is easing from the height of the Covid 19 crisis from May 2020. For example, good condition Dell Latitude E7470's could be bought for £180 in March 2020. In May they were up at around £250. In August prices appear to be dropping back down to £215.

7 Even at £250 a Dell Latitude E7470 represents a really good compromise between price and being a great laptop for typical (non gaming) student use. It's a premium business laptop with a well engineered magnesium alloy chassis.

8 Business laptops from HP, Lenovo and Dell are the big sellers worldwide. In years going forward, business laptops from these 3 brands will be likely to have the cheapest and most easily available spares.

9 when buying a laptop you don't need to do an extensive set of tests to check it's working. Laptops like Dell business ones have a set of inbuilt diagnostics you can run when you get the laptop. Simply set the diagnostics off and go and have lunch and come back later to see if it has passed them all and to see an indication on how healthy the battery is. Then just use the laptop as you normally would and you'll soom be aware of any faults.

10. When buying a used laptop buy one where the lettering on one or more of the keys have rubbed off, or there's an area of the space bar that looks shiney / worn only if the laptop is at the right price. If you have a choice of 2 laptops at the same price and same general condition, go for the one with the freshest looking keyboard.

11 You can get laptops for Free! All you need is a contact in an IT Department of a large organisation. Ask them if you can have any laptops they are disposing off. Especially if the laptop will be used for charitable purposes, eg helping with the local Scout Group. Even if you have to buy a new battery and an SSD hard drive to make it into a nice to use laptop that's still an investment of under £80. And you've taken a very green approach to getting your laptop.

12 All Intel and AMD based business laptops will run Linux fine. If you're a techie type, or will be studying Computer Science, run Linux. It's a technically better operating system than Windows 10. And it's a nicer environment for coding. As well as the techie brownie points for running Linux instead of Windows.

13 read descriptions on used laptops carefully. If they don't mention the screen resolution, assume it's a somewhat rubbishy 1366 x 768 resolution. This is OK on a free laptop. For a laptop you've spent money on it doesn't make sense, when you can buy a Dell E7470 for £215 that comes with an FHD 1920 screen resolution as standard.
If they don't mention the hard drive type, assume it's a slow mechanical one. In that case all you should do is allow £30 ish for buying a brand new SSD for it. Dell E7470's come with SSD's as standard.

14 Touchscreens. Do you really want fingerprints all over your screen?

15 Do not buy from Currys. Unless you really absolutely must have something today in a mega emergency. If you can wait a few days, buy elsewhere, for better deals.
3
reply
bluewolf21
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#7
(Original post by Dunnig Kruger)
1 the most important factor when deciding which laptop to buy is ~"What will you be using it for?"

2 If you will be using it for web browsing, word processing, simple spreadsheets, video conferencing then a 4th gen i5 CPU with 4GB RAM will be massive overkill. All you need is an SSD to run these applications lightning fast.

3 If you will be using it to play Far Cry 5, 6, 7 and 8 then it makes sense to get the snazziest, fastest internal bits you can get.

4 Buying used off ebay via paypal from a seller with good feedback is not a minefield. If the item isn't fully as described you simply return it for a full refund.

5 It's scare-mongering to say that laptops that come without chargers represent a too high a risk that they are stolen. Especially if you are buiying a used business laptop. In the corporate world chargers get lost all the time. Users that are leaving the organisation hand their laptops back in without the charger all the time. Because they want to keep the charger for personal use and are just following to the letter their instructions to hand their laptop and phone back in. Or the charger was routed via the cable management of their desk and they didn't think it was their job to untangle it and retrieve it.
Also Dell chargers have a habit of the outer insulation slipping off a section of the charger lead. When this happens the charger will be instantly binned by the IT Department. When collecting laptops when they are being refreshed, it's common for the laptops to be placed in 1 pile and the chargers in a separate big box. When it comes to disposal time the chargers and the laptops often get separated.

6 there are signs that the supply and demand equation on used business laptops is easing from the height of the Covid 19 crisis from May 2020. For example, good condition Dell Latitude E7470's could be bought for £180 in March 2020. In May they were up at around £250. In August prices appear to be dropping back down to £215.

7 Even at £250 a Dell Latitude E7470 represents a really good compromise between price and being a great laptop for typical (non gaming) student use. It's a premium business laptop with a well engineered magnesium alloy chassis.

