green212
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I'm thinking of studying natural sciences at university, the physical and chemical side of it (with some computing if it is offered), and I was wondering what unis are good for this?
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Luwei
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Cambridge, Durham, UCL, Nottingham and Exeter?
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carlyhorne
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Universities which immediately spring to mind:

-Cambridge
-UCL
-Durham
-Exeter
-York
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artful_lounger
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Any university with good physics and/or chemistry departments that also offer natural sciences. You may also want to look at courses like chemical physics or chemistry with molecular physics, available at a few universities (e.g. Edinburgh and UCL) which covers both physics and chemistry, albeit not specifically in a natural sciences format.

I would note that any chemistry degree will include some physics-y content in the form of physical chemistry, and those with strengths in physical chemistry research will often offer options in computational methods/computational chemistry and have the potential to do your dissertation/project in some area of theoretical and computational chemistry that may allow you to study some programming formally.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Luwei)
Cambridge, Durham, UCL, Nottingham and Exeter?
(Original post by carlyhorne)
Universities which immediately spring to mind:

-Cambridge
-UCL
-Durham
-Exeter
-York
Exeter doesn't even have a chemistry department, and the only chemistry modules available are taught via the bioscience department with the exception of a single physical chemistry module taught by the natural sciences committee, so that's a pretty poor recommendation for someone who is specifically interested in chemistry as part of natural sciences...
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green212
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Any university with good physics and/or chemistry departments that also offer natural sciences. You may also want to look at courses like chemical physics or chemistry with molecular physics, available at a few universities (e.g. Edinburgh and UCL) which covers both physics and chemistry, albeit not specifically in a natural sciences format.

I would note that any chemistry degree will include some physics-y content in the form of physical chemistry, and those with strengths in physical chemistry research will often offer options in computational methods/computational chemistry and have the potential to do your dissertation/project in some area of theoretical and computational chemistry that may allow you to study some programming formally.
Thank you. Are there any natural science courses at specific universitiies you would recommend?
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by green212)
Thank you. Are there any natural science courses at specific universitiies you would recommend?
Not really, the obvious ones are, well...obvious. Durham and Cambridge for natural sciences, UCL and Edinburgh for chemical physics, Imperial for chemistry with molecular physics are probably the more notable options that would let you pursue aspects of both chemistry and physics concurrently.

As I said though, generally any university with good physics and chemistry departments that offer natural sciences are probably worth considering, of which there are quite a few possibilities, and there are a few others offering chemical physics/chemistry and/with molecular physics type courses including both sides (I believe UEA and Nottingham have such courses off the top of my head; both also offer natural sciences, so you might want to look at what the differences between the options in each course would be).
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green212
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How respected is the Durham natural sciences?
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by green212)
How respected is the Durham natural sciences?
It's a pretty common "second choice" for people who apply to Cambridge if they don't get in there, so considered fairly well one must assume. My impression is their course is slightly better organised then UCL's, although I've not personally studied at either and only know someone who did natsci at Durham so, this is very much anecdotal.

There is the caveat that for chemistry in natsci at Durham they have a limited amount of bench space available so you need to specify if you wish to do chemistry from the outset, and you may get an offer allowing you to study chemistry, an offer excluding chemistry, or of course not get an offer. I'm not aware of any other courses having such a restriction. As a result you may find after applying if you don't get an "including chemistry" offer that it's not one you wish to make a firm or insurance...
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ryanalevel
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(Original post by green212)
I'm thinking of studying natural sciences at university, the physical and chemical side of it (with some computing if it is offered), and I was wondering what unis are good for this?
I hear Cambridge, Durham, and Bristol are excellent for Natural Sciences
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by ryanalevel)
I hear Cambridge, Durham, and Bristol are excellent for Natural Sciences
Although Bristol is good for the natural sciences defined as a broad range of subject areas, it does not have a specific natural sciences degree where you can mix and match different science subjects. Their various single subject and joint honours science courses are pretty well regarded though, yes.
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green212
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
It's a pretty common "second choice" for people who apply to Cambridge if they don't get in there, so considered fairly well one must assume. My impression is their course is slightly better organised then UCL's, although I've not personally studied at either and only know someone who did natsci at Durham so, this is very much anecdotal.

There is the caveat that for chemistry in natsci at Durham they have a limited amount of bench space available so you need to specify if you wish to do chemistry from the outset, and you may get an offer allowing you to study chemistry, an offer excluding chemistry, or of course not get an offer. I'm not aware of any other courses having such a restriction. As a result you may find after applying if you don't get an "including chemistry" offer that it's not one you wish to make a firm or insurance...
Thank you so much. What woudl you say about the natsci course at leeds?
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by green212)
Thank you so much. What woudl you say about the natsci course at leeds?
Don't really know anything about it; I mainly know of Leeds on the STEM side of things for their earth sciences and engineering courses :dontknow:
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green212
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what is the leeds natsci course like?
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green212
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what is the natsci course at leeds like?
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Ghostlady
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My daughters friend studies at Lancaster for natsci
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Lancaster Student Ambassador
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(Original post by green212)
I'm thinking of studying natural sciences at university, the physical and chemical side of it (with some computing if it is offered), and I was wondering what unis are good for this?
Hi @green212,
The natural sciences course at Lancaster should allow you to study a combination of three subjects (or what we call pathways).
This includes computing, and a range of chemistry and physics (if this is what you're interested in), as well as other subjects.
You can find out about the course here.
Let me know if you have any questions or anything I can help you with!
Charlotte
3rd year Biological Sciences with Biomedicine
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green212
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(Original post by Lancaster Student Ambassador)
Hi @green212,
The natural sciences course at Lancaster should allow you to study a combination of three subjects (or what we call pathways).
You can find out about the course here.
Let me know if you have any questions or anything I can help you with!
Charlotte
3rd year Biological Sciences with Biomedicine
Hi Charlotte,
do you know anyone studying the course at lancaster that i could talk to?
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Lancaster Student Ambassador
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(Original post by green212)
Hi Charlotte,
do you know anyone studying the course at lancaster that i could talk to?
Hi @green212,

I'd recommend that you check out our UniBuddy platform here, where you can chat to students doing the course about their experiences.

If you have any other questions, we'd be happy to help!

Maria
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(Original post by green212)
I'm thinking of studying natural sciences at university, the physical and chemical side of it (with some computing if it is offered), and I was wondering what unis are good for this?
Hi there,

Bath is one of the top unis in the UK and has a great NatSci course. You could do physics and chemistry through the NatSci course at Bath. I would suggest looking at this thread that I started about the NatSci course, as well as this thread where I broke down the main aspects and pros/cons of the course. This webpage from the university has a few helpful documents that summarise the course and different modules.

I would say that Durham's course is also very good and quite similar to how the Bath course is structured. Based on my experience when I was applying, the UCL and Cambridge courses looked good academically but were a bit more restrictive and less flexible than the Bath and Durham courses.

Hopefully they can give you a good idea of the Bath course, but please feel free to ask me if you have any more questions
Jessica, a final year NatSci student
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