Asetheticmoo
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Hello! I’m a teen just wanting company in my own home other than my siblings and my parents because we don’t really get along.I really want a hamster for my birthday and I asked my parents but they disapproved,I said things like “I will pay for everything” and “I will look after it” but all they said is “We don’t want a hamster because they will stink up they house,And you can’t even look after yourself”. Please help me persuade them by telling me what to do and say to them!! Thanks 😊✨
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(Original post by Asetheticmoo)
Hello! I’m a teen just wanting company in my own home other than my siblings and my parents because we don’t really get along.I really want a hamster for my birthday and I asked my parents but they disapproved,I said things like “I will pay for everything” and “I will look after it” but all they said is “We don’t want a hamster because they will stink up they house,And you can’t even look after yourself”. Please help me persuade them by telling me what to do and say to them!! Thanks 😊✨
I understand you want for a hamster but quite honestly they’re not always the right choice. They really don’t live very long (which is awful when you get so attached to their cute little faces) and their nocturnal nature means that you will hardly see them. Whilst guinea pigs are such social and loving animals, they can live for about 6 years, which may not be ideal if you’re considering going to uni. Rabbits don’t have as much personality as guineas pigs, however they can be potty trained. Training is really easy and if the potty is cleaned every couple of days they honestly don’t smell, even in hot weather. They’re tidy animals, easy to look after and the potty or litter tray is so much quicker than cleaning out a whole hamster or guinea pig hutch - it only takes two minutes. However it is so important that you reach an agreement with your parents before jumping into it, as it won’t just cause tension between you, but unfair on the animal if it has to be rehomed. Perhaps find some research online to print off and show to your parents and find out what they’ll compromise with. But hope you get a furry pal in the end! Hope this helps
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LovelyMrFox
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A hamster might not be the best if your looking for company. Post 2 summed it up pretty well.

Is there a reason your parents say you wont look after it? Do you have a pattern of not following through on things or 'quitting' things easily?

Asking for a pet for your birthday usually doesnt give the right impression. Animals are not 'presents', they take lots of time and work. Getting a pet is something you need to sit down with your parents and talk about, rather than just asking for one for a holiday.
With that being said, have you done actual research on getting a hamster or was this spontaneous? They take much more than giving it a bit of food and a wheel to run on, contrary to popular belief.
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CoolCavy
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In theory i would be a hypocrite to say dont get an animal for your birthday
I got my first pair of guinea pigs age 13 for my birthday. HOWEVER it was me who researched them all, i did so for a year almost obsessively and found out everything you could possibly need to know about them. I presented all this to my parent while we were on a walk and the fact i had researched them so thoroughly really helped to persuade them (they actually love them possibly even more than me now ). We went to get them about a couple of days before my birthday (i.e it wasnt a box with guinea pigs 'surprise' situation).
At the time i was doing horseriding every two weeks, i said to my parent that i would give this up and the money saved from that could go on the guinea pigs. I.e the guinea pigs and their expenses became my pocket money. I think making compromises like this proves you are mature enough to take on the responsibility. You really need to be honest with yourself about if you will lose interest in them, i'm 21 now and have had 12 guineas and 2 hamsters, they are my passion so there is no guarantee you wont stick to them but equally you need to consider that possibility.