8 Business laptops from HP, Lenovo and Dell are the big sellers worldwide. In years going forward, business laptops from these 3 brands will be likely to have the cheapest and most easily available spares.

9 when buying a laptop you don't need to do an extensive set of tests to check it's working. Laptops like Dell business ones have a set of inbuilt diagnostics you can run when you get the laptop. Simply set the diagnostics off and go and have lunch and come back later to see if it has passed them all and to see an indication on how healthy the battery is. Then just use the laptop as you normally would and you'll soom be aware of any faults.

10. When buying a used laptop buy one where the lettering on one or more of the keys have rubbed off, or there's an area of the space bar that looks shiney / worn only if the laptop is at the right price. If you have a choice of 2 laptops at the same price and same general condition, go for the one with the freshest looking keyboard.

11 You can get laptops for Free! All you need is a contact in an IT Department of a large organisation. Ask them if you can have any laptops they are disposing off. Especially if the laptop will be used for charitable purposes, eg helping with the local Scout Group. Even if you have to buy a new battery and an SSD hard drive to make it into a nice to use laptop that's still an investment of under £80. And you've taken a very green approach to getting your laptop.

12 All Intel and AMD based business laptops will run Linux fine. If you're a techie type, or will be studying Computer Science, run Linux. It's a technically better operating system than Windows 10. And it's a nicer environment for coding. As well as the techie brownie points for running Linux instead of Windows.

13 read descriptions on used laptops carefully. If they don't mention the screen resolution, assume it's a somewhat rubbishy 1366 x 768 resolution. This is OK on a free laptop. For a laptop you've spent money on it doesn't make sense, when you can buy a Dell E7470 for £215 that comes with an FHD 1920 screen resolution as standard.
If they don't mention the hard drive type, assume it's a slow mechanical one. In that case all you should do is allow £30 ish for buying a brand new SSD for it. Dell E7470's come with SSD's as standard.

14 Touchscreens. Do you really want fingerprints all over your screen?

15 Do not buy from Currys. Unless you really absolutely must have something today in a mega emergency. If you can wait a few days, buy elsewhere, for better deals.
1) Agreed, and that's actually why I generally recommend mid-range laptops as they generally have better specs and the buyer will probably get more use out of them. Buy one laptop once, don't buy again for as long as possible.

2) For now, maybe, but in the future it's not a guarantee

3) Yeah, most of the advice in this guide doesn't involve gaming.

4) Most people might not know to do that.

5) While they're are other reasons for there not to be a charger included, it's still too much of a risk.

6) Coming up with prices is useless if you can't actually send me any links of active auctions/listings.

7) My answer to that is the same as 1 - futureproofing.

8) Technically true, but I don't know if that's worth what you give up.

9) For the techie type like you and me, that makes sense, but it's not safe to just jump to that conclusion.

10) That's only adding to my point on why it's better to go new.

11) Technically possible, but it's not a guaranteed solution.

12) In terms of hardware support, that is true and I have reworded it. However, I will admit that I don't necessarily agree with Linux being a nicer environment for development - honestly with the existence of the Windows Subsystem for Linux, especially WSL2, you've got to be using the system purely for development for it to be worth using Linux over Windows or macOS.

13) Most people I've met don't do that

14) I never said anything about touchscreens.

15) Again, this is aiming for a laptop that someone can just pick up and get on with.

This video has some decent advice if someone actually wants to go used, and for certain use cases it makes sense, but the fact of the matter is that there are too many stumbles and pitfalls for this to be something to recommend for most people who just want to pick up a laptop and get on with life without stumbling about with setting it up. Replacing a dead battery is one thing that may be an issue - most people I know don't always realize their battery needs replacing(or even know how).
Last edited by bluewolf21; 1 month ago
0
reply
Gofre
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 month ago
#8
(Original post by bluewolf21)
EDIT: On another note, I'm not going around saying your advice when you give your advice, can I please ask for that same respect?
Image
1
reply
bluewolf21
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#9
(Original post by Gofre)
Image
Sorry, I have to ask for an explaination.
0
reply
Gofre
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 month ago
#10
(Original post by bluewolf21)
Sorry, I have to ask for an explaination.
It's a silly meme used when people get uncomfortable/anxious from not saying/doing something, usually when the thing in question is something they can be somewhat evangelical about, like "when you met someone five minutes ago and you haven't mentioned you're a vegan yet".
0
reply
theJoyfulGeek
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 month ago
#11
(Original post by Gofre)
Image
Well, at least there aren't any Apple fans here yet. Apple computers are so overpriced for what they offer, and people are paying for the brand instead of the actual computer. The choice of apps is so much more restricted, Excel doesn't work as well, and the operating system is so inconvenient.


Spoiler:
Show
Although Acer is the best brand out there and better than Dell.
0
reply
theJoyfulGeek
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 month ago
#12
(Original post by Gofre)
It's a silly meme used when people get uncomfortable/anxious from not saying/doing something, usually when the thing in question is something they can be somewhat evangelical about, like "when you met someone five minutes ago and you haven't mentioned you're a vegan yet".
Sorry - I thought you were serious about buying a 6 year old Dell. I think I really missed the point here.
0
reply
bluewolf21
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#13
(Original post by Gofre)
It's a silly meme used when people get uncomfortable/anxious from not saying/doing something, usually when the thing in question is something they can be somewhat evangelical about, like "when you met someone five minutes ago and you haven't mentioned you're a vegan yet".
Oh, I see, I thought you were being serious.
Last edited by bluewolf21; 1 month ago
0
reply
spotify95
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 month ago
#14
This is a great guide, I've seen a lot of good advice here and it more of less tallies up with what I'd recommend.

The only things I'd say are:
1) I wouldn't recommending buying anything with 4GB RAM unless manually upgrading to 8GB.
2) I wouldn't recommend a 128GB SSD. A 500GB or 1TB mechanical would be so much more useful, despite the lower speed. E.g. I have a Surface Pro 3 with a 128GB SSD (its only drive) and whilst it's OK for on the go stuff, by the time you've installed any decent programs on it (i.e. ore than Office and Spotify), stored some documents (especially photos/videos - may be required sometimes) etc, you'll be wishing you'd gone for something larger.
My HP Omen 15 also came with a 128GB SSD (and also a 1TB HDD), most of the games and anything decent had to go on the HDD due to space issues. In the end I manually upgraded it to 1TB M.2 + 1TB 2.5 SSD.
3) Under £300 budget = go used, you can get decent 15 inch laptops around the 3rd gen (or newer) i5 CPU in the region of £250. Yes, they come with 1366x768 displays, but if you want a cheap laptop that is actually usable, the display resolution won't be a problem. Laptop displays have been 1366x768 as standard for quite some time now (until the recent push for 1080p), and there haven't been any major complaints about usability back then.
4) 15 inch laptops are still portable enough to be put in a bag, most larger rucksacks will take a 15.6in laptop (mine certainly does). On the used market, 15 inch laptops are generally cheaper than 14 inch as well.

So my advice:
New laptop: either 14 or 15 inch (depending on preference), i5 (8th generation) or better, Ryzen 5 or better - basically a decent quad core CPU. 8GB RAM (if a power user, look to upgrading it to 16GB if you can), and at least 250GB of any type storage (512GB recommended). 500GB SSDs can be had on eBay for about £50 or so.
Used laptop: decent 15 inch laptop with 8GB RAM (again, upgrade to 16GB if required) and 250GB or more storage, ideally Core i5 from 3rd/4th generation or newer.

And if you cannot afford at least a Core i3 and 8GB RAM new, then save up until you can, or go used. There is no reason to purchase a Celeron or Pemtium (or anything low end).

One thing: if you get a laptop with Windows 10 in S mode, then get out of S mode as quickly as you can.

And for those considering a Macbook: are there any programs you will need, that require Mac OS? If the answer is no, then go Windows. Macs are far too expensive, as well as non repairable and non upgradeable.
2
reply
bluewolf21
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#15
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#15
(Original post by spotify95)
This is a great guide, I've seen a lot of good advice here and it more of less tallies up with what I'd recommend.