You also need to ask why a hamster? For me with guinea pigs it was because a dog or a cat was non viable (i actually prefer rodents to both of those now ), i wasnt too keen on rabbits and guinea pigs were both social enough that they would be out for me to see them and also you have to keep them in pairs so it was 2 pets for the bargaining of one
To be completely honest rodents are underestimated, to look after one properly it is a lot of work, i would put guinea pigs up there with cats for the amount of effort they need. 2 feeds a day, constant hay, cleaning every 2 days, deep clean once a week, grooming, nail clipping etc. You also need to bear in mind that rodents are prey animals so you have to slowly tame them, so although you dont have to train them in the way you do with say a dog you do need to coax them gently and be patient. They arent a pet you can just rush to hugging.
Hamsters are pretty much the same but slightly less work (i have also had 2 hamsters which i brought when i was 20 and 21). As long as their cage is appropriately sized you dont need to clean them out that often (once a week is enough). They eat less and they are also less messy in my experience as guinea pig hutches are a)larger and b) usually the bedding is woodshavings and they have a tendency to get everywhere. For hamsters paper bedding is the best and also happens to be the cleanest so its win win.
However in my personal opinion hamsters dont make the best young persons pet. This is because they are nocturnal and less social than say a guinea pig. Syrian hamsters (assuming you are referring to these in your OP as they are the most common type kept) are solitary (never ever put a syrian with another, you will end up with a dead hamster as they fight to the death) and therefore they arent really a 'snuggly' sort of pet that needs your company and pines for it. This is individual of course and my older hamster sebastian is almost like a tiny dog but it is something you need to be mindful of. Even if they are the most affectionate like my sebastian is they will only be available to socialise with at night when typically people are asleep. Personally i love their nocturnalness as i have a funny sleep pattern but for those still at school they might not be the best choice.
They need a lot more space than people give them credit for and toys so they dont get bored. The majority of cages and wheels sold in pet shops arent suitable for hamsters (too small). An appropriate sized cage will be expensive but you can make your own out of storage boxes and there are tutorials online about how to make these so called 'bin cages'
I hope that was helpful, these points arent made to put you off, having a pet when you are younger can be a really enriching experience but it's also best to be well informed so you can make the right decisions for both you and the animal
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Asetheticmoo
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
In theory i would be a hypocrite to say dont get an animal for your birthday
I got my first pair of guinea pigs age 13 for my birthday. HOWEVER it was me who researched them all, i did so for a year almost obsessively and found out everything you could possibly need to know about them. I presented all this to my parent while we were on a walk and the fact i had researched them so thoroughly really helped to persuade them (they actually love them possibly even more than me now ). We went to get them about a couple of days before my birthday (i.e it wasnt a box with guinea pigs 'surprise' situation).
At the time i was doing horseriding every two weeks, i said to my parent that i would give this up and the money saved from that could go on the guinea pigs. I.e the guinea pigs and their expenses became my pocket money. I think making compromises like this proves you are mature enough to take on the responsibility. You really need to be honest with yourself about if you will lose interest in them, i'm 21 now and have had 12 guineas and 2 hamsters, they are my passion so there is no guarantee you wont stick to them but equally you need to consider that possibility.

You also need to ask why a hamster? For me with guinea pigs it was because a dog or a cat was non viable (i actually prefer rodents to both of those now ), i wasnt too keen on rabbits and guinea pigs were both social enough that they would be out for me to see them and also you have to keep them in pairs so it was 2 pets for the bargaining of one
To be completely honest rodents are underestimated, to look after one properly it is a lot of work, i would put guinea pigs up there with cats for the amount of effort they need. 2 feeds a day, constant hay, cleaning every 2 days, deep clean once a week, grooming, nail clipping etc. You also need to bear in mind that rodents are prey animals so you have to slowly tame them, so although you dont have to train them in the way you do with say a dog you do need to coax them gently and be patient. They arent a pet you can just rush to hugging.
Hamsters are pretty much the same but slightly less work (i have also had 2 hamsters which i brought when i was 20 and 21). As long as their cage is appropriately sized you dont need to clean them out that often (once a week is enough). They eat less and they are also less messy in my experience as guinea pig hutches are a)larger and b) usually the bedding is woodshavings and they have a tendency to get everywhere. For hamsters paper bedding is the best and also happens to be the cleanest so its win win.
However in my personal opinion hamsters dont make the best young persons pet. This is because they are nocturnal and less social than say a guinea pig. Syrian hamsters (assuming you are referring to these in your OP as they are the most common type kept) are solitary (never ever put a syrian with another, you will end up with a dead hamster as they fight to the death) and therefore they arent really a 'snuggly' sort of pet that needs your company and pines for it. This is individual of course and my older hamster sebastian is almost like a tiny dog but it is something you need to be mindful of. Even if they are the most affectionate like my sebastian is they will only be available to socialise with at night when typically people are asleep. Personally i love their nocturnalness as i have a funny sleep pattern but for those still at school they might not be the best choice.
They need a lot more space than people give them credit for and toys so they dont get bored. The majority of cages and wheels sold in pet shops arent suitable for hamsters (too small). An appropriate sized cage will be expensive but you can make your own out of storage boxes and there are tutorials online about how to make these so called 'bin cages'
I hope that was helpful, these points arent made to put you off, having a pet when you are younger can be a really enriching experience but it's also best to be well informed so you can make the right decisions for both you and the animal
Thank you for your help!!
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