The only things I'd say are:
1) I wouldn't recommending buying anything with 4GB RAM unless manually upgrading to 8GB.
2) I wouldn't recommend a 128GB SSD. A 500GB or 1TB mechanical would be so much more useful, despite the lower speed. E.g. I have a Surface Pro 3 with a 128GB SSD (its only drive) and whilst it's OK for on the go stuff, by the time you've installed any decent programs on it (i.e. ore than Office and Spotify), stored some documents (especially photos/videos - may be required sometimes) etc, you'll be wishing you'd gone for something larger.
My HP Omen 15 also came with a 128GB SSD (and also a 1TB HDD), most of the games and anything decent had to go on the HDD due to space issues. In the end I manually upgraded it to 1TB M.2 + 1TB 2.5 SSD.
3) Under £300 budget = go used, you can get decent 15 inch laptops around the 3rd gen (or newer) i5 CPU in the region of £250. Yes, they come with 1366x768 displays, but if you want a cheap laptop that is actually usable, the display resolution won't be a problem. Laptop displays have been 1366x768 as standard for quite some time now (until the recent push for 1080p), and there haven't been any major complaints about usability back then.
4) 15 inch laptops are still portable enough to be put in a bag, most larger rucksacks will take a 15.6in laptop (mine certainly does). On the used market, 15 inch laptops are generally cheaper than 14 inch as well.

So my advice:
New laptop: either 14 or 15 inch (depending on preference), i5 (8th generation) or better, Ryzen 5 or better - basically a decent quad core CPU. 8GB RAM (if a power user, look to upgrading it to 16GB if you can), and at least 250GB of any type storage (512GB recommended). 500GB SSDs can be had on eBay for about £50 or so.
Used laptop: decent 15 inch laptop with 8GB RAM (again, upgrade to 16GB if required) and 250GB or more storage, ideally Core i5 from 3rd/4th generation or newer.

And if you cannot afford at least a Core i3 and 8GB RAM new, then save up until you can, or go used. There is no reason to purchase a Celeron or Pemtium (or anything low end).

One thing: if you get a laptop with Windows 10 in S mode, then get out of S mode as quickly as you can.

And for those considering a Macbook: are there any programs you will need, that require Mac OS? If the answer is no, then go Windows. Macs are far too expensive, as well as non repairable and non upgradeable.
I can't really disagree with a lot of that - only things I would say is that while having a Pentium, 4GB of RAM and 128GB of storage isn't particularly great, I think it would be serviceable to be fair. If someone were on a tight budget, I would probably go used as it's the lesser of three evils(Used Laptop, Chromebook, Cloudbook, that last one is the vein of my life).
1
reply
DominicW123
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#16
Report 1 month ago
#16
(Original post by bluewolf21)
bluewolf21's Student Laptop Guide

Introduction notes
  • This guide is aimed at helping most students picking a laptop. This should not be interpreted as the be-all-end-all advice, rather as a general guide.
  • If you still need help picking a laptop, feel free to comment on this thread, PM me, or start your own thread.
  • If you want recommendations, please look at this form as it makes it easier to recommend a laptop that suits your needs well. If not, please give a budget at a minimum as that's the bare minimum amount of information needed to give advice.
  • Anything bold in blue is the main advice. Anything not in blue is the extra information(i.e. reasoning) that goes along with that.

Display
  • I would personally recommend getting a 14” laptop as it offers the best balance of having something that provides enough screen for real work, whilst also being fairly small to put into a bag.
  • 13.3 inches – Typically found in smaller laptops like the 13.3" MacBooks, these are good if getting something small as possible is a main priority, but while the difference between this and a 14” laptop isn’t drastic, the extra 0.7" still makes a bigger difference than you would think.
  • 14 inches – Generally a nice balance of being small to put into a bag, whilst having enough room to get real work done with. If you're unsure which screen size to go with, go with this one.
  • 15.6 inches – Generally better for media consumption, and for people who value screen real estate, but do keep in mind that these laptops come with the compromise of generally bigger and heavier to carry around all day.
  • 17.3 inches – great if you want something that you can just leave at home with tons of screen real estate, but you will likely have a hard time getting a laptop of this size into a bag, and if you can it’d likely be too heavy.
  • Size is subjective and comes down to personal preference at the end of the day. When we're not in the middle of a pandemic, it's worth going into a store and checking whether you get along with a particular size.
  • I would avoid screens with low resolutions like 1366x768 and jump up to 1080p if you can help it. Laptop Mag did a really good article on the matter here, but the TLDR is that things will look flat out worse and with 1080p screens being fairly common across most price points, it's quite hard to recommend a laptop with a lower resolution.

Operating System
  • Windows 10 – the most common operating system, and the one to go for if you're unsure. Advantages are better software support, better hardware support and it often comes preloaded on a lot of systems. Disadvantages are that it is more prone to viruses than others, though common sense and the built in Windows Defender take care of this.
  • macOS – this is the one you will find on Apple's Mac computers. Advantages are deep integration with other Apple Products(e.g. iPhone, iPad), and generally good use of screen space. Disadvantages are that you are restricted to Apple’s own hardware, which generally costs a lot of money and commonly has some shortcomings, such as the limited ports and upgradability.
  • Linux – Advantages are that it is free and is generally quicker. Disadvantages are generally worse hardware support and the software you might need isn’t guaranteed to run. If you are interested in this one, I would create a thread for laptops with good Linux support.
  • Chrome OS – decent on a tight budget, however if you can come up with the extra money for a good Windows Laptop, I would pick that. Advantages are that it is quite fast on low-end hardware and has some nice tie-ins with Android (though not as many as iOS and macOS). Disadvantages are poor software support(hence why I generally don't recommend them unless you're on a tight budget), and you will be restricted to Google-sanctioned hardware (though this comes from a variety of manufacturers).

Processor/Graphics Card
  • Most people should aim for something with at least an 8th gen i5 or newer (i.e. 1035g1), or an AMD Ryzen 5 CPU. The latter should have 4 cores at a minimum (i.e. 3500u), or 6 cores if you can help it (for example, a 4500U).
  • If you can afford to do so, avoid the lower end Intel Core i3, and to a lesser extent AMD Ryzen 3 systems as while the latter has 4 cores in the latest generation, the Core i3s and older Ryzen 3s only have 2 cores, which while certainly sufficient, will make things a touch slower, and will come with the caveats of potentially shorter longevity – at the end of the day futureproofing doesn’t hurt.
  • Don’t get a laptop with dedicated graphics if you will just be doing tasks like writing essays, watching movies, TV shows, YouTube etc., and likely video conferencing, as these often come at the expense of things like battery life and portability, and often with gaming laptops, fan noise. While there are exceptions to those downsides like the ASUS Zephyrus G14, or the Dell XPS 15, it is safe to say most people should skip over this.
  • Do get a laptop with dedicated graphics if you will be doing something like Engineering, and to a lesser extent some creative courses like Graphic Design as the dedicated graphics will seriously come in handy, especially for engineering in which you’ll be running CAD software like SolidWorks, which really benefits from the extra graphical power provided by the GPU.
  • For the latter scenario of creative courses, something like this ASUS ZenBook with a Ryzen 4500U and a lower end MX350 will still give you enough performance for the tasks you will be doing, whilst also keeping your device relatively thin and light.
  • For engineering, I would get something with a more powerful GTX/RTX Card (i.e. GTX 1650) as while the MX cards are good for stuff like Photo and Video editing, they are not so good for CAD Software. I would personally pick this Lenovo Ideapad Gaming 3 on the budget end, or the Asus G14 on the premium end.

RAM
  • If you can afford it, I would strongly recommend getting something with 8GB as this will run a bit quicker, you'll often be able to run more apps on your laptop at once, and besides it’s fairly cheap to jump up to 8GB anyway.
  • For most people, though, 4GB would be serviceable, just expect some general slowdowns, especially when multitasking.
  • If you will be doing Engineering or Creative subjects, I would bump the minimum RAM up to 8GB, and get 16GB if you can afford it, as the type of apps you will be running like CAD software and the Adobe suite respectively are unlikely to run well on 4GB.

Storage Space
  • 128GB is the minimum amount of storage for most people, however again I would recommend getting 256GB if you can afford it as at least on full-blown OSes like Windows or macOS, as you start installing apps you will find that you start to run out of storage pretty quickly on anything lower than that.
  • Get a secondary storage solution like a USB stick, cloud storage, or an external hard drive instead of getting a laptop with an internal mechanical hard drive as while mechanical hard drives will get you much more storage for less money, the downside is that the computer will run a bit too slow for comfort. Plus, it's always a good idea to keep your important data in a secondary location.

Budget
  • For a laptop with the specs that I generally recommend for most people, expect to pay around £500-£600. However a lot of people of can't pay that, so I've listed
  • £200-£300 - You can't really win in this budget. If you can come up with extra money to get something in the price range of £300-£400, then I would do that as that little bit of extra money will go a long way to getting something that will be more usable. If you really can't come up with that extra money, though, then it's worth making your own thread, PMing me or leaving a reply to this thread so we can see what's available to suit your needs.
  • £300-£400 - This is where we start getting into actually-worth-buying territory - any of laptops in this price will certainly be usable for a lot of use cases - though again you can get a better computer by coming up with the extra money.
  • £400-£500 - A pretty decent price point, again most of the laptops in this price point are beginning to become worth buying, and you can get some of the specs that I recommend in this price range with deals and student discount.
  • £500-£600 - This is the sweet spot between having a good level of performance and also being pretty good value. Often this is the price range that the laptops I recommend fall in.
  • £600-£1000 - This is generally where you'll find more entry level gaming laptops, most 2-in-1s with the specs that I recommend, and some more premium laptops.
  • £1000+ - This is basically where you'll find your more premium offerings, like the MacBook range, the Dell XPS laptops, most of the Microsoft Surface family, and Lenovo's ThinkPad X1 Carbon. I generally don't recommend these as while you do often get more luxuries like better build quality, somewhat lower weight and size, and sometimes better battery life, often these aren't worth hundreds of pounds extra for a lot of people.

TLDR for most people
  • Most people should aim for a 14” traditional laptop with either an AMD Ryzen 5, or an 8th Gen or newer Intel Core i5, 8GB of RAM, a 256GB SSD, and a 1080p display. This Lenovo Ideapad 5 fits basically all of those requirements for £530(normally £580).

General Buying Advice.
  • If you can come up with the extra money for something decent (anything with at least 4GB RAM, a 128GB SSD, Pentium/Athlon), most people should just buy a brand new laptop rather than going used as the used market is a minefield, and at the time of writing prices seem to be inflated on account of working from home. However, for those who need a lot of performance for not much money, or are on a tighter budget of around £300, this is a great way to get a decent computer for not much money, though I would first recommend watching this video by the 8-bit-guy as it covers some really good tips on going this route. If anything, avoid used laptops that do not come with a charger as there is too high a chance the laptop was stolen.
  • If you have a student discount, I strongly recommend taking advantage of this if it is available at the place you are purchasing the laptop from as unless there’s a sale which brings the price down to lower than it would be with student discount, it would just be a waste of money not to.
  • Wait for back to school sales as they are a great way to save money if you are buying something for a course.
  • PSA for those looking at MacBooks – I would advise on holding out for the release of the Apple Silicon MacBooks later this year, as while they will have teething issues to start, the current Intel based MacBooks will likely suffer from a shorter life span of anywhere within the realm of 3-5 years.
  • As it's free and quick to come out of it, I wouldn't discount laptops with Windows 10 S, or to go by it's other/proper name, Windows 10 S mode. Microsoft made a guide on how to do so here.

Where to buy a laptop from?
  • Contained within the spoiler is a list of good places to buy a laptop from:

  • Buying from the manufacturer directly isn't a bad idea. Again, within the spoiler are links to the main manufacturers:
Spoiler:
Show
This is a great general guide but I'm going to add that if you're not sure and want more specific advice there's a great subreddit called r/SuggestALaptop where you can get tailored advice to your buying needs specifically.
2
reply
Horny4Maths
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#17
Report 4 weeks ago
#17
(Original post by Dunnig Kruger)
1 the most important factor when deciding which laptop to buy is ~"What will you be using it for?"

2 If you will be using it for web browsing, word processing, simple spreadsheets, video conferencing then a 4th gen i5 CPU with 4GB RAM will be massive overkill. All you need is an SSD to run these applications lightning fast.

3 If you will be using it to play Far Cry 5, 6, 7 and 8 then it makes sense to get the snazziest, fastest internal bits you can get.

4 Buying used off ebay via paypal from a seller with good feedback is not a minefield. If the item isn't fully as described you simply return it for a full refund.

5 It's scare-mongering to say that laptops that come without chargers represent a too high a risk that they are stolen. Especially if you are buiying a used business laptop. In the corporate world chargers get lost all the time. Users that are leaving the organisation hand their laptops back in without the charger all the time. Because they want to keep the charger for personal use and are just following to the letter their instructions to hand their laptop and phone back in. Or the charger was routed via the cable management of their desk and they didn't think it was their job to untangle it and retrieve it.
Also Dell chargers have a habit of the outer insulation slipping off a section of the charger lead. When this happens the charger will be instantly binned by the IT Department. When collecting laptops when they are being refreshed, it's common for the laptops to be placed in 1 pile and the chargers in a separate big box. When it comes to disposal time the chargers and the laptops often get separated.

6 there are signs that the supply and demand equation on used business laptops is easing from the height of the Covid 19 crisis from May 2020. For example, good condition Dell Latitude E7470's could be bought for £180 in March 2020. In May they were up at around £250. In August prices appear to be dropping back down to £215.

7 Even at £250 a Dell Latitude E7470 represents a really good compromise between price and being a great laptop for typical (non gaming) student use. It's a premium business laptop with a well engineered magnesium alloy chassis.

8 Business laptops from HP, Lenovo and Dell are the big sellers worldwide. In years going forward, business laptops from these 3 brands will be likely to have the cheapest and most easily available spares.

9 when buying a laptop you don't need to do an extensive set of tests to check it's working. Laptops like Dell business ones have a set of inbuilt diagnostics you can run when you get the laptop. Simply set the diagnostics off and go and have lunch and come back later to see if it has passed them all and to see an indication on how healthy the battery is. Then just use the laptop as you normally would and you'll soom be aware of any faults.

10. When buying a used laptop buy one where the lettering on one or more of the keys have rubbed off, or there's an area of the space bar that looks shiney / worn only if the laptop is at the right price. If you have a choice of 2 laptops at the same price and same general condition, go for the one with the freshest looking keyboard.

11 You can get laptops for Free! All you need is a contact in an IT Department of a large organisation. Ask them if you can have any laptops they are disposing off. Especially if the laptop will be used for charitable purposes, eg helping with the local Scout Group. Even if you have to buy a new battery and an SSD hard drive to make it into a nice to use laptop that's still an investment of under £80. And you've taken a very green approach to getting your laptop.

12 All Intel and AMD based business laptops will run Linux fine. If you're a techie type, or will be studying Computer Science, run Linux. It's a technically better operating system than Windows 10. And it's a nicer environment for coding. As well as the techie brownie points for running Linux instead of Windows.

13 read descriptions on used laptops carefully. If they don't mention the screen resolution, assume it's a somewhat rubbishy 1366 x 768 resolution. This is OK on a free laptop. For a laptop you've spent money on it doesn't make sense, when you can buy a Dell E7470 for £215 that comes with an FHD 1920 screen resolution as standard.
If they don't mention the hard drive type, assume it's a slow mechanical one. In that case all you should do is allow £30 ish for buying a brand new SSD for it. Dell E7470's come with SSD's as standard.

14 Touchscreens. Do you really want fingerprints all over your screen?

15 Do not buy from Currys. Unless you really absolutely must have something today in a mega emergency. If you can wait a few days, buy elsewhere, for better deals.
With regards to bullet point 15, where would you advise looking instead?
0
reply
Joy L
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#18
Report 4 weeks ago
#18
bluewolf21
WOW, this is an amazing thread. Super helpful. Congrats xx
2
reply
bluewolf21
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#19
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#19
(Original post by Horny4Maths)
With regards to bullet point 15, where would you advise looking instead?
I know you probably weren't expecting my response, but there's a spoiler with a list of good places to buy from underneath the "Where to buy from?" section.
0
reply
bluewolf21
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#20
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#20
(Original post by Joy L)
bluewolf21
WOW, this is an amazing thread. Super helpful. Congrats xx
Thank you :yy:
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How are you feeling ahead of starting University?

I am excited and looking forward to starting (45)
13.68%
I am excited but have some apprehension around Covid-19 measures (46)
13.98%
I am concerned I will miss out on aspects of the uni experience due to new measures (120)
36.47%
I am concerned the Covid-19 measures at uni are not strong enough (33)
10.03%
I am nervous and feel I don't have enough information (67)
20.36%
Something else (let us know in the thread!) (18)
5.47%

Watched Threads

View All